You have a new set of lungs! What should you expect next?

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 183:
The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis
By Jerry Cahill
In the latest edition of The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center is back to explain what happens after a patient has a double lung transplant. He discusses pain management and the post-transplant care team in detail.
Here’s what to expect immediately pre and post-surgery:
  • Post-surgical care including pain management
  • Medical care that includes antibiotics, antirejection medication, and anti-infection medication
  • Psycho-social recovery assistance
Dr. Arcasoy also explains who your post-transplant care team is and what they do… it’s a lot, so here’s a cheat sheet:
WHO: Medical Transplant Pulmonologist and the Coordinator
WHAT:
Patients will meet with their Post-transplant team once a week for three months, then every 3-4 weeks for a year. At every meeting, the following occurs:
  • Chest x-ray
  • Lab work
  • Pulmonary function test
  • Physical exam
  • Conversation to review medications and overall health & wellness
  • Follow up lab review and medication changes
The schedule for bronchoscopies vary depending on the center, and additional testing can be added at any time deemed necessary.
Remember – every patient’s experience is completely unique! Do not get discouraged; and work with your care team to prepare both mentally and physically for the bumps along the way.

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medical Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

You got the call for transplant… Now what happens?

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 182:
The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis
In Jerry Cahill’s latest edition of The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. D’Ovidio and Dr. Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center explain what happens once a patient receives the official phone call for his or her transplant.
They explain dry runs, the transplant surgery, a patient’s first breath, and more! Keep in mind; the overall transplant experience varies greatly among patients, as each case is completely unique.
This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medical Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

SIX Ways to PAY IT FORWARD to CF ROUNDTABLE!

By Jeanie Hanley, President

Greetings CF Roundtable Subscriber!

May is CF Awareness month. What better way to “Pay It Forward” than by supporting CF Roundtable which has been vital to the CF community! Please consider making a tax-deductible donation today.

This is YOUR CF Roundtable and because of your generosity, YOU have made it possible for nearly 30 years. 100% of your donation goes into the newsletter and many outreach programs. All work is done by volunteers with CF like Andrea, our Executive Editor, whose inspirational words regarding her 18 years of transplant are below:

Eighteen Years of Life Post-Transplant

By Andrea Eisenman, Executive Editor of CF Roundtable

Reflecting back on my life for the last 18 years post-transplant, I am amazed I have lived so long. Way longer than I expected, considering the 50 percent median survival of 5 years after a bilateral lung transplant. I am grateful for this time in which I was able to get married, go back to school for various interests like film and cooking, and care for my mom in her later years, share my life with people I care about and never in recent memory felt this good.

While I have enjoyed a good quality of life, it came with a price of total compliance almost to the point of being neurotic at times (my doctors probably get sick of my calls and emails), a daily exercise regimen and lots of rest. But I found that if I did things I enjoyed like tennis, pickle ball or swimming, it helped get the exercise for that day done while it was fun and social.

I have been extremely fortunate as not only do I have this longevity with transplant and I feel pretty well. Aside from the last 12 months, I have had the ability to travel and do most things my peers do. While I had some setbacks recently, I am starting to feel better. I keep a positive outlook and do what is needed. I can see how precious this gift of life is and I hope that when my time comes to be a donor, the person who gets my organs enjoys them as much as I enjoyed these lungs.

DONATE LIFE!

Please consider Paying It Forward in these six ways:

 

  • Unrestricted Gifts – your contribution will go to the program that needs it most.
  • Milestone Celebration: for a transplant anniversary, birth of a child, wedding, or a birthday. There is no greater reward than celebrating YOU and YOUR accomplishments.
  • Tribute Gifts – donate in honor or in memory of someone.  
  • USACFA Endowment Fund – consider contributing which will get CF Roundtable closer to be self-sustaining forever! Please contact us if you are able to contribute.
  • Matching Gifts – if your employer has this program, then let us know!
  • Bequest – A simple and easy way to remember CF Roundtable in your estate planning.  To establish a bequest, please contact us.

 

To make a donation, click here DONATE NOW!

Or MAIL a check USACFA

(made out to USACFA) to:

PO Box 1618

Gresham, OR 97030

Contact us at cfroundtable@usacfa.org for any further assistance.

USACFA proudly publishes CF Roundtable and all its associated programs; USACFA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. All donations are tax-deductible.

Thank you!

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 180: The Pre-Transplant Process

In Jerry Cahill’s latest podcast series, The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, we hear from Dr. Selim Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center. He discusses the pre-transplant process by covering the following topics:
  • When should a CF patient consider a lung transplant?
    • When lung function decreases to 30% or below
    • When there is an increased infection resistance
    • When exacerbations resulting in ICU hospital stays become frequent
    • When a patient experiences frequent lung bleeds and collapse
  • What is the transplant listing process?
  • What is the transplant evaluation process?
  • What are some testing and evaluation obstacles, both mental and psychosocial?
  • What is dual listing?
  • What happens when you are actively listed?

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medial Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

Stream “Up for Air” Documentary this Month for Free!

Jerry Cahill‘s documentary, “Up for Air”, provides viewers with an inside look at his personal fight for survival while living with #CF. During national #DonateLifeMonth (4/1 – 4/30) use the code: BEANORGANDONOR to watch the documentary for FREE! Tap the link to watch: https://vimeo.com/137872395

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Jerry Unplugged: Bouncin’ Back

Well, here I sit, staring at four walls, unable to ride my bike, work out, coach, or run. I’m stuck here in my apartment for the next two weeks as I recover from a partial knee replacement. This lifestyle is not me at all. I’m frustrated, and it would be easy to get discouraged, but I can’t afford to.
I’ve just listed some of the many things I can’t do, but I’m focusing on what I can and must do in order to live the way I want to live. I must stay focused on the positive and on my recovery. It’s the only way to bounce back to my version of normal.

Continue reading Jerry Unplugged: Bouncin’ Back

Thanks to The Boomer Esiason Foundation, CF Roundtable’s new Pearl Sustaining Partner

We would like to thank The Boomer Esiason Foundation for its continued support at the Pearl Sustaining Partner level. A special thank you goes out to BEF volunteer Jerry Cahill for helping make this grant possible. Because of this support, we can provide all of our CF Roundtable programs such as:

The Boomer Esiason Foundation helps support the CF community via its programs including:

  • Scholarships – BEF has numerous scholarship opportunities available
  • Lung Transplant Grant Program – covers transportation, housing and other expenses not covered by insurance that are related to transplant
  • You Cannot Fail – A motivation program that empowers people with CF
  • CF Podcasts – podcasts covering a wide variety of CF-related topics produced by Jerry Cahill
  • CF Wind Sprints – short videos by BEF Volunteer Jerry Cahill with tips for living with CF
  • Gunnar’s Blog – a personal blog of Gunnar Esiason, Boomer’s son, who has CF
  • Hospital Bags – goodie bags provided to CF patients of all ages during hospital stays
  • Team Boomer – encourages people with CF to be active by participating in events and helping to fundraise
  • Bike 2 Breathe – An annual 500-bike tour to raise awareness for the importance of exercise with CF
  • CF Century Rides – A personal goal of Jerry Cahill’s. Jerry is determined to do a century ride (100 miles bike ride) in all 50 states for CF!
  • CF: Live By Example – A pilot program where people with CF who are living, breathing, and succeeding will ensure parents of newly diagnosed children that CF is only a bump in the road, not a death sentence.
  • Club CF – an online forum where people with CF can share their stories

For more information on The Boomer Esiason Foundation please visit: https://www.esiason.org/

Bustle for muscle

by Brennen Reeves

A mom who played college basketball. A dad who entered the army at eighteen. A brother who received a football scholarship after high school. That’s my family.
Me, I like theatre and acting.

I like to workout. I can do most anything, though I tire when I run. Running, not a daunting task for anyone else in my family- nor was the ability to put on weight or the ability to gain muscles. Both were and still remain a struggle of mine today. I understand the weight section- I have CF, my heart beats faster than other hearts, my digestive tract is not on track and diabetes is well, diabetes. Sadly, I cannot understand why I cannot gain muscle. Or turn the muscle that now exists to a lean quality.
I exercise just as much as the next person.

My parents and brother, they’re athletes. Sure, being athletic doesn’t necessarily mean you possess muscle, but my family did. I retained some of those genes. I played baseball, I owned a lacrosse stick, I love to golf. I count that as a sport (so what if I ride in the cart?).
I have coordination.

I received a bilateral lung transplant over 7 years ago. Within that gap, and day by day I become more flexible, stronger, newly energized, with no luck of further muscle growth. The weight is there. Up about thirty-five pounds. But how come there is no significant muscle gain, or the leanness to which I work for? Could it be a diet issue? Because the thirty, sixty, ninety day routine after these 7 years has been ineffective. I still come up short and this lets me down, my physical appearance.

I’m 5’6” and weigh around 120lbs. My body is symmetrically balanced. I have new lungs. There’s the determination- so why this outcome or lack of?
This is not a lecturer post but more a collaborative question- what is your secret? Do you have a secret? Is it a secret?

Sure, I still have CF, yes, my heart still beats faster than other hearts, yes, my digestive tract needs aligning, and well, diabetes still remains diabetes. Just about every other facet since my surgery has changed, emotionally, physically, etc., and my body is still present just with a little more weight with nowhere to go.

I challenge this. Could it be the severed nerves under my breast plate have yet to heal or reconnect, making it harder to attract muscle in this area? The numbness from my shoulders on down through the wrists lose feelings during most points of the day, is that a sign indicating powerless limbs?

“7years. Brennen your body needs more time to heal”
Ok.
—–
Wait,
or could it just be my body?

Check out Jerry Cahill’s new blog: Jerry Unplugged!

Jerry recently launched Jerry Unplugged, a new blog segment on his website where he will share insights, experiences, and more!

Who Am I?

I’m Delta F508. I’m R117H. I’m a cystic fibrosis patient. I’m post double-lung transplant by 5 years and 10 months.
I am all that and so much more. I am Jerry Cahill: athlete, coach, and friend. I have an unrivaled joie de vivre. I am positive, relentless, kind and generous. I am a man, who just happens to have cystic fibrosis. I don’t accept mediocrity. I never give up and always believe You Cannot Fail.
I was born one of six kids and, although I had CF, my parents treated me just like the others. After I was diagnosed, my mother wanted to shelter me, but my dad said, “If his life is going to be shorter, I want him to spend it with his brothers, having fun and being normal.” My dad believed that “you cannot fail as long as you try,” and I made it my life’s mantra.
I attended college and went to nationals in pole vaulting. It isn’t that I didn’t have issues because of CF, it’s just that I chose not to let them get in the way and be roadblocks. They were just detours on the way to my dreams. I went on to have a successful career while juggling the demands of CF. I never have and never will let the disease define me. The more it progressed, the more I pushed back.
Finally, nearly six years ago, at age 56, I needed a lung transplant and received one thanks to the unconditional love and generosity of a grieving family. I am grateful to my donor every day.  Continue reading…

Why I Do What I Do?

Because I can…
I believe in giving back & passing it on. I’ve been given a platform, so I use it to share what I’ve learned and experienced to benefit others. I really like the quote from the movie, The History Boys: “Pass the parcel. That’s sometimes all you can do. Take it, feel it, and pass it on. Not for me, not for you, but for someone, somewhere, one day.” I don’t do all this for myself; I do it to give hope to others, to inspire them to do more, fight harder, and be the best they can be. Everyone has limitations, but I want to inspire every person to go out and be the “hero of your own story.” Continue reading…

Doctor, Doctor!

I walked into the office the other day while Boomer was there and we began to make small talk. He asked how I was doing and I told him I had to see the doctor for my knee, because I’m having knee-replacement surgery in March. Boomer started to laugh and asked, “Just how many doctors do you have? You’re always seeing some doctor, and you act like it’s no big deal. You know, not everybody sees as many doctors as you do.”
“Boomer, I have CF! I’ve had a transplant. I have doctors but not that many, really,” I replied. Continue reading…

6 ways to get back into shape after a CF-setback

For people with cystic fibrosis, getting “back” into shape is a common occurrence. Because of the nature of the disease, patients often experience setbacks in both their health and fitness routines. But, exercise is an important and essential part of remaining compliant with treatments and medications in order to live a longer, healthier life with CF.

Continue reading 6 ways to get back into shape after a CF-setback