Lessons Learned Through Parenting and CF

Guest Blog By Jeannine Ricci

Back in 2001, when I became a mother, resources on parenting
with CF were practically nonexistent. Thanks to all of the
research advancements, it’s so exciting to now see more and
more people with CF exploring the possibility of parenthood.
Because this topic is becoming more prevalent, I thought it might
be a good time to resurrect an article that I wrote 5 years ago. It
discusses my experience with talking with my children about CF
and the possibility of a shortened life expectancy. Hopefully it will
help other parents as they face this challenging subject.
At the end of the article, I give an update on my daughters
and how their experience with my CF continues to impact their
lives.

***Lessons Learned- Parenting with CF***

My CF has shaped my children’s lives for as long as they can
remember. As toddlers, they developed patience. After many
temper tantrums, they eventually learned that I had to finish my
treatments before we embarked on our day’s adventures. As
preschoolers they learned empathy. They would run to get me
tissues and water if I was having a coughing fit. Their teachers
would comment on the level of empathy they showed their
classmates and how unusual it was at such a young age. During
their school years, they are learning to become more
independent. Just last week, my older daughter surprised me by
making their lunches and helping her sister with her homework
because she knew I was not feeling well.

Since CF had been woven into their everyday lives, I took their
comfort level with my CF for granted. They knew that CF meant
coughing, treatments, and IVs. What they did not know was that
it is a life-threatening disease. I regret having not broached this
subject with them as soon as I felt they were mature enough to
handle this information. Last year my daughter’s teacher called
to tell me that he was concerned about her. She was not herself
at school. She was very distracted and seemed depressed. I
knew immediately what was bothering her. I was on IVs because
of an especially difficult exacerbation. The side effects of the
antibiotics left me on the couch most of the day. It was the
sickest she had ever seen me. We had a long discussion after the
phone call and she opened up to me and told me how she had
read something at the CF walk that stated that the life
expectancy of someone with CF was 37 years old. I was 40. It
truly broke my heart to know that I was not there to answer her
questions and ease her fears when she read this critical piece of
information. She deserved to hear this from me. As I spoke to
her, I tried to give her realistic but hopeful answers. I told her
that I wanted nothing more than to watch her and her sister
grow up and that I hoped to be there for her college graduation,
her wedding, and the birth of her children. I explained that there
are so many new medicines being discovered that would help to
make this a possibility, but I also told her that there are no
guarantees, and that is why I try so hard to keep myself as
healthy as possible.

Just as my children have always incorporated important life
lessons from my illness into their lives, I believe that this
discussion will only further strengthen their character. It will
teach them the value of treating every day as a gift. I hope my
experience encourages other parents with CF to be prepared to
have this pivotal discussion with their children. No matter how
difficult it may seem, it will be worth the peace of mind knowing
that you will be the one delivering this information, ready to help
them cope with their fears.

Here are some guidelines from Lisa C. Greene, a mom of two
children with CF and co-author with Foster Cline, M.D. of the book
Parenting Children with Health Issues (www.PCWHI.com)

• Pivotal parenting moments can take us by surprise, so be
prepared ahead of time. Our answers should be honest, calm,
matter-of-fact, and hopeful. We shouldn’t use terms like “fatal”
or “life-shortening” nor should we make empty promises. Use
terms like “healthier” rather than “healthy,” “more likely to live a
long time” rather than “will live a long time.”

• We need to try our best not to let our own fears and worries
show, both in our words and in our body language. Children pick
up on (and tend to mirror) their parents’ emotional cues,
especially when they are young. If you are having trouble
controlling your own emotions about these tough issues,
counseling might be helpful.

• At some point, we do need to address the issue of life
expectancy. Hopefully, this will be clarified by around the age of
eight (around 3rd grade) depending on the maturity of your
child. One way to address this issue is to ask your child questions
to open up dialogue. Some examples are:
“How much do you know about CF?”
“How are you handling it?”
“Is there anything about CF that worries you?”

