Mental Health Insights

By Jeannine Ricci

Last month brought awareness to not only cystic fibrosis but also mental health.  This is fitting since it’s estimated that CF patients are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from anxiety or depression when compared to the general population.

I haven’t escaped this statistic; I’m one of the estimated 19% of CF adults that struggle with depression and one of estimated 33% of adults that struggle with anxiety. Choosing this topic wasn’t easy. Although it’s not something I hide, having hundreds of readers know my personal mental health battles is daunting, so I’ll keep this post more informative than expressive. Another deterrent was the idea of writing an article could sometimes suggest that you’ve overcome an obstacle and want to share your tools for success. Truth be told, anxiety and depression are still very present in my life and I’m far from being on the other side. Despite these hesitations, I decided to go ahead and choose this topic that is uncomfortable to talk about because that’s the only way to remove the stigma of mental illness– acknowledge and validate it and by doing so, reassuring those challenged by it that they are not alone.

I decided to hone in on 3 insights that I hope to be beneficial for others to hear; this benefit will be defined by impact and not by number of people helped because I’ll be writing about topics that only the minority of those with anxiety and depression can relate to. But reaching this minority is so important because as I can personally attest, it’s such an isolating place to be.  

Insight #1

As counterintuitive as it seems, improved mental health does not always follow improved physical health. Having a disease altering medicine, such as Kalydeco, change the trajectory of your disease may lead to confusing, conflicting emotions, sometimes even leading to worsening of anxiety and depression. When the burden of CF is lightened, other issues that you didn’t have the mental energy and strength to cope with may begin to surface. There can be many facets involved, including regret about past decisions made based on a now altered blueprint of your future, shift in identity, and survivor’s guilt to name just a few. My guess is this is a response shared by a small minority and I don’t expect most to understand as it’s taken me years to delve into the complexities. My goal in sharing isn’t so much to explain to those who can’t grasp how emotional healing doesn’t always accompany physical healing as it is to reassure those reading that have had similar struggles to know that you aren’t alone. I hope that this knowledge in and of itself will bring you comfort.

Insight #2

Panic attacks can lead to symptoms beyond the well-known fight or flight symptoms of increased heart rate, hyperventilation, dizziness, nausea, tingling sensations, sweating, and tremors. They can also cause feelings of being detached from your body and/or surroundings. This is called depersonalization and derealization.

In other words, panic can lead to the terrifying, deeply disturbing feeling that you are going insane. It’s a symptom that’s rarely talked about even though it’s been reported to occur in about 40% of panic attacks. The distress that comes with the feeling of losing touch with reality contributes to the panic cycle and heightens feelings of intense fear. Having the knowledge that this is a temporary symptom and is your body’s defense mechanism built in to protect you will hopefully help to deescalate feelings of anxiety and loss of control when in the midst of a panic attack.

Insight #3

Think outside the box for treatment strategies when conventional treatments aren’t effective for depression.  

For most people, treatment for depression is highly effective. It’s estimated that between 80 to 90 percent of people with depression respond well to traditional treatments such as counseling and/or antidepressants.

But what about the 10-20% of people who aren’t responsive to these treatments?  Becoming your own advocate and researching alternative treatments is crucial to finding a treatment that may benefit you. One such treatment is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS). TMS was FDA approved in 2008 for treatment of major depression in adult patients for whom traditional therapies have failed or for those unable to tolerate the side effects of antidepressants. TMS uses a magnetic force in an effort to stimulate areas on the left side of the brain that are usually less active in depressed patients. It’s generally well tolerated and covered by most insurance companies. Its success rate in lessening depressive symptoms in those with treatment resistant depression is about 58%, with a remission rate (total cessation of depressive symptoms) of about 37%. A word of caution for those who have a diagnosis of both anxiety and depression: as TMS lifts your depression, you might have an increase in your anxiety symptoms. Discuss this with your doctor prior to starting and ask if they have a plan should this occur. Some doctors will alter their protocol and administer treatments on the right side of the brain simultaneously to counteract this issue.

My hope is that this post will help someone in their battle against anxiety and depression whether it is through lessening feelings of isolation, alleviating some of their fear, or delivering a flicker of hope where there was none.  

