Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

By Michele Wilson PhD

The buildup of mucus in the lungs is an ongoing challenge faced by people with cystic fibrosis, and knowing whether they should seek medical attention is not always clear.

Recently, Mologic – a developer of personalized diagnostics – have developed a tool which they hope will help guide people with cystic fibrosis so they can avoid unnecessary stays in hospital.

The app-embedded algorithm converts data collected from a urinary test to a traffic light result, which indicates whether a patient is stable or in need of medical intervention.

Recently, Mologic, announced that they are launching a clinical trial to assess the company’s urine-based diagnostic tool, ‘HeadsUp’.

To learn more about how this point-of-care diagnostic tool could help improve healthcare for people with cystic fibrosis, we spoke with Gita Parekh, Head of R&D at Mologic.

How do you define pulmonary exacerbation, and why is it important that it is monitored in people with cystic fibrosis? Continue reading Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

Antioxidant-Enriched Multivitamin May Decrease Respiratory Illnesses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Scott D Sagel MD PhD
Professor of Pediatrics
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Aurora, Colorado

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Inflammation is an important feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease and contributes to lung damage and lung function decline in CF. We need safe and effective anti-inflammatory treatments in CF. Anti-oxidant therapy has been an area of promise, but with mixed results in CF.

This clinical trial, conducted at 15 CF centers affiliated with the cystic fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Development Network, enrolled 73 patients who were 10 years and older (average age 22 years), with pancreatic insufficiency, which causes malabsorption of antioxidants. Subjects were randomized to either a multivitamin containing multiple antioxidants including carotenoids such as beta(β)-carotene, tocopherols (vitamin E), coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and selenium or to a control multivitamin without antioxidant enrichment. The antioxidants used in the study were delivered in a capsule specifically designed for individuals with difficulties absorbing fats and proteins, including those with cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Antioxidant supplementation was safe and well-tolerated. Supplemental antioxidants increased antioxidant concentrations in the bloodstream in treated subjects and temporarily reduced inflammation in the blood at four weeks but not 16 weeks. Airway inflammation, as measured in sputum, did not change significantly with antioxidant treatment. Importantly, antioxidant treatment appeared to both prolong the time to the first respiratory illness requiring antibiotics and reduce the frequency of respiratory illnesses they experienced.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Taking a specially formulated antioxidant-enriched multivitamin, containing multiple dietary antioxidants, may decrease respiratory illnesses in people with cystic fibrosis. While more research needs to be done to find a treatment that delivers a sustained anti-inflammatory effect, we believe the prolonged time patients had before their first respiratory illness is clinically meaningful. Also, the cost of a dietary antioxidant-enriched multivitamin is relatively modest compared to other currently available therapies that have been proven to reduce pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We still don’t know the optimal dosing of these various dietary antioxidants. We also don’t know the added benefit of antioxidant supplementation in the era of CFTR modulator therapy, emerging treatments that get at the basic protein defect in cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: This clinical trial, funded by a grant from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, was an investigator-initiated study led by Scott D. Sagel, MD, PhD, a Professor of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Colorado and Director of the University of Colorado Cystic Fibrosis Center. It was not an industry initiated or funded trial. Callion Pharma manufactured the antioxidant-enriched and control multivitamins and provided them at no charge for this study.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:
Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial
Scott D Sagel , Umer Khan , Raksha Jain , Gavin Graff , Cori L Daines , Jordan M Dunitz , Drucy Borowitz , David M Orenstein , Ibrahim Abdulhamid , Julie Noe , John P Clancy , et al
https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201801-0105OC PubMed: 29688760
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

Published Online: April 24, 2018

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

Original interview article here. 

Cinnamon Oil Compound Might Block Bacteria Like P. aeruginosa from Forming Biofilms

By: Alice Melao

A natural component found in cinnamon oil, known as cinnamaldehyde or CAD, may be able to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria from spreading in an organism and inhibit their ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms, researchers show.

These findings may support further study into anti-microbial medications that can help control the behavior of these so-called superbugs, or treatment-resistant bacteria, which represent a serious healthcare problem for people with cystic fibrosis and other diseases.

The discovery was reported in “Cinnamaldehyde disrupts biofilm formation and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa,” published in the journal Microbiology.

“Humans have a long history of using natural products to treat infections, and there is a renewed focus on such antimicrobial compounds,” Sanjida Halim Topa, PhD, a researcher at Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, and lead study author, said in a university news release. “Natural products may offer a promising solution to this problem.”