With a little awareness and preparation, you can make talking
about these difficult issues a positive experience. Relationships
can grow closer when people go through tough times together.

Update: 5 Years Later
It’s no surprise that this disease has continued to shape my
daughters’ lives over the past 5 years. There’s no denying that my CF, anxiety, and depression have caused many hardships for my family. And it’s
difficult not get swallowed up in the guilt of knowing that there
are times that I’m not able to be the mom that I desire to be, the
mom that they deserve. During these times, I try my best to
focus on the positive ways CF has touched their lives.

The attributes of fortitude and courage were fostered as they
watched my battle with CF progression as it inched its way closer
and closer to the center of my life–our lives–demanding more
attention. And then, in November of 2014, they witnessed hope
being transformed into tangible reality as I swallowed my first
dose of Kalydeco. This new reality has allowed them to more
confidently envision me by their sides in the distant future. They
have embraced this gift with a deep sense of gratitude that can
only be felt when someone has experienced the threat of the
unbearable alternative.

They have watched as this same gratitude has fueled my desire
to help others who are still waiting for their miracle. At the young
ages of 15 and 17, they possess a keen understanding of the
intrinsic value in every life, and that the amount of money in
someone’s bank account or what type of insurance they have
should not be dictating access to these life-saving medications.

They have learned the importance of taking action and
advocating for others, even if your voice is seemingly
overpowered by others. They have both participated in the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation’s Teen Advocacy Days in Washington D.C.
the last few years, meeting with members of Congress and
stressing the importance of ensuring adequate healthcare
coverage for all. They recognize the gifts both given and received when you touch a person’s life indelibly and both of my daughters have expressed an interest in pursuing a career in the healthcare field. 

I’m so proud of them as I watch them develop into
compassionate, strong, young women, inspired to make their
mark on this world; a mark that undoubtedly would not be so
deep and impactful if it wasn’t for the valuable life lessons they
have gleaned from having someone they love with CF.

CF Foundation ‘Venture Philanthropy’ Model Crucial to CF Breakthroughs

By Larry Luxner

When the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) was established in 1955, most people with cystic fibrosis (CF) didn’t make it to their sixth birthday. Today, the average life expectancy of a CF patient is 47 years.

To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 12 CF therapies. Three of them are CFTR modulators that treat the basic disease-causing defect, benefiting 60 percent of all patients, and more therapies are on the way.

Preston W. Campbell III, the CFF’s president and CEO, directly attributes this dramatic improvement to the foundation’s philosophy of “venture philanthropy.”

“We are now in Phase 3 CFTR trials that, if successful, will mean that as early as next year, more than 90 percent of all individuals with CF will have a highly effective therapy targeting CF’s basic defect,” he said. “More therapies that treat the complications of CF are in the pipeline than ever before.

“It begs the question: how did all of this happen?”

Campbell answered that during his March 26 presentation, “Patient advocates taking a real stand in drug development: How the CFF worked with biotech and pharma to find a cure,” at the 2018 World Orphan Drug Congress USA in Oxon Hill, Maryland.

Back in 1960, the Bethesda, Maryland-based foundation broke ground by establishing a Care Center Network to provide multidisciplinary care. Within five more years, it had formed a patient registry.

With only $400,000 in the bank, it would also commit $11 million to research, Campbell said. “Five years later, in 1985, the basic CF defect was identified, and in 1989, the CFTR gene was discovered. That opened the floodgates,” he added.

Campbell’s predecessor, Robert J. Beall, created the Therapeutics Development Program — now called its Venture Philanthropy Model — in 1998 to entice industry to focus on CF, and specifically on CFTR as a target. Its three components were financial assistance, research tools and scientific advice, and a clinical trials network.

“We would lower the risk for industry to come into the CF space. We also made our research tools and scientific advice freely available, and we also embedded the best scientists in the world in these industry programs,” said Campbell, who took over from Beall as head of the CFF in January 2016. “Finally, in order to make sure clinical trials were safely and efficiently done, we created a clinical trials network that originally had seven centers and now has 89.”