Mental health resources:

Cystic Fibrosis Research Inc. (CFRI) support programs: Psychosocial Support Programs & Classes

TMS information (note: this website doesn’t have up-to-date information on TMS providers. Check with your insurance company to find an in-network provider): What is TMS

Headspace: https://www.headspace.com/

MindShift-CBT: https://anxietycanada.com/resources/mindshift-cbt/

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 195 Summiting Mount Everest and Denali with Nick Talbot

In the latest CF Podcast, Nick Talbot shares his incredibly unique journey with cystic fibrosis. From being diagnosed at the age of 13 to his latest climb – a trek up Denali, the highest point in North America – he constantly challenges himself to reach for his dreams. Nick stresses the importance of pushing one’s own personal limits and never being scared to fail – because failure simply means you tried.
Tune in to learn more about Nick and his cystic fibrosis story.

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Novartis to the Boomer Esiason Foundation.

Antioxidant Supplement Helps Cystic Fibrosis Patients, Study Finds

By Carolina Henriques

A special formulation of an antioxidant-enriched multivitamin helped decrease the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to a new study.

The findings, by researchers at Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine under the title “Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial.”

Inflammation is an important contributor to lung damage and to progressive lung function decline in CF. In the study, researchers looked at the effects of a “cocktail” of multiple antioxidants on inflammation and health outcomes in CF patients.

“Single oral antioxidant formulations have been tested previously in CF with mixed results. However, there had not been a well-designed, randomized controlled trial of an antioxidant ‘cocktail’ that included multiple antioxidants in a single formulation,” Scott Sagel, MD, PhD, said in a University of Colorado news story. Sagel is the study’s first author and a pediatric pulmonologist at Children’s Colorado.

The 16-week study (NCT01859390) was conducted from September 2013 to October 2015 at 15 U.S. CF centers affiliated with the CF Foundation’s Therapeutics Development Network.

The study included 73 pancreatic-insufficient CF patients, 10 years and older (average age 22), who could not adequately absorb important dietary antioxidants such as beta-carotene, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), tocopherols (vitamin E), and selenium, which help neutralize inflammation in the body.

Participants received either capsules of antioxidant-enriched multivitamins, or control multivitamins without antioxidant enrichment. The capsules were designed specifically for people with difficulties in absorbing fats and proteins, like CF patients.

The investigational antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement, called AquADEKs-2, contains standard amounts of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) plus several antioxidants, including beta-carotene, mixed tocopherols, CoQ10, mixed carotenoids (lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin), and the minerals zinc and selenium.

Sagel and his team found that the antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement increased the concentration of antioxidants in the bloodstream, and temporarily reduced inflammation at four weeks, even though these results were not sustained through the end of the 16 weeks of the study.

In addition, antioxidant supplementation was found safe and well-tolerated by study participants.

Researchers also observed that antioxidant treatment appeared to prolong the time to the first pulmonary exacerbation requiring antibiotics, and also to reduce the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations altogether.

For the full article, please visit CF News Today.

I’m on the transplant list, now what?

In Jerry Cahill’s latest edition of The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. Selim Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center discusses what happens once a patient is on the transplant list.
The first three major steps are:
  1. Create a strict exercise program with the hospital rehab center and integrate it into the patient’s schedule.
  2. Meet with a nutritionist in order to maintain proper weight.
  3. Educate! Meet with the care team in order to understand the entire process – both pre and post transplant.
The transplant process is a long one – and thoroughly detailed – in order to increase the chances of success. Tune in to learn more from Dr. Arcasoy.

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medial Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

NuvoAir Launches Air Next spirometer– and it uses Bluetooth!

by- Market Insiders, PR Newswire

“The Air Next uses Bluetooth Low Energy, which is a more efficient and cost-effective form of wireless technology, to instantly forward this data from the spirometer to a smartphone or tablet.”

If you’re like me and you very much dislike the extra ten seconds it takes out of your day to write down and journal your spirometry numbers, keep reading. And too, if you’re like me and you forget to bring that journal sheet with you to your doctor to show him your numbers, fear not- you don’t even have to leave your house. Just share it through the cloud. Yes, I know… another cloud.

For those of us who have received a transplant– I believe you know this well. After your surgery you are to use spirometry everyday. Everyday. For a few reasons we are told. To check for rejection, if you’re spirometry numbers are declining. To see, for both personal and medical purposes where you live (what your baseline FEV1 is). Then if you want to brag and show someone. Me: “Look mom, I am taking care of myself. Today I went up 3%.”
It’s very important. My doctors use my home numbers as if I’m doing my PFT’s at their office.
And lastly, this new Air Next looks cool! It’s not like the one hospitals give you that looks like you’re blowing into a 1950’s portal, that’s designed like the inside of a pinball machine. Seriously, check this thing out!

To keep reading visit the article below; also make sure to check out the images:
http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/nuvoair-launches-air-next-revolutionary-new-home-device-to-help-those-with-serious-lung-conditions-1001941321