Cinnamaldehyde, one of the major components of cinnamon oil, is responsible for its characteristic flavor. This compound is known to have antimicrobial activity against many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa; a stomach ulcer-causing bacteria called Helicobacter pylori; and Listeria monocytogenes, which is responsible for the food-borne infection listeriosis.

“We hypothesized that using natural antimicrobials, such as essential oils, might interfere in [drug-resistant] biofilm formation,” Topa said. “Though many previous studies have reported antimicrobial activity of cinnamon essential oil, it is not widely used in the pharmaceutical industry.”

Working with researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the team conducted several experiments to evaluate the impact of different concentrations of cinnamaldehyde on P. aeruginosa biofilms.

They found that non-lethal amounts of the essential oil compound could disrupt by 75.6 % antibiotic-resistant, preformed P. aeruginosa biofilms. Cinnamaldehyde was found to prevent the production of a bacterial-signaling protein essential for bacteria communication and biofilm formation. [Biofilms, or microbe communities whose growth is facilitated by the thick and sticky mucus that marks CF, are known to promote antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa lung infections.]

In a concentration-dependent manner, cinnamaldehyde also could reduce the motility of the bacteria, preventing them from spreading elsewhere, the scientists reported.

These findings, the researchers wrote, show “CAD can disrupt biofilms and other surface colonization phenotypes through the modulation of intracellular signaling processes.”

They are now investigating the use of cinnamaldehyde embedded-wound dressings as a way to treat skin infections.

Original article here.

Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations

NovaBiotics Ltd (“NovaBiotics”) announces that its oral therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF), Lynovex®, has met the study objectives of the CARE CF 1 clinical trial.

CARE CF 1 assessed the effects of two weeks of Lynovex treatment as an adjunct to standard of care therapy (SOCT) in CF, compared to placebo plus SOCT. This trial was designed to determine whether the inclusion of Lynovex capsules alongside SOCT lessened the clinical impact of exacerbations in adults with CF, as measured by symptom severity and levels of bacteria and inflammatory mediators in sputum and blood.  CARE CF 1 was a 6-arm study with the primary objectives of determining the optimal dose and regimen of Lynovex in patients with exacerbations of CF-associated lung disease and to further evaluate the safety and tolerability of Lynovex in exacerbating CF patients.  Continue reading Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations

Surviving Home IVs As a Mom

By Janeil Whitworth

I’m no stranger to home IV antibiotics.

Actually, if I am being completely honest, I think we have gotten a little too friendly over the past decade or so. I prefer to do home IVs because I am one of those patients who goes a little nuts after being trapped in the hospital for too long. Seclusion and unlimited access to cable are not beneficial to my physical or mental well-being. I need the opportunity to be with people just as much as I need the comfort of my own bed to rest and heal completely. I’ve even gone as far as learning to access my own port-a-cath to create even further distance between the hospital and me. Plus, I enjoy the luxuries of home IVs such as creating my own schedule, eating my own food, using my own toilet paper, and coming and going as I please.

Releasing control

I’m positive I’m not the only one who struggles to release control over my disease while experiencing an exacerbation. Feeling the façade of freedom slipping away post-IV-talk, I involuntarily tighten my grip on my independence in a desperate attempt at normalcy.

In-patient admission? No way. Home IVs? Ok, I can do that. Thankfully, you can travel on home IVs, celebrate your bachelorette party on home IVs, and even graduate college on home IVs. But is it possible to successfully care for a 9-month-old baby on home IVs?

After the past few weeks of increased shortness of breath and unwavering fatigue, I agreed it was time for IVs. The reality of home IVs as a mom suddenly hit me as I exhaustedly said for the millionth time that day, “Please, don’t eat mommy’s IVs, buddy.”

I knew this was not going to be easy with a mobile, energetic baby crawling every which way, leaving a trail of alcohol pads in his path. (I think this might be the fatigue talking, but the crunchy hospital bed and one-ply toilet paper are starting to seem a little better right now.)

The last time I did home IVs, my son was 4 months old, so it made it a tad easier as he was just a chubby and adorable blob. I would set him down, hook myself up to the antibiotic-filled Eclipse ball, and he wouldn’t move. Those were the days.

There’s been very little rest this week, and admittedly, I tried my hardest to do it all even if I was feeling absolutely poisoned. In my defense, I felt my independence as a mom was slipping away once again, and the impulse to hold on tighter completely crept up on me. This way of thinking will not benefit me in the long run, neither as a mother, nor as a patient. A week has passed since I accessed my port to begin treatment, and I can see more clearly now that I am in desperate need of a different rhythm.

