Antioxidant Supplement Helps Cystic Fibrosis Patients, Study Finds

By Carolina Henriques

A special formulation of an antioxidant-enriched multivitamin helped decrease the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), according to a new study.

The findings, by researchers at Children’s Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine, were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine under the title “Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial.”

Inflammation is an important contributor to lung damage and to progressive lung function decline in CF. In the study, researchers looked at the effects of a “cocktail” of multiple antioxidants on inflammation and health outcomes in CF patients.

“Single oral antioxidant formulations have been tested previously in CF with mixed results. However, there had not been a well-designed, randomized controlled trial of an antioxidant ‘cocktail’ that included multiple antioxidants in a single formulation,” Scott Sagel, MD, PhD, said in a University of Colorado news story. Sagel is the study’s first author and a pediatric pulmonologist at Children’s Colorado.

The 16-week study (NCT01859390) was conducted from September 2013 to October 2015 at 15 U.S. CF centers affiliated with the CF Foundation’s Therapeutics Development Network.

The study included 73 pancreatic-insufficient CF patients, 10 years and older (average age 22), who could not adequately absorb important dietary antioxidants such as beta-carotene, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), tocopherols (vitamin E), and selenium, which help neutralize inflammation in the body.

Participants received either capsules of antioxidant-enriched multivitamins, or control multivitamins without antioxidant enrichment. The capsules were designed specifically for people with difficulties in absorbing fats and proteins, like CF patients.

The investigational antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement, called AquADEKs-2, contains standard amounts of fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) plus several antioxidants, including beta-carotene, mixed tocopherols, CoQ10, mixed carotenoids (lutein, lycopene and zeaxanthin), and the minerals zinc and selenium.

Sagel and his team found that the antioxidant-enriched multivitamin supplement increased the concentration of antioxidants in the bloodstream, and temporarily reduced inflammation at four weeks, even though these results were not sustained through the end of the 16 weeks of the study.

In addition, antioxidant supplementation was found safe and well-tolerated by study participants.

Researchers also observed that antioxidant treatment appeared to prolong the time to the first pulmonary exacerbation requiring antibiotics, and also to reduce the frequency of pulmonary exacerbations altogether.

For the full article, please visit CF News Today.

Bustle for muscle

by Brennen Reeves

A mom who played college basketball. A dad who entered the army at eighteen. A brother who received a football scholarship after high school. That’s my family.
Me, I like theatre and acting.

I like to workout. I can do most anything, though I tire when I run. Running, not a daunting task for anyone else in my family- nor was the ability to put on weight or the ability to gain muscles. Both were and still remain a struggle of mine today. I understand the weight section- I have CF, my heart beats faster than other hearts, my digestive tract is not on track and diabetes is well, diabetes. Sadly, I cannot understand why I cannot gain muscle. Or turn the muscle that now exists to a lean quality.
I exercise just as much as the next person.

My parents and brother, they’re athletes. Sure, being athletic doesn’t necessarily mean you possess muscle, but my family did. I retained some of those genes. I played baseball, I owned a lacrosse stick, I love to golf. I count that as a sport (so what if I ride in the cart?).
I have coordination.

I received a bilateral lung transplant over 7 years ago. Within that gap, and day by day I become more flexible, stronger, newly energized, with no luck of further muscle growth. The weight is there. Up about thirty-five pounds. But how come there is no significant muscle gain, or the leanness to which I work for? Could it be a diet issue? Because the thirty, sixty, ninety day routine after these 7 years has been ineffective. I still come up short and this lets me down, my physical appearance.

I’m 5’6” and weigh around 120lbs. My body is symmetrically balanced. I have new lungs. There’s the determination- so why this outcome or lack of?
This is not a lecturer post but more a collaborative question- what is your secret? Do you have a secret? Is it a secret?

Sure, I still have CF, yes, my heart still beats faster than other hearts, yes, my digestive tract needs aligning, and well, diabetes still remains diabetes. Just about every other facet since my surgery has changed, emotionally, physically, etc., and my body is still present just with a little more weight with nowhere to go.

I challenge this. Could it be the severed nerves under my breast plate have yet to heal or reconnect, making it harder to attract muscle in this area? The numbness from my shoulders on down through the wrists lose feelings during most points of the day, is that a sign indicating powerless limbs?

“7years. Brennen your body needs more time to heal”
Ok.
—–
Wait,
or could it just be my body?

More Than 16 mn Fatal Lung Infections in 2015! Know these 5 Foods to Keep Your Lungs Strong

http://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/more-than-16-mn-fatal-lung-infections-in-2015-know-these-5-foods-to-keep-your-lungs-strong-1722266

Countries including India, China, Nigeria, Pakistan and Indonesia, accounted for over 16 million or half of the global estimated cases of a fatal lung infection called Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) in 2015, researchers led by Continue reading More Than 16 mn Fatal Lung Infections in 2015! Know these 5 Foods to Keep Your Lungs Strong

What Living on My Own Has Taught Me

By Ella Balasa

Living alone has its perks and its downsides too. It can get quiet at times. There isn’t someone’s presence here constantly. The upside is having the flexibility of doing what I want on my own time. Although I have recently come to realize, more responsibility means less free time to do whatever I want whenever. Having CF, this means a lot more responsibilities. Many young adults are living with their parents through their early 20s. This is something I did as well, and have recently made the transition to being on my own. There are a few things I have learned so far:

Time management is important. I have to think through my day before it happens. Fitting in 3-4 breathing treatments a day is an absolute must, so everything else I do in a day has to be worked around when I do those. I have to think about when I need to do certain things to be able to get places at certain times and to accomplish what I need to do in a day. Nutrition is also extremely important, and to make sure I’m having healthy meals, not grabbing take-out on the way home or out, pre-planning meals is something I have to think about. For example, taking something out of the freezer the night before, so I can prepare it in a crockpot the next morning to be ready to eat by that evening. When I plan things I am able to accomplish more, in a more efficient way.