In the beginning, CFF’s investments were typically in the $1.5 million range. Ultimately, the foundation invested more than $100 million in Aurora and its successor, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, whose headquarters are in Boston.

To date, the FDA has approved three Vertex CFTR modulators: Kalydeco (ivacaftor) for patients with the G551D mutation in the CFTR gene (2012); Orkambi (lumacaftor/ivacaftor)for patients who are homozygous for F508del, the most common mutation in the CFTR gene (2015); and Symdeko (tezacaftor/ivacaftor) for homozygous F508del patients as well as others (2018).

“Payments are milestone-based, so we pay for success,” Campbell said. “A scientific advisory committee determines if milestones are met and if the project should continue. Successful programs offer a return on our investment, so if the program is foundering, we shake hands and walk away.”

To continue to full article, please click here.

‘Sham’ or public interest? ICER suggests 70%-plus discounts on Vertex’s cystic fibrosis drugs

By Angus Liu

Vertex has often talked about its admiration for Gilead, setting the big biotech’s ability to roll out multiple antivirals as a model for its cystic fibrosis endeavor. Now, though, it faces the same pricing issue once pinned on Gilead’s hepatitis C franchise. But the company refuses to play sitting duck.

In a new report, the U.S. cost-effectiveness watchdog the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review argues that Vertex’s cystic fibrosis trio—Kalydeco, Orkambi and newly approved Symdeko—need a huge price cut to achieve cost-effectiveness. Its suggested discount? Over 70%. Continue reading ‘Sham’ or public interest? ICER suggests 70%-plus discounts on Vertex’s cystic fibrosis drugs

Introduction of New Therapies Affects Pregnancy Rates in Women With CF

The overall rate at which women with cystic fibrosis are becoming pregnant dropped slightly in recent years — coinciding with the introduction of CFTR modulators and the clinical trials that led to their approval as CF therapies — but appears to be rising again to pre-trial levels, a study reports.  Continue reading Introduction of New Therapies Affects Pregnancy Rates in Women With CF

New Promising Results from Phase 3 of Combination Therapy

Findings from a phase 3 trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of tezacaftor in combination with ivacaftor in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who were homozygous for the Phe508del mutation were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The Phe508del mutation has been known to result in greatly reduced conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity and a loss of chloride secretion, which can lead to impaction of mucus in the airways, gastrointestinal tract, and exocrine organs, with the potential for severe clinical consequences including gradual loss of lung function, nutritional deficits, pulmonary exacerbations, and respiratory failure. It is the most prevalent CFTR mutation worldwide, and affects approximately 46% of American CF patients.

Previous data has shown Ivacaftor’s association with a rate of progressive decline in lung function that is lower than that in untreated patients. In a phase 2 clinical trial involving patients who were homozygous for the Phe508del mutation or heterozygous for the Phe508del and G551D mutations, when combined with the investigational CFTR corrector tezacaftor, it has exhibited enhanced CFTR function and improved lung function.

In August, just one month removed from Vertex’s announcement of positive datafrom Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies, Rare Disease Report covered the acceptance of applications for the use of the tezacaftor/ivacaftor combination treatment in this patient population by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA).

The phase 3 trial enrolled a total of 510 patients 12 years and older with CF who were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation at 91 sites in the U.S., Canada, and Europe from January 30, 2015 to January 20, 2017. Patients were randomly assigned to be administered either tezacaftor and ivacaftor (administered as a fixed-dose combination tablet containing 100 mg of tezacaftor and 150 mg of ivacaftor in the morning and a tablet containing 150 mg of ivacaftor in the evening) combination therapy or placebo for 24 weeks.

In total, 475 patients completed the full 24 weeks of the trial, with 93.6% (n=235) in the tezacaftor-ivacaftor group and 93% (n=240) in the placebo group. While no significant difference in the body mass index (BMI) was experienced between the groups at week 24, the use of the combination therapy led to a significantly greater absolute change from baseline in the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) than placebo. Despite advances in standard-of-care therapy, patients with CF continue to lose lung function at a rate of an estimated 1% to 3% per year. This trial exhibited a significant effect of the combination therapy compared to the placebo, as the mean absolute change from baseline in FEV1 through week 24 was 3.4 percentage points in the former, compared to 0.6 in the latter.