Finding a different rhythm

I am going to attempt to take my own advice for the remainder of treatment, including: 1) Ask for help; 2) Be easy on myself when it comes to everything else; 3) Remain grateful for the privilege of staying home. My normalcy in the coming weeks will look a little different. My parenting style will be altered as well. I need to accept that this is the price for staying home with my baby, while simultaneously being the nurse and patient. Everything needs to be taken in stride as I release my grasp and let the rest, antibiotics, and baby hugs heal me. I think this is the key to surviving home IVs with my health, sanity, and pride intact. I hope.

This blog was originally published on CF News Today.

Cystic Fibrosis Disease Severity Linked to Immune Overreaction to Fungus, Study Reports

By Ana Pena

Disease severity in cystic fibrosis (CF) may be associated with an overreaction of the immune system to the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, particularly due to a type of white blood cell called a phagocyte — which ingests and kills invading organisms — a study suggests.

U.K. researchers found that phagocytes from CF patients release higher amounts of harmful reactive oxygen species in response to Aspergillus fumigatus, a common cause of lung infection in these patients.

The study, “Aspergillus-induced superoxide production by cystic fibrosis phagocytes is associated with disease severity,” was published in the journal ERC Open Research.

Recent studies have supported the idea that the widespread environmental fungus Aspergillus fumigatus may play a critical role in CF lung disease.

Up to 58% of CF patients are colonized with this fungus, and an estimated 47.7% of adult patients are affected by either allergic reactions or infection caused by the fungus.

Persistent infections with A. fumigatus are also known to be adversely correlated with lung function and hospitalization in CF patients.

Researchers hypothesized that the anti-fungal defense mechanism in CF patients might be altered and have an impact on the progression of lung disease.

To investigate this hypothesis, the team compared the immune response of phagocytes from CF patients with those of healthy individuals used as controls, and tried to correlate them to clinical metrics of disease severity.

For original article please visit CF News Today.

Antioxidant Supplement Helps Cystic Fibrosis Patients, Study Finds

By Carolina Henriques

A special formulation of an antioxidant-enriched multivitamin helped decrease the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to a new study.

The findings, by researchers at Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine under the title “Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial.”

Inflammation is an important contributor to lung damage and to progressive lung function decline in CF. In the study, researchers looked at the effects of a “cocktail” of multiple antioxidants on inflammation and health outcomes in CF patients.

“Single oral antioxidant formulations have been tested previously in CF with mixed results. However, there had not been a well-designed, randomized controlled trial of an antioxidant ‘cocktail’ that included multiple antioxidants in a single formulation,” Scott Sagel, MD, PhD, said in a University of Colorado news story. Sagel is the study’s first author and a pediatric pulmonologist at Children’s Colorado.

The 16-week study (NCT01859390) was conducted from September 2013 to October 2015 at 15 U.S. CF centers affiliated with the CF Foundation’s Therapeutics Development Network.

The study included 73 pancreatic-insufficient CF patients, 10 years and older (average age 22), who could not adequately absorb important dietary antioxidants such as beta-carotene, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), tocopherols (vitamin E), and selenium, which help neutralize inflammation in the body.

Participants received either capsules of antioxidant-enriched multivitamins, or control multivitamins without antioxidant enrichment. The capsules were designed specifically for people with difficulties in absorbing fats and proteins, like CF patients.

The investigational antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement, called AquADEKs-2, contains standard amounts of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) plus several antioxidants, including beta-carotene, mixed tocopherols, CoQ10, mixed carotenoids (lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin), and the minerals zinc and selenium.

Sagel and his team found that the antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement increased the concentration of antioxidants in the bloodstream, and temporarily reduced inflammation at four weeks, even though these results were not sustained through the end of the 16 weeks of the study.

In addition, antioxidant supplementation was found safe and well-tolerated by study participants.

Researchers also observed that antioxidant treatment appeared to prolong the time to the first pulmonary exacerbation requiring antibiotics, and also to reduce the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations altogether.

For the full article, please visit CF News Today.

Toothpaste ingredient may bust up cystic fibrosis biofilms

By Chris Waters and Sarina Gleason

A common antibacterial substance in toothpaste may combat life-threatening diseases such as cystic fibrosis when combined with an with an FDA-approved drug, researchers report.

Researchers have found that when triclosan, a substance that reduces or prevents bacteria from growing, combines with an antibiotic called tobramycin, it kills the cells that protect the CF bacteria, known as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, by up to 99.9 percent.

CF is a common genetic disease with one in every 2,500 to 3,500 people diagnosed with it at an early age. It results in a thick mucus in the lungs, which becomes a magnet for bacteria.

These bacteria are notoriously difficult to kill because a slimy barrier known as a biofilm, which allows the disease to thrive even when treated with antibiotics, protects them.

