Patients Will Test Digital Platform to Manage CF-Related Diabetes (CFRD)

By Janet Stewart

Attain Health will partner with DarioHealth, a digital health and big data solutions company, to test its Dario Engage platform to monitor blood sugar levels in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with CF-related diabetes (CFRD). Attain Health provides integrative health coaching for CF patients.

CFRD is an unusual form of diabetes estimated to affect some 30,000 CF patients in the United States and 70,000 worldwide. Experts say that the hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels) seen in CFRD patients results in higher rates of bacterial lung infections, and an increased risk of death.

“Effective diabetes management in cystic fibrosis patients is critical, as there is a sixfold increase in mortality among cystic fibrosis patients who have diabetes as compared to those who don’t. The increased risk of mortality from lung infections is correlated with hyperglycemic events,” Kat Quinn Porco, founder of Attain Health, said in a press release.

The three-month pilot study will include real-time tracking of 12 patients with CFRD using the Dario Engage digital platform, which includes a blood sugar monitoring device that transmits readings to the clinic. Attain Health will pay for access to the Dario Engage Dashboard to monitor participants.

The app is designed to help clinics detect blood sugar trends that could lead to disease progression. Disease management is also expected to be improved by DarioHealth’s ability to provide health education content via the app.

“We are very excited to move forward with DarioHealth in exploring the benefits of digital health solutions for patients living with cystic fibrosis. We chose to work with DarioHealth because of their platform’s patient-centric approach, ease of use, real-time actionable data, and their very favorable reputation in the diabetes market,” Porco said.

The companies plan to jointly present preliminary findings at the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference Oct.18-20 in Denver. Final results are expected in December.

Attain Health plans to obtain grant money for continuous use of the DarioEngage program with up to 200 patients a year.

“By piloting this study in partnership with Attain Health, DarioHealth is taking a leadership position in addressing CFRD by deploying what we believe are the best digital health management tools on the market today. This agreement and pilot study mark DarioHealth’s foray into chronic disease treatment markets that overlap with and expand beyond the treatment of diabetes, our company’s first treatment indication,” said Erez Raphael, president and CEO of DarioHealth.

Original article here.

Omega-3 Compound Reduces Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in New Pilot Study

By Jennifer Prince

A marine omega-3 compound comprising a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) sn1-monoacylglyceride (MAG-DHA) may act as an anti-inflammatory for subjects with cystic fibrosis, according to a new pilot study1 published in the journal Marine Drugs. In the study, MaxSimil (Neptune Wellness Solutions; Laval, QC, Canada) increased omega-3 red blood cell levels, helped moderate the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) to docosahexaenoic acid, and reduced key inflammatory biomarkers in subjects with cystic fibrosis. Continue reading Omega-3 Compound Reduces Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in New Pilot Study

How to Beat Brain Fog

By Wendy Caroline

As I sat down to write my column for this week, a massive wave of writer’s block hit me. This has been plaguing me for a while. Great timing, right?!

I started five different column pieces, each of which I would get a solid start on, and then nothing. I stopped understanding where the piece was going and didn’t like any of the words that I was writing. A few years ago, I started developing chronic fatigue. It started slowly, then quickly snowballed. In the past year, it has developed into brain fog. Very frustrating. I love using my brain for writing, reading, problem-solving, and critical thinking. It increasingly feels like cystic fibrosis is taking all these parts of my personality away from me. So here I am today, compiling a list of some tips and tricks that I use to combat brain fog and feel a little more like myself.

1. Don’t force it.

I can’t tell you how many times I have blocked my own brain by trying to force my way through brain fog. “Just do it.” How many times have we heard that? Unfortunately, at least for me, if I “just do it” and try to force myself to work through the brain fog, it just puts up more blocks. Then I get frustrated, and all I can think about is how I can’t think. It just spirals from there.

Cool, so how do you get past brain fog and still make your deadlines (because if you’re forcing it, that’s often why)? Be ahead of the game. I am guilty of this not being a natural instinct. In fact, I’m still learning how to do this. I used to be a procrastinator. I would thrive under the stress. My brain fog does not. Now I start writing and drafting at least a week before.

