I’m Drowning – A researcher-patient’s plea for broader inclusion in cystic fibrosis trials

By: Ella Balasa

I’ve always known cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive disease; it destroys lung cells, tightens the small airways in the bottom of my chest, and each day takes me closer to the time when it will have ravaged my lungs. I had never really questioned if there was some way this process could be altered. I accepted that it couldn’t.

Recently, however, this has changed. The epicenter of new CF research is the development of medications that will slow, stop, and hopefully even reverse the effects and damage that CF inflicts on the body. The possibility of the cells in my lungs functioning to their full potential — with CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein function restored and working correctly, expelling chloride out of my cells, hydrating the surface of my lungs, and halting the thick sticky mucus that has caused my airways to be enveloped in a suffocating cloak for all these years — is like a feeling of being rescued when you are drowning.

Unfortunately, I am still drowning.

“I’m very sorry, Ms. Balasa, but you will not be able to be a participant in this clinical trial.” This was the response I received during one of my searches for these drug trials. Excited by the possibility of participating, finding one recruiting at my local adult clinic, I reached out to study coordinators and was informed that I met all but one criterion to participate in the studies. This specific criterion has prevented me from prior trial participation involving other investigational medications treating the symptoms of CF, including anti-infectives and anti-inflammatories.

Most CF studies, including phase I, II, and III trials, require a lung function minimum of at least 40% FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second). My FEV1 is 25%, so I am excluded from these trials. Many patients face a similar situation. The 40% threshold biases samples toward a young patient population, as this degenerative condition causes steadily decreasing lung function with time. Furthermore, as CF treatment has rapidly progressed and increased patients’ life expectancies, there are now more adults with CF in the U.S. than children, according to the CF Foundation Patient Registry.

As a patient who works in the science field, I started to ask myself: Where does that number come from? Should this one variable be such a deciding factor? Are we getting comprehensive results from these studies if a subset of patients is omitted? Are investigators using eligibility criteria from a prior study without determining whether the exclusions are scientifically justifiable?

To continue reading, please visit MedPage Today.

Sound Pharmaceuticals to present initial data on the STOP Ototoxicity Study at Cystic Fibrosis Conference

SEATTLESept. 25, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Sound Pharmaceuticals (SPI) is pleased to announce that its recent submission to the upcoming North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) Oct. 18-20 has been selected as a late-breaking abstract. This presentation will focus on the incidence and severity of ototoxicity in CF patients undergoing intravenous (IV) tobramycin treatment for acute pulmonary exacerbation. Ototoxicity (hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo or dizziness) is a common side effect of tobramycin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics (amikacin, gentamycin and streptomycin). Currently, there are no FDA approved therapies for the prevention or treatment of ototoxicity or any other type of sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, or dizziness. Continue reading Sound Pharmaceuticals to present initial data on the STOP Ototoxicity Study at Cystic Fibrosis Conference

Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

By Michele Wilson PhD

The buildup of mucus in the lungs is an ongoing challenge faced by people with cystic fibrosis, and knowing whether they should seek medical attention is not always clear.

Recently, Mologic – a developer of personalized diagnostics – have developed a tool which they hope will help guide people with cystic fibrosis so they can avoid unnecessary stays in hospital.

The app-embedded algorithm converts data collected from a urinary test to a traffic light result, which indicates whether a patient is stable or in need of medical intervention.

Recently, Mologic, announced that they are launching a clinical trial to assess the company’s urine-based diagnostic tool, ‘HeadsUp’.

To learn more about how this point-of-care diagnostic tool could help improve healthcare for people with cystic fibrosis, we spoke with Gita Parekh, Head of R&D at Mologic.

How do you define pulmonary exacerbation, and why is it important that it is monitored in people with cystic fibrosis? Continue reading Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

Patients Will Test Digital Platform to Manage CF-Related Diabetes (CFRD)

By Janet Stewart

Attain Health will partner with DarioHealth, a digital health and big data solutions company, to test its Dario Engage platform to monitor blood sugar levels in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with CF-related diabetes (CFRD). Attain Health provides integrative health coaching for CF patients.

CFRD is an unusual form of diabetes estimated to affect some 30,000 CF patients in the United States and 70,000 worldwide. Experts say that the hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) seen in CFRD patients results in higher rates of bacterial lung infections, and an increased risk of death.

“Effective diabetes management in cystic fibrosis patients is critical, as there is a sixfold increase in mortality among cystic fibrosis patients who have diabetes as compared to those who don’t. The increased risk of mortality from lung infections is correlated with hyperglycemic events,” Kat Quinn Porco, founder of Attain Health, said in a press release.

The three-month pilot study will include real-time tracking of 12 patients with CFRD using the Dario Engage digital platform, which includes a blood sugar monitoring device that transmits readings to the clinic. Attain Health will pay for access to the Dario Engage Dashboard to monitor participants.

The app is designed to help clinics detect blood sugar trends that could lead to disease progression. Disease management is also expected to be improved by DarioHealth’s ability to provide health education content via the app.

“We are very excited to move forward with DarioHealth in exploring the benefits of digital health solutions for patients living with cystic fibrosis. We chose to work with DarioHealth because of their platform’s patient-centric approach, ease of use, real-time actionable data, and their very favorable reputation in the diabetes market,” Porco said.

The companies plan to jointly present preliminary findings at the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference Oct.18-20 in Denver. Final results are expected in December.

Attain Health plans to obtain grant money for continuous use of the DarioEngage program with up to 200 patients a year.

“By piloting this study in partnership with Attain Health, DarioHealth is taking a leadership position in addressing CFRD by deploying what we believe are the best digital health management tools on the market today. This agreement and pilot study mark DarioHealth’s foray into chronic disease treatment markets that overlap with and expand beyond the treatment of diabetes, our company’s first treatment indication,” said Erez Raphael, president and CEO of DarioHealth.

Original article here.

Machine learning to help cystic fibrosis decision-making

By James Hayes

New research claims to have demonstrated that machine learning techniques can predict with a 35% improvement in accuracy – in comparison to existing statistical methods – whether a cystic fibrosis patient should be referred for a lung transplant.

The research, led by Professor Mihaela van der Schaar of the Alan Turing Institute at the University of Oxford, has been generated through a partnership between The Alan Turing Institute and charity the Cystic Fibrosis Trust. Continue reading Machine learning to help cystic fibrosis decision-making

Patient-reported outcomes: Time for a new approach?

By Janice Abbott

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurement (e.g. health-related quality of life questionnaires, symptom diaries) can provide a standardized, valid and reliable way of gaining the patients’ perspective on ‘how they are’ or the benefits and limitations of a specific intervention. The insights that patients have concerning their health are important given that aspects of patient-reported quality of life are independent predictors of survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) [1]. Regulatory authorities require the inclusion of PROs in clinical trials as an additional outcome parameter and PRO information is becoming important in labelling claims. It is noteworthy that the top 10 research questions, reached by global consensus of patient and healthcare providers, all require the inclusion of CF-specific PROs to achieve meaningful answers [2]. This represents a significant paradigm shift but capturing data that matters to patients, families and clinicians is challenging. Two of the persistent challenges in CF PRO measurement are a) the development and use of technologies to enable efficient administration, accurate scoring, and the correct interpretation of data and b) being able to accurately measure PROs (or parental proxy assessment) across the entire CF lifespan. These important issues are considered by two papers in this issue of the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis [34].

PRO measurement largely remains a research endeavour with little uptake in clinical practice. Administering, scoring and interpreting PROs in a busy clinic is difficult. It requires staff time and expertise and the results are not instantly accessible to steer a discussion with the patient or to aid clinical decision making. Paper-based data collection suffers from missing, unreadable data that is prone to scoring/mathematical error. The development of electronic PRO (ePRO) technologies is immensely important in clinical practice and for endpoint assessment in clinical trials. It is a cost-saving, patient-friendly approach to PRO assessment: data collection can occur in clinic, the patient’s home, workplace or school. Results can be added to a patient’s electronic medical file, alerts triggered by problematic scores and clinicians can track patient/parent-reported symptom/event data over time. Importantly, electronic data capture enhances the integrity and accuracy of the data, makes it logistically easier to collect repeated assessments (daily or at several points over a trial), and is preferred over paper-based data collection by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

There is growing evidence that paper and electronic versions of PROs typically provide comparable data but this requires psychometric evaluation if transferring an original paper-based questionnaire to an electronic mode of administration. Solé and colleagues have demonstrated measurement equivalence with paper and electronic administrations of the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (CFQ-R teen/adult version) [3]. The e-CFQ-R web version is linked to an online database that can be adapted for any electronic devise (smartphone, tablet, computer). Immediately the patient completes the questionnaire, results are sent to the healthcare team and the data are saved in a centralized, protected database. Real-time patient-reported data are available to the clinician as an adjunct to clinical data. Access to the English and Spanish versions are by independent web addresses provided in the paper. Ultimately, the integration of PRO data within electronic care records as developed by Peckham et al. [5], or in CF patient registries would enable efficient patient care and longitudinal research endeavours.