The most common adverse events (AEs) among the enrolled patients included infective pulmonary exacerbation, cough, headache, nasopharyngitis, increased sputum production, pyrecia, hemoptysis, oropharyngeal pain, and fatigue. The incidence of AEs was similar in both the group for combination therapy and the placebo group, however, those treated with lumacaftor-ivacaftor in the phase 3 did not experience an increased incidence of respiratory events (33 patients [13.1%] vs. 41 patients [15.9%]).

This improved safety profile of the tezacaftor-ivacaftor combination supports its use in a broad range of patients with CF, and, if approved, the therapy will be the third of Vertex’s drugs approved for CF patients, and the second intended specifically to treat patients with F508del mutations (Orkami [lumacaftor/ivacaftor]).

For original article please visit: http://www.raredr.com/news/phase-3-combination-therapy-cystic-fibrosis?t=physicians

For the published study please visit: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1709846?query=genetics#t=articleDiscussion

A Brief Historical Timeline of CF Research to Date

Cystic fibrosis care has seen such rapid advances that the average CF patient has experienced a dramatic evolution in treatment strategies in their lifetime. Here are some of the biggest milestones that shaped modern-day CF treatments.

Continue reading A Brief Historical Timeline of CF Research to Date

Positive Results for Phase 3 Studies of the Tezacaftor/Ivacaftor Combination Treatment

Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (Nasdaq: VRTX) announced that the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published two articles with results from two Phase 3 studies of the tezacaftor/ivacaftor combination treatment, a medicine in development that is designed to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) in people ages 12 and older who have certain mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Continue reading Positive Results for Phase 3 Studies of the Tezacaftor/Ivacaftor Combination Treatment

Vertex Plans To Eradicate Cystic Fibrosis, And Go From There

Vertex Pharmaceuticals: Going From ‘Crisis’ To Blockbuster

Jeffrey Leiden, chief executive for Vertex Pharmaceuticals, plans to eradicate cystic fibrosis. (Vertex) Continue reading Vertex Plans To Eradicate Cystic Fibrosis, And Go From There

Lab-made “mini organs” helping doctors treat cystic fibrosis

http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/lab-made-mini-organs-helping-doctors-treat-cystic-fibrosis/

Els van der Heijden, who has cystic fibrosis, was finding it ever harder to breathe as her lungs filled with thick, sticky mucus. Despite taking more than a dozen pills and inhalers a day, the 53-year-old had to stop Continue reading Lab-made “mini organs” helping doctors treat cystic fibrosis

Vertex Drug Gets Priority Review for Cystic Fibrosis

http://www.empr.com/drugs-in-the-pipeline/tezacaftor-ivacaftor-vertex-cystic-fibrosis-priority-review-nda/article/684284/

Tezacaftor/Ivacaftor Gets Priority Review for Cystic Fibrosis

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Priority Review to the New Drug Application (NDA) of tezacaftor/ivacaftor (Vertex) for the treatment of patients ≥12yrs old with cystic fibrosis (CF) who have two copies of the F508del mutation or one F508del mutation and one residual function mutation.

The NDA submission was based on positive results from 2 global Phase 3 trials, which showed statistically significant improvements in lung function (percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second, or ppFEV1) in patients treated with tezacaftor/ivacaftor.

The combination treatment consists of ivacaftor (marketed under the brand name Kalydeco), a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator, and tezacaftor, a novel CFTR corrector. Tezacaftor is designed to address the processing defect of F508del-CFTR to enable it to reach the cell surface, where ivacaftor can further enhance the protein’s function.

The FDA has set a Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) target date of February 28, 2018 to make a decision on the NDA.

For more information visit Vrtx.com.