2. Get inspired.

One of the best ways to get inspired is to look to others. CF News Today columnist Brad Dell’s latest piece about brain fog directly inspired this post. It got me thinking about my own experience with brain fog, and how I have been insanely frustrated by its hold on my life. Find a piece of other people’s lives or the world around you that makes you think about your own. Capture it and go. I find that making a note of these inspirations in a note-taking app on my phone really helps because brain fog causes forgetfulness.

2. Create the mood.

Ditch the phone and whatever other fancy gizmos that cause a distraction. Find the type of environment that makes you feel inspired and ready to work. For me, that’s open space with lots of natural light and structured seating.

Next, put on some music — music that is going to make you focus and productive. My go-to is this Classical Essentials playlist on shuffle. This helps me drown out enough thoughts that I won’t get distracted without drowning out the thoughts that I need to work. Whatever you listen to, just make sure it doesn’t have words.

It’s also important to get your brain in the right mood. My brain fixates on chores and tasks that need doing, so I always make sure to get those done before I sit down to write. Also yoga and meditation, that’s some great stuff.

4. Let it flow.

A friend of mine gave me this very useful tip. Just let the words flow out of you, even if you don’t like them. When I use this technique, I have to write everything my heart desires and then walk away. Don’t reread it right then. You will get frustrated. Instead, write all you can and come back to it after you’ve had a solid break. For me, this is usually the next day. Your rough work can have a really good base but just needs to be re-worked.

I know that these tips and tricks are focused on writing, but I use the general ideas in all aspects of my life. Whether it is work, family, friends, or hobbies, brain fog can affect every aspect of your life. It’s one of the reasons that I haven’t been very active on any of my social media platforms — Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, and even my blog. As my brain fog developed into almost a daily issue, I took a step back and prioritized what I needed to focus on first. I truly believe that as these steps of beating brain fog become a habit, I will be able to handle more. Hopefully, you’ll see me around the internet again real soon.

» Find me on the internet at The Living, Breathing Wendy «

This article was originally published on CF News Today.

This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

Antioxidant Supplement Helps Cystic Fibrosis Patients, Study Finds

By Carolina Henriques

A special formulation of an antioxidant-enriched multivitamin helped decrease the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to a new study.

The findings, by researchers at Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine under the title “Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial.”

Inflammation is an important contributor to lung damage and to progressive lung function decline in CF. In the study, researchers looked at the effects of a “cocktail” of multiple antioxidants on inflammation and health outcomes in CF patients.

“Single oral antioxidant formulations have been tested previously in CF with mixed results. However, there had not been a well-designed, randomized controlled trial of an antioxidant ‘cocktail’ that included multiple antioxidants in a single formulation,” Scott Sagel, MD, PhD, said in a University of Colorado news story. Sagel is the study’s first author and a pediatric pulmonologist at Children’s Colorado.

The 16-week study (NCT01859390) was conducted from September 2013 to October 2015 at 15 U.S. CF centers affiliated with the CF Foundation’s Therapeutics Development Network.

The study included 73 pancreatic-insufficient CF patients, 10 years and older (average age 22), who could not adequately absorb important dietary antioxidants such as beta-carotene, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), tocopherols (vitamin E), and selenium, which help neutralize inflammation in the body.

Participants received either capsules of antioxidant-enriched multivitamins, or control multivitamins without antioxidant enrichment. The capsules were designed specifically for people with difficulties in absorbing fats and proteins, like CF patients.

The investigational antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement, called AquADEKs-2, contains standard amounts of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) plus several antioxidants, including beta-carotene, mixed tocopherols, CoQ10, mixed carotenoids (lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin), and the minerals zinc and selenium.

Sagel and his team found that the antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement increased the concentration of antioxidants in the bloodstream, and temporarily reduced inflammation at four weeks, even though these results were not sustained through the end of the 16 weeks of the study.

In addition, antioxidant supplementation was found safe and well-tolerated by study participants.

Researchers also observed that antioxidant treatment appeared to prolong the time to the first pulmonary exacerbation requiring antibiotics, and also to reduce the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations altogether.

For the full article, please visit CF News Today.

Bustle for muscle

by Brennen Reeves

A mom who played college basketball. A dad who entered the army at eighteen. A brother who received a football scholarship after high school. That’s my family.
Me, I like theatre and acting.

I like to workout. I can do most anything, though I tire when I run. Running, not a daunting task for anyone else in my family- nor was the ability to put on weight or the ability to gain muscles. Both were and still remain a struggle of mine today. I understand the weight section- I have CF, my heart beats faster than other hearts, my digestive tract is not on track and diabetes is well, diabetes. Sadly, I cannot understand why I cannot gain muscle. Or turn the muscle that now exists to a lean quality.
I exercise just as much as the next person.

My parents and brother, they’re athletes. Sure, being athletic doesn’t necessarily mean you possess muscle, but my family did. I retained some of those genes. I played baseball, I owned a lacrosse stick, I love to golf. I count that as a sport (so what if I ride in the cart?).
I have coordination.

I received a bilateral lung transplant over 7 years ago. Within that gap, and day by day I become more flexible, stronger, newly energized, with no luck of further muscle growth. The weight is there. Up about thirty-five pounds. But how come there is no significant muscle gain, or the leanness to which I work for? Could it be a diet issue? Because the thirty, sixty, ninety day routine after these 7 years has been ineffective. I still come up short and this lets me down, my physical appearance.

I’m 5’6” and weigh around 120lbs. My body is symmetrically balanced. I have new lungs. There’s the determination- so why this outcome or lack of?
This is not a lecturer post but more a collaborative question- what is your secret? Do you have a secret? Is it a secret?

Sure, I still have CF, yes, my heart still beats faster than other hearts, yes, my digestive tract needs aligning, and well, diabetes still remains diabetes. Just about every other facet since my surgery has changed, emotionally, physically, etc., and my body is still present just with a little more weight with nowhere to go.

I challenge this. Could it be the severed nerves under my breast plate have yet to heal or reconnect, making it harder to attract muscle in this area? The numbness from my shoulders on down through the wrists lose feelings during most points of the day, is that a sign indicating powerless limbs?

“7years. Brennen your body needs more time to heal”
Ok.
—–
Wait,
or could it just be my body?

Advancing the GI frontier for patients with CF

The care of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) has seen amazing advances in the past few years, made in part through the development of CFTR modulators. However, the recognition of the frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in our patients is just beginning to emerge. Only recently have publications noted the excessively high frequency of GI issues. Continue reading Advancing the GI frontier for patients with CF

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 176: Importance of Nutrition for CF Patients

In this podcast, we meet Molly Bigford, a Registered Dietitian for the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care Team in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Born and raised in Michigan, Molly began working with hospitalized adult patients with cystic Continue reading Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 176: Importance of Nutrition for CF Patients

Green Smoothie Recipe – Healthy and Caloric!

By Ella Balasa

Rise and shine to start another day! Like most of us, I have limited time in my morning routine, AND I tend to slack on getting my greens for the day. Occasionally, I will eat a salad with my lunch or dinner, but that isn’t enough. The saying also goes… an apple a day keeps the doctor away…That’s definitely something we as CF patients want! Continue reading Green Smoothie Recipe – Healthy and Caloric!

Cystic Fibrosis Step by Step: Building a Treatment Routine

In this video, Gunnar stresses the importance of building a routine in order to stay compliant with his treatments and remain healthy. He also reminds listeners to keep an open dialogue with their doctors and support teams at CF Clinics. Continue reading Cystic Fibrosis Step by Step: Building a Treatment Routine

OWN IT: Cystic Fibrosis Survival Rates in the United States vs. Canada

A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine concluded that “the median age of survival [is] 10 years higher [for CF patients] in Canada than the United States.”

If you’re wrapped up in the world of cystic fibrosis news like I am then you’ve probably seen this study floating around the Internet for the Continue reading OWN IT: Cystic Fibrosis Survival Rates in the United States vs. Canada