Freedom!

Guest post by: Kathy Russell

Today was a terrific day! We have just experienced a three-day series of high temperatures in the 80s. In the middle of summer that would be quite normal, but getting that kind of weather in April is extremely rare in my part of Oregon. I made the most of those days.

In our front yard, we have a very old and very large black walnut tree. There is a brick planter built around the base of the tree and there are various plants, including several sword ferns, growing in it. The sword ferns are beautiful if they are properly groomed. Each year, when the weather permits, I get out and cut away all of the old fronds to make room for new growth.

I didn’t get to do that last year because of my health. I just didn’t have the energy to do the bending and twisting that the task entails. Also, since I am on continuous oxygen, it makes getting out to the tree a bit problematic. Dragging my portable oxygen concentrator (POC) while I am pruning the ferns is a bit of a pain. I bend over and cut some old fronds, then I have to stand up and drag the POC to my next position. It makes it more of a chore and a lot less fun than it used to be before I was on oxygen.

Yesterday I worked on a couple of ferns that I could reach with the length of hose that is on my big concentrator. That was fairly workable, but I couldn’t go beyond the range of my hose. Also, I couldn’t reach two of the ferns. After about an hour I was getting too hot and decided to stop working on a large fern that was at the end of my tether.

Today, my husband took my large concentrator outside and plugged it into an outdoor outlet. With the 75 feet of hose that I have on it, I had a lot of freedom to move around. I was able to finish the fern that I left yesterday and finish the final two. I didn’t have to worry about running out of hose length and I felt so unencumbered. It was so great to be able to move around like a normal person. I absolutely loved that feeling of freedom. It was almost like not even being on oxygen.

My oxygen saturation stayed in a very good range and I got a couple of hours of fresh air. I was mostly in shade so I didn’t have to worry about being in the sun too long. Having the ability to move around and not have to drag a POC was a real gift as far as I am concerned.

CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 66: CIRCUIT TRAINING 1

For people with cystic fibrosis, getting “back” into shape is a common occurrence. Because of the nature of the disease, patients often experience set backs in both their health and fitness routines. But, exercise is an important and essential part of remaining compliant with treatments and medications in order to live a longer, healthier life with CF. Continue reading CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 66: CIRCUIT TRAINING 1

Newly Discovered CF Mutations Could Be Why Some People with CF are Living Longer

Researchers hypothesize that the newly-discovered mutations help re-hydrate the airways, discouraging bacterial build-up in the lungs.

Despite a narrow average lifespan, there is a big range in how severely cystic fibrosis (CF) affects the lungs and other organs depending on an individual’s specific genetic variation, and even in how long patients sharing the same, most common genetic mutation are able to survive with CF.

This led researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital to wonder if other genetic mutations could be protective against CF’s effects. Recent findings published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology suggest that may be the case.

“There are some patients at one end of extreme severity who need a lung transplant very early in life, then others whose clinical presentation seems to stabilize so that they can live into the fifth and sixth decades of life,” says Pankaj Agrawal, MBBS, MMSc, principal investigator and medical director of The Manton Center’s Gene Discovery Core at Boston Children’s, who was the co-first author on the study.

To find out why, Agrawal and researchers at Boston Children’s — including Ruobing Wang, MD, a pulmonologist, and Craig Gerard, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Respiratory Diseases — conducted the first-ever longitudinal analysis of genetic modifiers related to CF.

They combed through a population of nearly 600 CF patients registered at the Boston Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center and found five individuals who stood out because of their advanced age — in their 50s or 60s — and relatively normal lung function.

“Given the large size of our center’s patient population, we were able to find a number of individuals at this rare ‘extreme,'” says Wang, who was co-first author on the paper.

A new hypothesis for mitigating cystic fibrosis

To discover the genetic variants, the researchers collected blood from these patients and performed whole exome sequencing on their DNA, analyzing the “coding” section of the genome that is responsible for most disease-related mutations.

Sequencing the genes of these five Boston Children’s patients — a cohort known as “long-term non-progressors” — the researchers found a set of rare and never-before-discovered genetic variants that might help explain their longevity and stable lung function.

The gene variants are related to so-called epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs), semi-permeable cellular pathways responsible for reabsorbing sodium in the kidney, colon, lung and sweat glands.

“Our hypothesis is that these ENaC mutations help to rehydrate the airways of CF patients, making it less likely for detrimental bacteria to take up residence in the lungs,” says Wang.

The discovery brings ENaCs into the limelight as a potential new therapeutic target.

“For example, if we could target ENaCs with a small molecule or an antibody-based drug, we might be able to incur a protective effect against CF’s progression,” says Agrawal, who is also a physician in the Boston Children’s Division of Newborn Medicine.

Based on their findings, the team is now doing further studies to analyze the genetics of patients at the other end of the CF spectrum — those with extremely severe clinical presentation of symptoms at a young age.

Story Source:

Boston Children’s Hospital. “Some people with cystic fibrosis might live longer because of genetic mutations: Researchers hypothesize that the newly-discovered mutations help re-hydrate the airways, discouraging bacterial build-up in the lungs.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 October 2017. <https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171025150620.htm>.

Materials provided by Boston Children’s HospitalNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

We Can, Right? – Guest blog from USACFA Fall 2017 Scholarship Winner

By: Jacob Greene

Cystic Fibrosis is an awkward disease. Whether it’s coughing attacks in the middle of tests, the infamous CF digestive issues (for professionalism’s sake I will leave it at that, but you know what I mean), or loud treatments in the morning and at night, there are many awkward aspects to cystic fibrosis. CF’s median life expectancy is no different. Continue reading We Can, Right? – Guest blog from USACFA Fall 2017 Scholarship Winner

You are invited to attend a free web-cast event SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 2017

RARE LUNG DISEASES PATIENT EDUCATION DAY ON CYSTIC FIBROSIS, CHILDREN’S INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE AND PRIMARY CILIARY DYSKINESIA

REGISTER NOW AT:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6993341835513746691

This event is co-sponsored by the American Thoracic Society, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, the Children’s Interstitial Lung Disease Foundation and the Primary Continue reading You are invited to attend a free web-cast event SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 2017

OWN IT: Cystic Fibrosis Survival Rates in the United States vs. Canada

A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine concluded that “the median age of survival [is] 10 years higher [for CF patients] in Canada than the United States.”

If you’re wrapped up in the world of cystic fibrosis news like I am then you’ve probably seen this study floating around the Internet for the Continue reading OWN IT: Cystic Fibrosis Survival Rates in the United States vs. Canada

‘Stunning’ gap: Canadians with cystic fibrosis outlive Americans by a decade

‘Stunning’ gap: Canadians with cystic fibrosis outlive Americans by a decade

Continue reading ‘Stunning’ gap: Canadians with cystic fibrosis outlive Americans by a decade

Making it Matter Ep. 25 – Salty Cysters

Lea Faraone, from the Salty Cysters, joins the podcast today to talk about her life with cystic fibrosis. At 26, she works as an oncology nurse, and is an advocate for people with cystic fibrosis. She uses the @SaltyCysters social media platform to spread educational awareness Continue reading Making it Matter Ep. 25 – Salty Cysters

Making it Matter Ep. 24 – Dealing with Disease Progression

Julia and I take a question from my most recent Facebook Live on the Boomer Esiason Foundation page, which asks about the progression of cystic fibrosis and how we deal with it.

Since cystic fibrosis is a progressive disease, it can take an emotional Continue reading Making it Matter Ep. 24 – Dealing with Disease Progression

Making it Matter Ep. 18

Making it Matter Ep. 18 – Cystic Fibrosis and Long Term Relationships

Julia and I answer an email from a listener who asks about long term relationships, marriage and kids. Admittedly, neither Julia nor I are even close to that point in our lives, but we do discuss some of the things that are Continue reading Making it Matter Ep. 18