“The problem that we’re really tackling is finding ways to kill these biofilms,” says Chris Waters, lead author of the study and a microbiology professor at Michigan State University.

According to Waters, there are many common biofilm-related infections that people get, including ear infections and swollen, painful gums caused by gingivitis. But more serious, potentially fatal diseases join the ranks of CF including endocarditis, or inflammation of the heart, as well as infections from artificial hip and pacemaker implants.

Waters and his coauthors grew 6,000 biofilms in petri dishes, added in tobramycin along with many different compounds, to see what worked better at killing the bacteria. Twenty-five potential compounds were effective, but one stood out.

“It’s well known that triclosan, when used by itself, isn’t effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa,” says coauthor Alessandra Hunt, a postdoctoral associate of microbiology and molecular genetics. “But when I saw it listed as a possible compound to use with tobramycin, I was intrigued. We found triclosan was the one that worked every time.”

Triclosan has been used for more than 40 years in soaps, makeup, and other commercial products because of its antibacterial properties. Recently, the FDA ruled to limit its use in soaps and hand sanitizers due to insufficient data on its increased effectiveness and concern about overuse. Clear evidence has shown, though, that its use in toothpaste is safe and highly effective in fighting gingivitis, and it is still approved for use.

“Limiting its use is the right thing to do,” says coauthor Michael Maiden, a graduate student in medicine. “The key is to avoid creating resistance to a substance so when it’s found in numerous products, the chances of that happening increase.”

Tobramycin is currently the most widely used treatment for CF, but it typically doesn’t clear the lungs of infection, Waters says. Patients typically inhale the drug, yet still find themselves chronically infected their whole lives, eventually needing a lung transplant.

“Most transplants aren’t a viable option though for these patients and those who do have a transplant see a 50 percent failure rate within five years,” he says. “The other issue is that tobramycin can be toxic itself.” Known side effects from the drug include kidney toxicity and hearing loss.

“Our triclosan finding gives doctors another potential option and allows them to use significantly less of the tobramycin in treatment, potentially reducing its use by 100 times,” Hunt says.

Within the next year, Waters and his colleagues will begin testing the effectiveness of the combination therapy on mice with hopes of it heading to a human trial soon after since both drugs are already FDA approved.

Just brushing your teeth with toothpaste that has triclosan won’t help to treat lung infections though, Maiden says.

“We’re working to get this potential therapy approved so we can provide a new treatment option for CF patients, as well as treat other biofilm infections that are now untreatable. We think this can save lives,” he says.

The research appears in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

The National Institutes of Health, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, and Hunt for a Cure in Grand Rapids, Michigan funded the research.

Source: Michigan State University

Defining chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

By Valerie Waters and Keith Grimwood

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic, multi-system disease due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, leading to ineffective anion channel activity [1]. The resulting impaired mucociliary clearance permits initial acquisition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and, if untreated, the establishment of persistent infection in the CF airways. It has long been recognized that chronic infection, often characterized by a mucoid P. aeruginosa phenotype, is associated with more rapid lung function decline and earlier death in individuals with CF [[2], [3], [4]]. Defining chronic P. aeruginosa infection is, therefore, an important step in identifying CF patients most at risk of lung disease progression. Traditionally, the Leed’s criteria has been used to define chronicity (as having >50% of sputum cultures being P. aeruginosa positive in the preceding 12 months), as it is the only clinically validated definition [5]. However, the Leed’s criteria are difficult to implement in young children unable to provide sputum and further limited by the required number of sputum samples and follow-up time [6].

In this issue of the Journal, studies by Heltshe et al. and Boutin et al. aim to re-define what chronic P. aeruginosa infection means in CF. In a retrospective cohort study using data from the US CF Foundation Patient Registry, Heltshe et al. followed close to 6000 early-diagnosed CF children for approximately 6 years [7]. Two-thirds acquired P. aeruginosa infection and of those, 6% had an initial mucoid phenotype. Furthermore, the majority (87%) of children who developed mucoid infection did so before meeting the definition of chronic infection (at least 3 yearly quarters P. aeruginosa positive in the preceding year). Initial P. aeruginosa infection with a mucoid phenotype has been previously described and is a recognized risk factor for failure of antimicrobial eradication therapy [[8], [9], [10]]. Whether this initial acquisition of a mucoid phenotype represents prior adaptation of P. aeruginosa in the CF host (either undetected or transmitted from a patient with chronic infection) or simply infection with an environmental strain particularly well-suited to the CF airways, is as of yet unknown [11]. It is clear, though, that mucoid P. aeruginosa does have an adaptive advantage in early CF infection as mucoidy was associated with an almost three-fold increased risk of transition to chronic infection in this current study. Despite the presence of this risk factor, however, only 13% of P. aeruginosa infected patients went on to develop chronic infection. Although Heltshe et al. did not provide details as to eradication strategies used in this cohort, this low incidence of persistent infection does speak to the overall effectiveness of current antimicrobial treatment for early P. aeruginosa infection.

