The open door policy – An important and under-recognized activity of the adult CF center

By Anna Sze Tai and Sue Morey

Improvement in survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a substantial increase in numbers of the adults with CF past few decades [12]. In many parts of the world, the number of adults now exceeds the numbers of children with CF [12]. Adults with CF face the daily challenge in balancing education, work and family commitments with their disease management. Patients often need to contact the Adult CF specialist team for advice on disease management and coordination of care around their work and family time-table. Current ECFS guideline recommends patients have ready access to the CF center for telephone advice for emergency management or consultation [34]. The ‘open-door’ policy of adult CF centers is an important component of ambulatory care in adults with CF, ensuring a timely and expert-level response to patient queries. Management of unscheduled patient-initiated contacts is an important and often under-recognized function of the adult CF team. There is a paucity of data on the nature and frequency of these unscheduled contacts and their potential impact (and demands) on the organization of the CF team.

In this issue of the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, Burnet et al. reported the results of a two-staged prospective study of unplanned patient-initiated contacts in a single adult CF center (n = 410 patients) [5]. During the first stage, all patient-initiated contacts were prospectively recorded over a four-month period. Four physicians and three nurses prospectively documented how and why patients contacted the team and the time spent responding to these requests. During the second stage, contacts generated from a subset of 212 patients were prospectively recorded to explore the association between contact frequency and disease severity.

During the first stage, 259/410 (65%) patients initiated 1067 contacts over 4 months, averaging 13.3 contacts per day. Average time spent addressing patient contacts by all participants combined was 8 h and 7 min per work week. This was likely an underestimate given not all team members (e.g. allied health specialists) who might be contacted by patients participated, and data collection was limited to working hours during weekdays. Nevertheless, the result confirmed that managing unscheduled contacts added a significant workload to the CF team. Factors associated with greater contacts (≥5 contacts/year) included female sex and greater disease severity, reflected in severe airflow obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 30% predicted), ≥ 5 physician visits/year and ≥ 1 hospital admission/year.

The frequency of unscheduled contact in adults with CF was markedly higher than that observed amongst high-risk COPD patients, reflecting the greater healthcare demand of adults with CF [6]. Interestingly, only <20% of requests were related to medical issues (e.g. exacerbations), whereas the bulk of requests were related to daily management issues (e.g. script renewal), intravenous antibiotic requests, administrative queries and non-urgent miscellaneous matters. This perhaps reflects that the adult CF center has generally provided comprehensive, primary up to expert-level tertiary care to their adults with CF. The adult CF center can be viewed by the patient as ‘the one-stop shop’ for both their CF and non-CF related healthcare needs. Patients may not be aware of the need for a family physician for their non-CF related healthcare needs, including travel vaccinations, women health issues, age-specific screening (e.g. mammograms, monitoring for hypertension).

This is the first study which demonstrates the significant burden of unplanned contacts on the organization of the adult CF centre. The strength of the study is the prospective design which enables differentiation between planned and unplanned contacts. There was a comprehensive recording of response time in the clear majority of patient contacts (>95%) by the team members as they carry out their day-to-day services within a large CF centre which is an impressive undertaking. The key limitation is the single centre nature of the study which limits its comparability to other centres in other health settings internationally. Nevertheless, Burnet et al. has clearly revealed the burden of unscheduled contacts and highlighted the need for more efficient management strategies. Firstly, development of an effective centralised triaging system (e.g. collective ‘CF Team’ email inbox and phone line) managed by experienced CF staff who prioritise and streamline all incoming requests to appropriate team members can maximize efficiency of the CF team. Secondly, involvement of administrative staff to assist with relevant non-medical requests (e.g. clinic rescheduling, etc) will lighten the burden on the clinical team. Thirdly, ultilisation of new telecommunication and health informatics technologies can potentially improve communication and data transparency. Telehealth technologies (e.g. Smartphone apps, Skype or WhatsApp) have already shown significant promise in improving patient access to care and early treatment in CF, particularly in setting where distance from centre to the patients is considerable and pop-in clinics are likely to be impractical [[7][8][9]]. Some of these telehealth technologies can potentially serve as communication platforms to provide education resources on commonly-asked questions.

To continue reading please visit: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1569199318306982

Patient-reported outcomes: Time for a new approach?