There is a lack of PROs that can be used as endpoints in early intervention studies in CF. Such instruments are time-consuming and painstakingly difficult to develop so the research of Edwards et al. reporting on the initial development of a CF-specific, parent-reported instrument for children 0–11 years is welcome [4]. The need for an effective way of data collection is also considered. The instrument takes the form of an electronic (web-based data capture), observational sign/symptom diary containing 17 respiratory and activity signs that parents report the presence or absence of. Results suggest that children aged 7 to 11 years are best reporting for themselves, therefore observational reporting by parents should focus on young children aged 0 to 6 years. Considerable evaluation has yet to determine the final instrument but the development of the scale follows FDA guidance enabling its acceptance as a clinical trial endpoint in infants and young children with CF.

Over the last twenty years we have learned a great deal about measuring patient-reported outcomes in CF, and there are many pitfalls when employing PROs in CF trials [6]. They are typically secondary endpoints and the trial is not powered on them, often making it difficult to draw valid inferences about treatments. However, there are trials that have collected patient-reported respiratory symptom data as the primary endpoint [78], employing the only CFQ-R subscale that has been approved by the FDA for use as an endpoint. Scientific, regulatory and pragmatic factors are driving the shift towards ePRO data collection. The development of ePROs is not trivial, yet they are fast becoming the ‘gold standard’ for PRO data capture in clinical trials. The challenge now is to develop CF-specific, lifespan PROs, utilising new technologies that can deliver real-time, high-quality PRO information. They also need to be acceptable to the regulatory bodies to aid their decisions on cost-effectiveness and ensure the appropriate commissioning of new medicines to improve the lives of people with CF and their families.

Original article with references here.

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 192 Emily’s Entourage

In the latest Cystic Fibrosis Podcast, Jerry speaks with Emily Kramer-Golinkoff about the role of a patient advocate organization in driving drug development in rare disease.
Emily, a 33-year-old who has a nonsense mutation of CF, is a co-founder of Emily’s Entourage, a 501 3(c) that’s goal is to accelerate research for new treatments and a cure for CF. She is an internationally recognized patient advocate and speaker, has a Master’s degree in Bioethics and is certified in Clinical Ethics Mediation, was named “Champion of Change” by President Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, and has been featured by CNN.com, Time.com, AOL.com, People.com, and more for her work with her charity.

Continue reading Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 192 Emily’s Entourage

Newfound airway cells may breathe life into tackling cystic fibrosis

By Aimee Cunningham

Meet the ionocyte. This newly discovered cell may be the star of future cystic fibrosis therapies. Researchers have found that the gene tied to the disease is very active in the cells, which line the air passages of the lungs.

While the cells are rare, making up only 1 to 2 percent of cells that line the airways, they seem to play an outsized role in keeping lungs clear. The identification of the ionocyte “provides key information for targeting treatments,” says medical geneticist Garry Cutting of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, who was not involved in the research. Two teams, working independently, each describe the new cell online August 1 in Nature.

The ionocyte shares its name with similar cells found in fish gills and frog skin. This type of cell regulates fluid movement at surfaces — skin, gills, airways — where air and water meet. In people, special proteins that tunnel across cell membranes lining the airways allow chloride ions (half of what makes salt) to move into the airway. This causes water to move into the airway through a different channel to moisten mucus along the lining, which helps it remove bacteria and inhaled particles from the body.

The tunnel protein that allows chloride ions through is made by a gene called CFTR. In cystic fibrosis patients, that gene is flawed. Airways can’t regulate water movement properly and get clogged with thick mucus that traps bacteria and leads to persistent infections and lung damage. The genetic disease affects at least 70,000 people worldwide, according to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in Bethesda, Md.

Researchers had suspected CFTR was most active in ciliated cells — cells with brushlike projections that work along with the mucus in airways to move invaders out. But the new work found very little gene activity in those cells, compared with the ionocytes.

In experiments with laboratory samples of mouse cells from the airway lining, cell biologist Jayaraj Rajagopal of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and his colleagues found that the gene was very active in ionocytes: out of all the instructions for building the tunnels detected in the cells, 54 percent came from ionocytes. Aron Jaffe, a respiratory disease researcher at Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., and his colleagues reported that, in laboratory samples of human airways cells, ionocytes were the source of 60 percent of the activity of the tunnels.

The discovery of the new cells raises a lot of questions. Jaffe wonders where ionocytes are positioned in the lining of the airways, and how that placement supports the coordination of water movement and mucus secretion by other cells. “You can imagine the distribution [of ionocytes] is really important,” he says.

A question Rajagopal has: “How does a rare cell type do all of this work?” In fish and frogs, ionocytes are loaded with mitochondria, the so-called cellular energy factories, he notes. Maybe that will be true for human ionocytes, too, giving them lots of energy to do the lion’s share of regulating the movement of water.

Both researchers say the ionocyte’s discovery should lead to a better understanding of cystic fibrosis. “It will let us think about creative new ways to approach the disease,” Rajagopal says.

Original article here.

Triclosan, often maligned, may have a good side — treating cystic fibrosis infections

By Chris Waters

Maybe you’ve had the experience of wading in a stream and struggling to keep your balance on the slick rocks, or forgetting to brush your teeth in the morning and feeling a slimy coating in your mouth. These are examples of bacterial biofilms that are found anywhere a surface is exposed to bacteria in a moist environment.

Besides leading to falls in streams or creating unhealthy teeth, biofilms can cause large problems when they infect people. Biofilms, multicellular communities of bacteria that can grow on a surface encased in their own self-produced matrix of slime, can block immune cells from engulfing and killing the bacteria or prevent antibodies from binding to their surface.

On top of this, bacteria in a biofilm resist being killed by antibiotics due to the sticky nature of the matrix and activation of inherent resistant mechanisms, such as slow-growing cells or the ability to pump antibiotics out of the cell.

Biofilms are one of the primary growth modes of bacteria, but all antibiotics currently used clinically were developed against free-swimming planktonic bacteria. This is why they do not work well against biofilms.

My laboratory studies how and why bacteria make biofilms, and we develop new therapeutics to target them. Because antibiotic resistance is the most problematic aspect of biofilms during infections, we set out to identify novel molecules that could enhance antibiotic activity against these communities.

We discovered that an antimicrobial that has recently obtained a bad reputation for overuse in many household products could be the secret sauce to kill biofilms.

The hunt for antibiotic superchargers

To find such compounds, we developed an assay to grow plates of 384 tiny biofilms of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We did this to screen for molecules that enhance killing by the antibiotic tobramycin. We chose this bacterium and this antibiotic as our test subjects because they are commonly associated with cystic fibrosis lung infections and treatment.

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at particular risk from biofilm-based infections. These infections often become chronic in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and are often never cleared, even with aggressive antibiotic therapy.

After we screened 6,080 small molecules in the presence of tobramycin, we found multiple compounds that showed the antibiotic enhancement activity we were searching for. Of particular interest was the antimicrobial triclosan because it has been widely used in household products like toothpaste, soaps and hand sanitizers for decades, indicating that it had potential to be safely used in CF patients. Triclosan has also garnered a bad reputation due to its overuse, and states like Minnesota have banned it from these products. The Food and Drug Administration banned its use from hand soaps in September 2016. This ruling was not based on safety concerns, but rather because the companies that made these products did not demonstrate higher microbial killing when triclosan was added, compared to the base products alone.

Another fact that piqued our interest is that P. aeruginosa is resistant to triclosan. Indeed, treatment with either tobramycin or triclosan alone had very little activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but we found that the combination was 100 times more active, killing over 99 percent of the bacteria.

We further studied this combination and found that it worked against P. aeruginosa and other bacterial species that had been isolated from the lungs of CF patients. The combination also significantly enhanced the speed of killing so that at two hours of treatment, virtually all of the biofilm is eradicated.

Our efforts are now focused on pre-clinical development of the tobramycin-triclosan combination. For CF, we envision patients will inhale these antimicrobials as a combination therapy, but it could also be used for other applications such as diabetic non-healing wounds.

Although questions about the safety of triclosan have emerged in the mainstream media, there are actually dozens of studies, including in humans, concluding that it is well tolerated, summarized in this extensive EU report from 2009. My laboratory completely agrees that triclosan has been significantly overused, and it should be reserved to combat life-threatening infections.

The next steps for development are to initiate safety, efficacy and pharmacological studies. And thus far, our own studies indicate that triclosan is well tolerated when directly administered to the lungs. We hope that in the near future we will have enough data to initiate clinical trials with the FDA to test the activity of this combination in people afflicted with biofilm-based infections.

We think our approach of enhancing biofilm activity with the addition of novel compounds will increase the usefulness of currently used antibiotics. Learning about how these compounds work will also shed light on how bacterial biofilms resist antibiotic therapy.

Original article here.

Omega-3 Compound Reduces Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in New Pilot Study

By Jennifer Prince

A marine omega-3 compound comprising a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) sn1-monoacylglyceride (MAG-DHA) may act as an anti-inflammatory for subjects with cystic fibrosis, according to a new pilot study1 published in the journal Marine Drugs. In the study, MaxSimil (Neptune Wellness Solutions; Laval, QC, Canada) increased omega-3 red blood cell levels, helped moderate the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) to docosahexaenoic acid, and reduced key inflammatory biomarkers in subjects with cystic fibrosis. Continue reading Omega-3 Compound Reduces Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in New Pilot Study