Boutin et al. took their investigation a step further by using molecular methods, specifically quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), to define chronic P. aeruginosa infection [12]. In their study, patients with chronic infection had significantly higher levels of P. aeruginosa as measured by qPCR compared to those with intermittent infection. A single P. aeruginosa qPCR measurement in sputum had a sensitivity of 84% (with a specificity of 85%) in detecting chronic infection using a threshold of 103.4 colony forming units (CFU)/ml. A single sputum PCR measure had the advantage of not requiring 12 months of culture results as per the Leed’s criteria [5]. Furthermore, in their small study sample size, PCR was more discriminatory than mucoidy status in predicting chronicity, not surprisingly, given that alginate production (conferring mucoidy) is only one of several virulence factors contributing to the establishment of persistent P. aeruginosa infection in CF [13]. When used in throat swab samples, qPCR had a considerably lower sensitivity (82%) and specificity (56%) in detecting chronic infection, likely due in part to the lower bacterial burden observed in this specimen, compared to sputum. The low specificity of PCR in this setting (positive PCR, negative culture) may reflect the fact that a molecular signal may precede culture positivity. Early detection of P. aeruginosa infection, before culture conversion, in CF patients was originally suggested decades ago using serologic and, more recently, molecular methods [[14], [15], [16]]. Serology, however, has proven disappointing at identifying early P. aeruginosa infection [17]. Nevertheless, early detection may still be possible using highly-sensitive PCR techniques for identifying lower airway P. aeruginosa infection in a young, non-expectorating child. In the study by Boutin et al., P. aeruginosa detection in throat swabs by PCR alone was linked to a positive culture in sputum in three-quarters of cases. Previous studies comparing oropharyngeal cultures to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures in children with CF demonstrated that oropharyngeal cultures had a positive predictive value of only 44%, but a negative predictive value of 95% in diagnosing lower airway P. aeruginosa infection [18]. Performing P. aeruginosa qPCR on culture negative throat swabs may further improve the diagnosis of lower airway infection in young children with CF who are unable to produce sputum, but this approach will still need to be validated by comparative studies employing BAL fluid samples. Unfortunately, using confirmatory induced sputum samples as suggested by Boutin et al., may produce unreliable results as these specimens are poor predictors of lower airway pathogens cultured from BAL specimens in young children with CF [19]. Finally, it is yet to be determined whether an earlier diagnosis of P. aeruginosa infection leads to improved eradication success rates and superior clinical outcomes.

In summary, the recent studies by Heltshe et al. and Boutin et al. further our understanding of how chronic P. aeruginosa infection develops in CF and how to better recognize it [7,12]. Ultimately, prevention of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and its deleterious effects on lung function and survival is the goal.

Original article in Journal of Cystic Fibrosis here.

NuvoAir Launches Air Next spirometer– and it uses Bluetooth!

by- Market Insiders, PR Newswire

“The Air Next uses Bluetooth Low Energy, which is a more efficient and cost-effective form of wireless technology, to instantly forward this data from the spirometer to a smartphone or tablet.”

If you’re like me and you very much dislike the extra ten seconds it takes out of your day to write down and journal your spirometry numbers, keep reading. And too, if you’re like me and you forget to bring that journal sheet with you to your doctor to show him your numbers, fear not- you don’t even have to leave your house. Just share it through the cloud. Yes, I know… another cloud.

For those of us who have received a transplant– I believe you know this well. After your surgery you are to use spirometry everyday. Everyday. For a few reasons we are told. To check for rejection, if you’re spirometry numbers are declining. To see, for both personal and medical purposes where you live (what your baseline FEV1 is). Then if you want to brag and show someone. Me: “Look mom, I am taking care of myself. Today I went up 3%.”
It’s very important. My doctors use my home numbers as if I’m doing my PFT’s at their office.
And lastly, this new Air Next looks cool! It’s not like the one hospitals give you that looks like you’re blowing into a 1950’s portal, that’s designed like the inside of a pinball machine. Seriously, check this thing out!

To keep reading visit the article below; also make sure to check out the images:
http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/nuvoair-launches-air-next-revolutionary-new-home-device-to-help-those-with-serious-lung-conditions-1001941321