By Janice Abbott

Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measurement (e.g. health-related quality of life questionnaires, symptom diaries) can provide a standardized, valid and reliable way of gaining the patients’ perspective on ‘how they are’ or the benefits and limitations of a specific intervention. The insights that patients have concerning their health are important given that aspects of patient-reported quality of life are independent predictors of survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) [1]. Regulatory authorities require the inclusion of PROs in clinical trials as an additional outcome parameter and PRO information is becoming important in labelling claims. It is noteworthy that the top 10 research questions, reached by global consensus of patient and healthcare providers, all require the inclusion of CF-specific PROs to achieve meaningful answers [2]. This represents a significant paradigm shift but capturing data that matters to patients, families and clinicians is challenging. Two of the persistent challenges in CF PRO measurement are a) the development and use of technologies to enable efficient administration, accurate scoring, and the correct interpretation of data and b) being able to accurately measure PROs (or parental proxy assessment) across the entire CF lifespan. These important issues are considered by two papers in this issue of the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis [34].

PRO measurement largely remains a research endeavour with little uptake in clinical practice. Administering, scoring and interpreting PROs in a busy clinic is difficult. It requires staff time and expertise and the results are not instantly accessible to steer a discussion with the patient or to aid clinical decision making. Paper-based data collection suffers from missing, unreadable data that is prone to scoring/mathematical error. The development of electronic PRO (ePRO) technologies is immensely important in clinical practice and for endpoint assessment in clinical trials. It is a cost-saving, patient-friendly approach to PRO assessment: data collection can occur in clinic, the patient’s home, workplace or school. Results can be added to a patient’s electronic medical file, alerts triggered by problematic scores and clinicians can track patient/parent-reported symptom/event data over time. Importantly, electronic data capture enhances the integrity and accuracy of the data, makes it logistically easier to collect repeated assessments (daily or at several points over a trial), and is preferred over paper-based data collection by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

There is growing evidence that paper and electronic versions of PROs typically provide comparable data but this requires psychometric evaluation if transferring an original paper-based questionnaire to an electronic mode of administration. Solé and colleagues have demonstrated measurement equivalence with paper and electronic administrations of the Cystic Fibrosis Questionnaire-Revised (CFQ-R teen/adult version) [3]. The e-CFQ-R web version is linked to an online database that can be adapted for any electronic devise (smartphone, tablet, computer). Immediately the patient completes the questionnaire, results are sent to the healthcare team and the data are saved in a centralized, protected database. Real-time patient-reported data are available to the clinician as an adjunct to clinical data. Access to the English and Spanish versions are by independent web addresses provided in the paper. Ultimately, the integration of PRO data within electronic care records as developed by Peckham et al. [5], or in CF patient registries would enable efficient patient care and longitudinal research endeavours.

There is a lack of PROs that can be used as endpoints in early intervention studies in CF. Such instruments are time-consuming and painstakingly difficult to develop so the research of Edwards et al. reporting on the initial development of a CF-specific, parent-reported instrument for children 0–11 years is welcome [4]. The need for an effective way of data collection is also considered. The instrument takes the form of an electronic (web-based data capture), observational sign/symptom diary containing 17 respiratory and activity signs that parents report the presence or absence of. Results suggest that children aged 7 to 11 years are best reporting for themselves, therefore observational reporting by parents should focus on young children aged 0 to 6 years. Considerable evaluation has yet to determine the final instrument but the development of the scale follows FDA guidance enabling its acceptance as a clinical trial endpoint in infants and young children with CF.

Over the last twenty years we have learned a great deal about measuring patient-reported outcomes in CF, and there are many pitfalls when employing PROs in CF trials [6]. They are typically secondary endpoints and the trial is not powered on them, often making it difficult to draw valid inferences about treatments. However, there are trials that have collected patient-reported respiratory symptom data as the primary endpoint [78], employing the only CFQ-R subscale that has been approved by the FDA for use as an endpoint. Scientific, regulatory and pragmatic factors are driving the shift towards ePRO data collection. The development of ePROs is not trivial, yet they are fast becoming the ‘gold standard’ for PRO data capture in clinical trials. The challenge now is to develop CF-specific, lifespan PROs, utilising new technologies that can deliver real-time, high-quality PRO information. They also need to be acceptable to the regulatory bodies to aid their decisions on cost-effectiveness and ensure the appropriate commissioning of new medicines to improve the lives of people with CF and their families.

Original article with references here.

Newfound airway cells may breathe life into tackling cystic fibrosis

By Aimee Cunningham

Meet the ionocyte. This newly discovered cell may be the star of future cystic fibrosis therapies. Researchers have found that the gene tied to the disease is very active in the cells, which line the air passages of the lungs.

While the cells are rare, making up only 1 to 2 percent of cells that line the airways, they seem to play an outsized role in keeping lungs clear. The identification of the ionocyte “provides key information for targeting treatments,” says medical geneticist Garry Cutting of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, who was not involved in the research. Two teams, working independently, each describe the new cell online August 1 in Nature.

The ionocyte shares its name with similar cells found in fish gills and frog skin. This type of cell regulates fluid movement at surfaces — skin, gills, airways — where air and water meet. In people, special proteins that tunnel across cell membranes lining the airways allow chloride ions (half of what makes salt) to move into the airway. This causes water to move into the airway through a different channel to moisten mucus along the lining, which helps it remove bacteria and inhaled particles from the body.

The tunnel protein that allows chloride ions through is made by a gene called CFTR. In cystic fibrosis patients, that gene is flawed. Airways can’t regulate water movement properly and get clogged with thick mucus that traps bacteria and leads to persistent infections and lung damage. The genetic disease affects at least 70,000 people worldwide, according to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation in Bethesda, Md.

Researchers had suspected CFTR was most active in ciliated cells — cells with brushlike projections that work along with the mucus in airways to move invaders out. But the new work found very little gene activity in those cells, compared with the ionocytes.

In experiments with laboratory samples of mouse cells from the airway lining, cell biologist Jayaraj Rajagopal of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and his colleagues found that the gene was very active in ionocytes: out of all the instructions for building the tunnels detected in the cells, 54 percent came from ionocytes. Aron Jaffe, a respiratory disease researcher at Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., and his colleagues reported that, in laboratory samples of human airways cells, ionocytes were the source of 60 percent of the activity of the tunnels.

The discovery of the new cells raises a lot of questions. Jaffe wonders where ionocytes are positioned in the lining of the airways, and how that placement supports the coordination of water movement and mucus secretion by other cells. “You can imagine the distribution [of ionocytes] is really important,” he says.

A question Rajagopal has: “How does a rare cell type do all of this work?” In fish and frogs, ionocytes are loaded with mitochondria, the so-called cellular energy factories, he notes. Maybe that will be true for human ionocytes, too, giving them lots of energy to do the lion’s share of regulating the movement of water.

Both researchers say the ionocyte’s discovery should lead to a better understanding of cystic fibrosis. “It will let us think about creative new ways to approach the disease,” Rajagopal says.

Original article here.

AIT’s Inhaled Nitric Oxide Shows Potential in Fighting Bacterial Infection Prevalent in CF Patients

By Alice Melao

Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) was shown to be an effective antibacterial agent against Mycobacterium abscessus infection in preclinical studies, as well as in a pilot clinical trial, according to AIT Therapeutics.

The company discussed the latest data on its NO product in two poster presentations during the 3rd Annual World Bronchiectasis Conference held recently at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

NO is a small molecule that is an important mediator of immune defense mechanisms against infections. The compound has been shown to have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against several strains of bacteria that often infect patients with underlying lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF).

Continue reading AIT’s Inhaled Nitric Oxide Shows Potential in Fighting Bacterial Infection Prevalent in CF Patients

Phage-Coated Microparticles Treats Lung Conditions like CF

By SterlingAdmin

The methods available to treat bacterial infections are many. But among those with any real and lasting effectiveness, their usage is limited. Antibiotics were once the Holy Grail of medicine to deal with devastating diseases that wiped out entire populations. With them, these suffering conditions were almost entirely wiped out and the populace began to learn how to live without the fear of most children dying at a young age. But, as is well known, the age of antibiotic cure-alls is ending and the time of antibiotic resistance is beginning to reach its peak. So, medical researchers are hard at work on all the other opportunities for dealing with bacteria that don’t require these specific groups of compounds.

The Medicine of Viruses

Phage therapy is one such alternative that has begun to see more extensive use over the past two decades.Bacteriophages are lifeforms that have crafted over evolutionary time a niche focused on using bacteria as their reproductive hosts, killing said host in the process. And since they are living beings as well, they actively engage in the selective pressures of finding ways around resistance against them, rather than being a static attack on bacteria like antibiotics are. This means that even the most feared multi-drug resistant bacterial strains have little to no protection against phages.

The primary downside to this treatment is that phages are highly specialized, having formed themselves to only target a particular host species. Therefore, to deal with certain bacteria, one also has to find and be able to cultivate a certain type of phage. Once that step is accomplished, however, it has been found that they can be altered fairly easily to give them variable methods of attack, so as to minimize any potential side effects on the human body while they are killing the bacteria. They can even be set up to synergistically interact with the human immune system to work together to wipe out the bacterial invasion.

With the right phage strain, the largest remaining issue is how to get them into the human body and to the right type of location and system that the bacteria are also attacking from. A large proportion of phage research has gone into finding new ways to do this very thing, as it is one of the inefficient areas of the therapy and, if improved, can drastically heighten the success rates of the treatment and the types of bacterial diseases that can be combated.

It is difficult and time consuming to produce modified phage, with many of them dying in this fabrication. For bacterial diseases of the lungs, such as the kinds that like to colonize those suffering from cystic fibrosis, there is currently no true delivery method of getting phage into the deep lung tissues. And, of course, getting any single treatment approved requires showing success in some sort of animal model, even though the phages may not translate well or at all to anything other than humans. This is one of the major problems this author has with the current approval setup by governments for medical trials.

Microparticles For A Micro World

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have been seeking a new method for just such a delivery system. Dry powder formulations has seen some positive benefits for effectiveness in recent years, but there lingers the issue of how to use such a powder to delivery living phages to the right spot. To do so would require a very carefully made powder indeed.

The engineering techniques they brought into play were used to make phage-loaded microparticles (phage-MPs), hollow molecular structures formed using water-oil-water emulsion to keep them stable. The bacteria being combated was the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several strains of phage against it were chosen for the experiment.

The microparticles were housed in a phage-containing solution, allowing them to be filled with the phage after incubation. Though they were filled in a different way than the usual method of them being inside the MPs. Instead, they cover the exterior in this method after the MPs are made, meaning no phage are lost due to solvent usage during MP fabrication from the prior ways other studies used. Three to five phages were contained on the MPs in order to reduce the likelihood of any possible bacterial resistance.

This delivery mechanism also reduces endotoxin production by the phage, thereby minimizing side impacts of their use, with the reduction bringing them down to 0.078 endotoxin units (EUs), far below the accepted FDA limit of 20 EU in treatments. The technique was first tested on petri dishes containing the bacteria to which the phage-MPs were applied. The P. aeruginosa were modified to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to identify their living location on the plates.

A Complete Victory

After 16 hours of co-incubation, large patches of non-fluorescence showed where the phage had successfully killed off the bacteria, while the control group MPs without a phage coating had no deaths. These zones were also far larger than the applied MP area, showing that the phage were able to spread and extend to other bacteria in the dishes. The same test was done using synthetic sputum to mimic the environment of an animal lung and the bacteria and phages were applied at the same time. There was no visible growth of bacteria after application, showing that the phages were able to both control and wipe them out. A further test showed the phage are also able to get past the protective biofilms of the bacteria that they make under environmental emergencies.

The dry powder formulations were also seen to have a large burst of phages initially, with slow release for two weeks after, the perfect way to allow consistent application and treatment against the bacteria. The final experiment involved using mice infected with the bacteria. A control test using just phage-MPs showed no negative effects on the mice or their lungs after application. Fluorescent phage-MPs also showed that they were only localized to the lungs and nowhere else in the body, as desired. The control using free form phages without microparticles revealed how the dry powder still didn’t allow them to be properly applied, with no major phage levels detected in those mouse lungs, proving that the MPs as a transport vector were required.

When tested on mice infected with P. aeruginosa, the bacterial count dropped by an entire order of magnitude and 100% of the mice survived their pneumonia, while the untreated control group only had 13% survive. For mice with a cystic fibrosis genetic mutation, the same test saw their bacterial counts drop by three orders of magnitude, approaching the limit of what could be detected. The phage-MPs also saw the same effectiveness against multiple strains of the bacteria, meaning that even genetic variance in a population wasn’t enough to defend against them.

A last point of importance is that when testing against a mouse group exposed to phage-MPs long before being infected and later treated, there was no reduction in effect and no antibodies against the phages seemed to develop. So there is likely no performance loss to the treatment if used multiple times.

The New Antibiotics

As a conclusion, the researchers were able to engineer specialized biomaterials made of microparticles that, when coated with bacteriophages, were highly effective at reducing bacterial counts for lung-related diseases, including those resulting from the lowered immune system responses of cystic fibrosis. These phage-MPs are stable and can be stored for a fair amount of time with no loss in phage amounts and can be administered through simple inhalation, meaning younger patients can be treated with less complications.

For lung-related diseases, and likely for broader conditions at large in the medical community, this breakthrough might serve as a major way to allow phage therapy to become more common and used in replacement of or as a sought after alternative to antibiotics. The number of lives this should be able to save in the long run is likely incalculable.

Press Article Link

Study Link

Original article Link

Antioxidant-Enriched Multivitamin May Decrease Respiratory Illnesses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Scott D Sagel MD PhD
Professor of Pediatrics
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Aurora, Colorado

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Inflammation is an important feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease and contributes to lung damage and lung function decline in CF. We need safe and effective anti-inflammatory treatments in CF. Anti-oxidant therapy has been an area of promise, but with mixed results in CF.

This clinical trial, conducted at 15 CF centers affiliated with the cystic fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Development Network, enrolled 73 patients who were 10 years and older (average age 22 years), with pancreatic insufficiency, which causes malabsorption of antioxidants. Subjects were randomized to either a multivitamin containing multiple antioxidants including carotenoids such as beta(β)-carotene, tocopherols (vitamin E), coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and selenium or to a control multivitamin without antioxidant enrichment. The antioxidants used in the study were delivered in a capsule specifically designed for individuals with difficulties absorbing fats and proteins, including those with cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Antioxidant supplementation was safe and well-tolerated. Supplemental antioxidants increased antioxidant concentrations in the bloodstream in treated subjects and temporarily reduced inflammation in the blood at four weeks but not 16 weeks. Airway inflammation, as measured in sputum, did not change significantly with antioxidant treatment. Importantly, antioxidant treatment appeared to both prolong the time to the first respiratory illness requiring antibiotics and reduce the frequency of respiratory illnesses they experienced.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Taking a specially formulated antioxidant-enriched multivitamin, containing multiple dietary antioxidants, may decrease respiratory illnesses in people with cystic fibrosis. While more research needs to be done to find a treatment that delivers a sustained anti-inflammatory effect, we believe the prolonged time patients had before their first respiratory illness is clinically meaningful. Also, the cost of a dietary antioxidant-enriched multivitamin is relatively modest compared to other currently available therapies that have been proven to reduce pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We still don’t know the optimal dosing of these various dietary antioxidants. We also don’t know the added benefit of antioxidant supplementation in the era of CFTR modulator therapy, emerging treatments that get at the basic protein defect in cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: This clinical trial, funded by a grant from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, was an investigator-initiated study led by Scott D. Sagel, MD, PhD, a Professor of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Colorado and Director of the University of Colorado Cystic Fibrosis Center. It was not an industry initiated or funded trial. Callion Pharma manufactured the antioxidant-enriched and control multivitamins and provided them at no charge for this study.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:
Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial
Scott D Sagel , Umer Khan , Raksha Jain , Gavin Graff , Cori L Daines , Jordan M Dunitz , Drucy Borowitz , David M Orenstein , Ibrahim Abdulhamid , Julie Noe , John P Clancy , et al
https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201801-0105OC PubMed: 29688760
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

Published Online: April 24, 2018

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

Original interview article here. 

Harmful Bacteria Replace Beneficial Ones in Gut of CF Patients

By Vijaya Iyer

Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have a higher amount of harmful gut bacteria and increased levels of intestinal inflammation than healthy people, according to researchers.

Their study, “Altered intestinal microbiota composition, antibiotic therapy and intestinal inflammation in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis,” was published in the journal PLOS One.

CF predominantly affects the lungs, but it can also cause gastrointestinal complications. The CFTR protein defect (the cause of CF) is abundant in the gastrointestinal tract of patients and affects the normal structure of the intestine. This defect could influence the diversity of the bacteria present in the gut (also called the gut microbiome). Continue reading Harmful Bacteria Replace Beneficial Ones in Gut of CF Patients

Importance of Early Diagnosis, Treatment of NTM Infections

By Ashraf Malhas, PhD.

An earlier diagnosis and treatment of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) may positively affect the patient’s lung function, a study suggests.

NTM are a group of bacterial species, found in soil and water, which are not usually associated with human disease, except if they infect susceptible individuals, such as CF patients.

An increasing incidence of NTM infections in CF patients has been observed, with recent studies reporting a prevalence of 32.7%. The exact reasons behind this, the risk factors, the species involved, and effective treatments for NTM infections in CF patients remain largely unknown.

In the study “Clinical course and significance of nontuberculous mycobacteria and its subtypes in cystic fibrosis,” published in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, researchers analyzed the prevalence of NTM infections in CF patients to identify factors associated with these infections, as well as monitor current treatments.

The study initially involved 360 CF patients, of whom 30 (8%) were identified as being positive for NTM infection. Of these, 28 patients were further analyzed, and their results compared with 26 matched CF patients not infected with NTM (the control group).

Within the NTM group, 17 patients were infected with a class of NTM known as slow-growing, eight patients were infected with rapidly growing NTM, while three were positive for both types.

Those infected with slow-growing NTM were generally older (range of 6.4 to 41.6 years) than those infected with the rapid-growing types (3.1 to 21.5 years), but that difference did not reach statistical significance. However, the age at CF diagnosis was significantly lower in the slow-growing NTM group compared to the rapid-growing NTM group.

When lung function was assessed in the two groups, researchers found that lung function as measured by predicted expiratory flow was significantly higher before NTM infection, regardless of the type of NTM.

Regarding treatment patterns, the team found that significantly more patients infected with slow-growing NTM had received penicillin/beta-lactamase and rifampin following infection compared to before infection.

“An earlier CF diagnosis was associated with a higher isolation of slow-growing NTM and greater antimicrobial use after infection,” the researchers wrote, adding that “NTM acquisition is associated with a worsening of [lung function]. Thus, both the early diagnosis and treatment of an NTM infection in patients with CF may positively impact lung function.”

The team believes that “increased awareness by clinicians on different NTM subtypes and more universal treatment plan for NTM infection in the CF population may positively impact patient management and outcomes.”

Original article here.

Anaerobic bacteria cultured from CF airways correlate to milder disease-a multisite study

Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria were quantitated in respiratory samples across three cystic fibrosis (CF) centres using extended culture methods. Subjects, ages 1–69 years, who were clinically stable provided sputum (n=200) or bronchoalveolar lavage (n=55). Eighteen anaerobic and 39 aerobic genera were cultured from 59% and 95% of samples, respectively; 16/57 genera had a ≥5% prevalence across centres. Analyses of microbial communities using co-occurrence networks in sputum samples showed groupings of oral, including anaerobic, bacteria whereas typical CF pathogens formed distinct entities. Pseudomonas was associated with worse nutrition and F508del genotype, whereas anaerobe prevalence was positively associated with pancreatic sufficiency, better nutrition and better lung function. A higher ratio of total anaerobe/total aerobe colony forming units was associated with pancreatic sufficiency and better nutrition. Subjects grouped by factor analysis who had relative dominance of anaerobes over aerobes had milder disease compared to a Pseudomonas-dominated group with similar proportions of subjects being homozygous for F508del. In summary, anaerobic bacteria occurred at an early age. In sputum producing subjects anaerobic bacteria were associated with milder disease suggesting that targeted eradication of anaerobes may not be warranted in sputum producing CF subjects.

Full article here.

Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations

NovaBiotics Ltd (“NovaBiotics”) announces that its oral therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF), Lynovex®, has met the study objectives of the CARE CF 1 clinical trial.

CARE CF 1 assessed the effects of two weeks of Lynovex treatment as an adjunct to standard of care therapy (SOCT) in CF, compared to placebo plus SOCT. This trial was designed to determine whether the inclusion of Lynovex capsules alongside SOCT lessened the clinical impact of exacerbations in adults with CF, as measured by symptom severity and levels of bacteria and inflammatory mediators in sputum and blood.  CARE CF 1 was a 6-arm study with the primary objectives of determining the optimal dose and regimen of Lynovex in patients with exacerbations of CF-associated lung disease and to further evaluate the safety and tolerability of Lynovex in exacerbating CF patients.  Continue reading Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations