CF and Menopause—I have questions…

By Georgia Brown

As a woman with Cystic Fibrosis, at 47, I am considered old—but it is a title I relish.  It means I have weathered the CF storm and I look at each birthday as an accomplishment.  But as I enter the next phase of my life, I find I have more questions than answers.

While I don’t fear menopause necessarily, I do fear embarking on this life changing phase without understanding how CF puts its unique twist on it.  And that is why I am glad that I have found the Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive and Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC).  Each month the group meets to discuss issues specific to women with CF.  Then CFReSHC uses the feedback from meeting participants to help shape future CF research.  This is one way, we, as patients, pave the way for improved sexual and reproductive healthcare.  

The next virtual meeting “Hormones Across the Lifespan” will be Thursday, February 22, 2018 from 11 am to 1:00 pm EST.  Dr. Raksha Jain of the University of Texas Southwestern will discuss how hormones affect women with CF from puberty to menopause.  Then, the CF women in attendance, will break into smaller groups to discuss personal stories and identify the top three hormone-related topics that need further research.  The meeting is open to all women with CF in the United States.  For more information on CFReSHC and for login information from your laptop, or mobile device, email CFReSHC at Women who attend receive a $25 gift card from Amazon.  

New Promising Results from Phase 3 of Combination Therapy

Findings from a phase 3 trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of tezacaftor in combination with ivacaftor in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who were homozygous for the Phe508del mutation were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The Phe508del mutation has been known to result in greatly reduced conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity and a loss of chloride secretion, which can lead to impaction of mucus in the airways, gastrointestinal tract, and exocrine organs, with the potential for severe clinical consequences including gradual loss of lung function, nutritional deficits, pulmonary exacerbations, and respiratory failure. It is the most prevalent CFTR mutation worldwide, and affects approximately 46% of American CF patients.

Previous data has shown Ivacaftor’s association with a rate of progressive decline in lung function that is lower than that in untreated patients. In a phase 2 clinical trial involving patients who were homozygous for the Phe508del mutation or heterozygous for the Phe508del and G551D mutations, when combined with the investigational CFTR corrector tezacaftor, it has exhibited enhanced CFTR function and improved lung function.

In August, just one month removed from Vertex’s announcement of positive datafrom Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies, Rare Disease Report covered the acceptance of applications for the use of the tezacaftor/ivacaftor combination treatment in this patient population by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA).

The phase 3 trial enrolled a total of 510 patients 12 years and older with CF who were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation at 91 sites in the U.S., Canada, and Europe from January 30, 2015 to January 20, 2017. Patients were randomly assigned to be administered either tezacaftor and ivacaftor (administered as a fixed-dose combination tablet containing 100 mg of tezacaftor and 150 mg of ivacaftor in the morning and a tablet containing 150 mg of ivacaftor in the evening) combination therapy or placebo for 24 weeks.

In total, 475 patients completed the full 24 weeks of the trial, with 93.6% (n=235) in the tezacaftor-ivacaftor group and 93% (n=240) in the placebo group. While no significant difference in the body mass index (BMI) was experienced between the groups at week 24, the use of the combination therapy led to a significantly greater absolute change from baseline in the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) than placebo. Despite advances in standard-of-care therapy, patients with CF continue to lose lung function at a rate of an estimated 1% to 3% per year. This trial exhibited a significant effect of the combination therapy compared to the placebo, as the mean absolute change from baseline in FEV1 through week 24 was 3.4 percentage points in the former, compared to 0.6 in the latter.

The most common adverse events (AEs) among the enrolled patients included infective pulmonary exacerbation, cough, headache, nasopharyngitis, increased sputum production, pyrecia, hemoptysis, oropharyngeal pain, and fatigue. The incidence of AEs was similar in both the group for combination therapy and the placebo group, however, those treated with lumacaftor-ivacaftor in the phase 3 did not experience an increased incidence of respiratory events (33 patients [13.1%] vs. 41 patients [15.9%]).

This improved safety profile of the tezacaftor-ivacaftor combination supports its use in a broad range of patients with CF, and, if approved, the therapy will be the third of Vertex’s drugs approved for CF patients, and the second intended specifically to treat patients with F508del mutations (Orkami [lumacaftor/ivacaftor]).

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