I’ve learned the meaning of discipline. This goes along with time management. There are times where I can’t go meet up with a friend because I need to be home doing treatments, cleaning nebulizing vials (we all know how tedious and annoying this can be) grocery shopping or taking care of other responsibilities. I no longer have my parents nagging me and reminding me to do tasks that I need to complete. I have to take the initiative and do without being told.

I have a greater appreciation for my parents. I now realize how much my mom did for me. Mostly cooking meals, cleaning the house, taking out the trash, and just her caring nature. When she would randomly bring me a snack as I typed away at my computer. It’s the little things like that I miss the most.

Freedom. This is the best positive aspect to the whole situation. I do love feeling the sense of independence and accomplishment that comes with figuring things out on my own, planning my days, and getting things done in the time they need to be. I wouldn’t trade it. It is nice to not have constant reminders from parents and nagging about things I’m doing wrong or what I should be doing. And I feel proud that I am able to live my own life despite the extra daily challenges.

Although it is more work to be responsible for myself, I think it’s a very important step for young adults including those with CF. Parents of children with CF can be quite overprotective and may have a harder time letting go and allowing young adults to manage their own lives. It teaches responsibility and discipline and in the long run is beneficial for CF adults as they are better prepared to take on more obstacles and challenges with managing life with CF.

Green Smoothie Recipe – Healthy and Caloric!

By Ella Balasa

Rise and shine to start another day! Like most of us, I have limited time in my morning routine, AND I tend to slack on getting my greens for the day. Occasionally, I will eat a salad with my lunch or dinner, but that isn’t enough. The saying also goes… an apple a day keeps the doctor away…That’s definitely something we as CF patients want! Continue reading Green Smoothie Recipe – Healthy and Caloric!

My Gluten Free Experiment Results

By Amy Braid

As I mentioned last month, I read Wheat Belly by William Davis MD and decided to go gluten free for 30 days.  Well my 30 days is up…

I felt no significant difference eating gluten vs not eating gluten.  I did eat a lot more fruits and vegetables and yogurt which I loved.  And I was hungry a lot more too.  But I was eating lots more quantity.  The first week or two I did feel less bloated after eating, and my wrist problems seemed to be diminishing.  But I can’t say that for certain since I was not using it as much as I normally do either.  By the time I hit the two week mark I felt exactly how I did before I started.

One thing that did change significantly…my fasting blood sugars.  They were all in the normal range for those 30 days.  But my post exercise blood sugars were awful.  I crashed every single day I exercised, and that was 4-5 days a week.  Not good.

I only cheated once.  Hand to God I swear.  It was the last week.  We were going to my mother in laws for dinner, and since I make fresh bread a lot this time of year and , I made some the night before.  I had to try a bite when it was finished!  Just a small bite, and I didn’t have any at dinner the next day.  And to be honest I didn’t feel anything negative side effects from sneaking a piece.

So for me I don’t think gluten has any noticeable impact on me.  I was a little disappointed, I won’t lie.  I did hope my lungs would feel better and my wrist would feel amazing and I would not bloat like a balloon with meals.  The first 10 days or so I was excited that I might get there.  But in the end, nothing.  So it is back to gluten for me.  But modified, I will eat less, avoid all the snacks and processed foods (for the most part) and try to maintain the healthy fruits and veggies I was eating for that month.

All in all I don’t think this experiment was a total bust.  It was a learning experience and I tried some new foods I didn’t think I would like, and ended up loving them.  So win win for me!

Trying to Reduce Inflammation for Myself

By Amy Braid

A couple of weeks ago Andrea posted this blog about her experience with going gluten free.  She read a book called Wheat Belly by William Davis MD.  She talked about how much better her joints feel having tried this.   It sounded great!

Continue reading Trying to Reduce Inflammation for Myself

A Unique Approach to the Treatment of EPI in Cystic Fibrosis

Of all the pancreatic enzyme medicines doctors can prescribe, PERTZYE®(pancrelipase) is the only choice that contains pancreatic enzymes buffered with bicarbonate.* Bicarbonate is a substance normally secreted along with pancreatic enzymes that helps them work efficiently to digest food. Continue reading A Unique Approach to the Treatment of EPI in Cystic Fibrosis

Gunnar Esiason, Own It: Don’t Say That to Me

This blog post touches on the invisible disease side of things. I know I went pretty deeply into that with my little story about almost getting tased on an airplane ride from Boston to New York, but this is a little bit of a different Continue reading Gunnar Esiason, Own It: Don’t Say That to Me

Top Ten Perks of CF–Guest Blog by Jeanie Hanley

This is Jeanie Hanley. I’m not really sure that these are THE top 10 perks but they’re my top ones. Since David Letterman just retired and the “Top 10” were his comedic shtick, I write these in his honor, loosely of course. Keep in mind that I did not have a team of comedic writers working on Continue reading Top Ten Perks of CF–Guest Blog by Jeanie Hanley