Vitamin D3 deficiency and its association with nasal polyposis in patients with cystic fibrosis

This trial ascertained if the deficiency of vitamin D3 (VD3) correlated with the presence of nasal polyposis (NP) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). VD3 deficiency appeared to be related to the presence of nasal polyps in the patients with CRS and in the patients with CF in a similar manner. It was inferred that the lower the level of serum VD3, the more severe the mucosal disease was disclosed in the imaging studies and the more frequent microbial colonization of the patients with CF and the patients with CRS. Continue reading Vitamin D3 deficiency and its association with nasal polyposis in patients with cystic fibrosis

Behaviors, experience and health care utilization in young women with CF

In this issue of the journal, Kazmerski et al. describe the sexual and reproductive health concerns and related healthcare utilization of young women with CF ages 15–24 years at five CF centers compared to that of the general population [[1][2]]. They found that the sexual activity of young women with CF mimics the behaviors of non-CF counterparts; however women with CF have less access to sexual and reproductive health information and services. Continue reading Behaviors, experience and health care utilization in young women with CF

CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 67: CIRCUIT TRAINING 2

For people with cystic fibrosis, getting “back” into shape is a common occurrence. Because of the nature of the disease, patients often experience set backs in both their health and fitness routines. But, exercise is an important and essential part of remaining compliant with treatments and medications in order to live a longer, healthier life with CF.  Continue reading CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 67: CIRCUIT TRAINING 2

Low Level of Zinc Ions in Lungs Contribute to Buildup of Mucus in CF

When two channels that are supposed to move chloride and sodium ions out of cells in the lungs fail to function properly, it leads to the mucus buildup seen in cystic fibrosis.

Japanese researchers have discovered that the channel dysfunctions also reduce the amount of zinc ions going into the lungs, further contributing to the thick mucus accumulation.

Their study, published in the journal EBioMedicine, is titled “Zinc Deficiency via a Splice Switch in Zinc Importer ZIP2/SLC39A2 Causes Cystic Fibrosis-Associated MUC5AC Hypersecretion in Airway Epithelial Cells.Continue reading Low Level of Zinc Ions in Lungs Contribute to Buildup of Mucus in CF

CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 66: CIRCUIT TRAINING 1

For people with cystic fibrosis, getting “back” into shape is a common occurrence. Because of the nature of the disease, patients often experience set backs in both their health and fitness routines. But, exercise is an important and essential part of remaining compliant with treatments and medications in order to live a longer, healthier life with CF. Continue reading CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 66: CIRCUIT TRAINING 1

Advancing the GI frontier for patients with CF

The care of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) has seen amazing advances in the past few years, made in part through the development of CFTR modulators. However, the recognition of the frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in our patients is just beginning to emerge. Only recently have publications noted the excessively high frequency of GI issues. Continue reading Advancing the GI frontier for patients with CF

Introduction of New Therapies Affects Pregnancy Rates in Women With CF

The overall rate at which women with cystic fibrosis are becoming pregnant dropped slightly in recent years — coinciding with the introduction of CFTR modulators and the clinical trials that led to their approval as CF therapies — but appears to be rising again to pre-trial levels, a study reports.  Continue reading Introduction of New Therapies Affects Pregnancy Rates in Women With CF

8 Tips For Protecting Your Lungs From Unhealthy Air

If you have a chronic lung condition, you’ll need to protect your lungs from being further irritated by unhealthy air. We’ve put together a list of ways to help protect your lungs against unhealthy air using information from the American Lung Association.

Check the daily air pollutant forecasts. 
There are sites on the Internet and cellphone apps where you can find out the levels of air pollution in your local area. Checking these daily can help you plan your week, helping you avoid being outside or limit your time outside when the pollution levels are high.

Try both indoor and outdoor exercise
If pollutions levels are high then avoid exercising outside. Either visit your local gym or exercise at home. Indoor shopping malls are good locations for indoor walking if you can’t go outside. Try not to exercise in places where there is a high level of traffic — traffic fumes can pollute areas up to a third of a mile away.

Reduce your carbon footprint. 
Using less electricity at home is one way to reduce your carbon footprint which helps to create healthy air for everyone. Reducing the number of car trips you make will also help. Travel by bicycle or public transport, or car share instead. Walk short distances instead of jumping in the car.

Don’t burn trash or wood. 
The ash and soot caused by the burning of wood and trash contribute to particle pollution in the atmosphere.

Don’t use gasoline-powered yard equipment. 
Gasoline-powered lawn mowers, trimmers, and leaf blowers all add to the air pollution and may irritate your lungs while carrying out your yard chores.

Encourage others to reduce their carbon footprint. 
Pressurize your local schools to run their buses according to the Clean School Bus Campaign. That means not leaving the engine running while waiting outside buildings and applying for funding for projects helping to reduce emissions.

Ask friends, family, and neighbors to reduce their energy use.

Stay away from smokers.
Don’t allow anyone to smoke in your home or place of work. Try to avoid outdoor places where people smoke cigarettes.

Be an advocate.
Be an advocate for healthier air, supporting local and national campaigns to improve the environment and reduce emissions.

Original article: https://cysticfibrosisnewstoday.com/2017/12/12/8-tips-for-protecting-your-lungs-from-unhealthy-air-2/?utm_source=Cystic+Fibrosis&utm_campaign=a772c5a83f-RSS_THURSDAY_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_b075749015-a772c5a83f-71418393

Therapy for Reducing P. Aeruginosa Lung Infections Planned Phase 1 Trial

Arch Biopartners recently completed a good manufacturing practice (GMP) production campaign for AB569, a potential inhalation treatment for antibiotic-resistant bacterial lung infections in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other conditions. The campaign, intended to ensure the quality of the investigative therapy, was directed by Dalton Pharma Services.

AB569 is composed of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and sodium nitrite, two compounds approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in people. AB569 can be administered alone or in combination with other compounds to treat multi-drug resistant bacterial infections that can cause reduced lung function.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most common bacterial infections in patients with respiratory diseases, including CF, COPD, and pneumonia.

In preclinical studies, AB569 was shown to be capable of killing drug-resistant bacteria like P. aeruginosa and other common pathogens associated with chronic lung infections.

The company also announced that a Phase 1 clinical trial to investigate the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of AB569, planned to start in January, will be conducted at the Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center (CVAMC). According to an Arch Biopartners press release, Ralph Panos, chief of medicine at CVAMC, will lead the trial.

Three escalating doses of nebulized AB569 will be used to evaluate tolerance to the treatment in about 25 healthy volunteers. Each will be given a single administration of nebulized AB569  to characterize the pharmacokinetic profile of plasma nitrite and nitrate metabolites, exhaled nitric oxide, and circulating hemoglobin.

Pharmacokinetics studies how a drug is absorbed, distributed and metabolized in, and expelled by, the body.

Should the Phase 1 trial in volunteers be successful, Arch Biopartners plans to move its AB569 program into a Phase 2 trial to test its effectiveness in treating chronic P.aeruginosa infections in COPD patients.

AB569 received orphan drug status by the FDA in November 2015 as a potential treatment of P. aeruginosa lung infections in CF patients. Orphan drug status is given to investigative medicines intended for people with rare diseases to speed their development and testing.

Original article: https://cysticfibrosisnewstoday.com/2017/12/12/arch-biopartners-readies-ab569-potential-treatment-for-cf-copd-lung-infections-for-phase-1-trial/

The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC)

Women with CF, we need your expertise and opinions!

Become a member of the CF-Patient Task Force to discuss sexual and reproductive health issues that affect women with CF.  As patients with CF live longer, CFReSHC is committed to patient-engaged research through partnerships with people with CF, researchers, and advocates.  Continue reading The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC)