Livestreaming of the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC)

North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference
Opportunity: Register Now for the Livestream Content
Dates: NACFC will be held October 18-20
The North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) brings together researchers and health care professionals from around the world to discuss the latest in cystic fibrosis research, care, infection, treatment, and drug development.
You can explore conference sessions along with the experts! Join us online for three livestreamed plenaries, follow-up Facebook Live Q&As with the speakers, and additional livestreamed workshops and symposia that were hand-selected by members of the CF community, including members of Community Voice. You will find the schedule for these sessions below. The plenary sessions are the major keynote sessions that are presented to all attendees. Each plenary will be followed by a Facebook live Q&A session with the plenary presenters.
During the third plenary session, keep an eye out for Community Voice Melanie Abdelnour, who will be sharing about the importance of partnering with her care team.
Additionally, you will have access to view the content from all other sessions where speakers have consented to share their presentations through the sync-to-slide feature 6 weeks after the conference. Stay tuned for more details!
Register now to livestream the plenaries, workshops, and symposia.
Thursday, October 18, 2018
  • Advancing Basic Science Toward a ‘One-Time’ CF Cure – 09:45 am – 11:05 am MT
  • Pro/Con: Current Debate in Pulmonary Treatments – 09:45 am – 11:05 am MT
  • Controversial Practices – Helpful or Harmful – 02:00 pm – 03:25 pm MT
  • Healthy Habits: Promoting Physical & Mental Health Through Sleep, Exercise, & Nutrition – 02:00 pm – 03:25 pm MT
  • Plenary 1: Improving Outcomes of Infections in the Age of CFTR Modulators – 04:30 pm – 06:00 pm MT (6:30-8 ET)
  • Facebook Live: Infection Research: Mission Possible,  6:30 pm MT (8:30 pm ET) 
Friday, October 19, 2018 
  • Plenary 2: Anti-inflammatories & Mucociliary Clearance Therapies in the Age of CFTR Modulators – 9:00 – 10:00 am MT (11:00 – 12:00 pm ET)
  • Facebook Live: Glad You Brought It Up: Mucus and Inflammation, 12:15 pm MT (2:15 pm ET)
  • The Changing Face of Pulmonary Exacerbation Treatment – 10:30 am – 11:55 am MT
  • Progress & Promise of the CFTR Modulator Pipeline – 10:30 am – 11:55 am MT
  • Novel Approaches to Modulate CFTR – 02:00 pm – 03:20 pm MT
  • Nutrition Research – 02:00 pm – 03:20 pm MT
Saturday, October 20, 2018 
  • Plenary 3: Partnering: The Oldest New Idea to Improve CF Care – 9:00 – 10:00 am MT (11:00 – 12:00 pm ET) 
  • Facebook Live: Howdy, Partner! A Live Q&A, 12:15 pm MT (2:15 pm ET)
  • CF Airway Inflammation – 10:30 am – 11:50 am MT
  • Progress in CF Pulmonary Disease – 10:30 am – 11:50 am MT
  • Pain Management in CF – 02:30 pm – 03:55 pm MT
  • ‘Adulting’ With CF – 02:30 pm – 03:55 pm MT
If you have any questions, please email communityvoice@cff.org.
Best,
The Community Voice Team

I’m Drowning – A researcher-patient’s plea for broader inclusion in cystic fibrosis trials

By: Ella Balasa

I’ve always known cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive disease; it destroys lung cells, tightens the small airways in the bottom of my chest, and each day takes me closer to the time when it will have ravaged my lungs. I had never really questioned if there was some way this process could be altered. I accepted that it couldn’t.

Recently, however, this has changed. The epicenter of new CF research is the development of medications that will slow, stop, and hopefully even reverse the effects and damage that CF inflicts on the body. The possibility of the cells in my lungs functioning to their full potential — with CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein function restored and working correctly, expelling chloride out of my cells, hydrating the surface of my lungs, and halting the thick sticky mucus that has caused my airways to be enveloped in a suffocating cloak for all these years — is like a feeling of being rescued when you are drowning.

Unfortunately, I am still drowning.

“I’m very sorry, Ms. Balasa, but you will not be able to be a participant in this clinical trial.” This was the response I received during one of my searches for these drug trials. Excited by the possibility of participating, finding one recruiting at my local adult clinic, I reached out to study coordinators and was informed that I met all but one criterion to participate in the studies. This specific criterion has prevented me from prior trial participation involving other investigational medications treating the symptoms of CF, including anti-infectives and anti-inflammatories.

Most CF studies, including phase I, II, and III trials, require a lung function minimum of at least 40% FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second). My FEV1 is 25%, so I am excluded from these trials. Many patients face a similar situation. The 40% threshold biases samples toward a young patient population, as this degenerative condition causes steadily decreasing lung function with time. Furthermore, as CF treatment has rapidly progressed and increased patients’ life expectancies, there are now more adults with CF in the U.S. than children, according to the CF Foundation Patient Registry.

As a patient who works in the science field, I started to ask myself: Where does that number come from? Should this one variable be such a deciding factor? Are we getting comprehensive results from these studies if a subset of patients is omitted? Are investigators using eligibility criteria from a prior study without determining whether the exclusions are scientifically justifiable?

To continue reading, please visit MedPage Today.

Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

By Michele Wilson PhD

The buildup of mucus in the lungs is an ongoing challenge faced by people with cystic fibrosis, and knowing whether they should seek medical attention is not always clear.

Recently, Mologic – a developer of personalized diagnostics – have developed a tool which they hope will help guide people with cystic fibrosis so they can avoid unnecessary stays in hospital.

The app-embedded algorithm converts data collected from a urinary test to a traffic light result, which indicates whether a patient is stable or in need of medical intervention.

Recently, Mologic, announced that they are launching a clinical trial to assess the company’s urine-based diagnostic tool, ‘HeadsUp’.

To learn more about how this point-of-care diagnostic tool could help improve healthcare for people with cystic fibrosis, we spoke with Gita Parekh, Head of R&D at Mologic.

How do you define pulmonary exacerbation, and why is it important that it is monitored in people with cystic fibrosis? Continue reading Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

Antioxidant-Enriched Multivitamin May Decrease Respiratory Illnesses

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:

Scott D Sagel MD PhD
Professor of Pediatrics
University of Colorado School of Medicine
Aurora, Colorado

MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study?

Response: Inflammation is an important feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease and contributes to lung damage and lung function decline in CF. We need safe and effective anti-inflammatory treatments in CF. Anti-oxidant therapy has been an area of promise, but with mixed results in CF.

This clinical trial, conducted at 15 CF centers affiliated with the cystic fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Development Network, enrolled 73 patients who were 10 years and older (average age 22 years), with pancreatic insufficiency, which causes malabsorption of antioxidants. Subjects were randomized to either a multivitamin containing multiple antioxidants including carotenoids such as beta(β)-carotene, tocopherols (vitamin E), coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and selenium or to a control multivitamin without antioxidant enrichment. The antioxidants used in the study were delivered in a capsule specifically designed for individuals with difficulties absorbing fats and proteins, including those with cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What are the main findings?

Response: Antioxidant supplementation was safe and well-tolerated. Supplemental antioxidants increased antioxidant concentrations in the bloodstream in treated subjects and temporarily reduced inflammation in the blood at four weeks but not 16 weeks. Airway inflammation, as measured in sputum, did not change significantly with antioxidant treatment. Importantly, antioxidant treatment appeared to both prolong the time to the first respiratory illness requiring antibiotics and reduce the frequency of respiratory illnesses they experienced.

MedicalResearch.com: What should readers take away from your report?

Response: Taking a specially formulated antioxidant-enriched multivitamin, containing multiple dietary antioxidants, may decrease respiratory illnesses in people with cystic fibrosis. While more research needs to be done to find a treatment that delivers a sustained anti-inflammatory effect, we believe the prolonged time patients had before their first respiratory illness is clinically meaningful. Also, the cost of a dietary antioxidant-enriched multivitamin is relatively modest compared to other currently available therapies that have been proven to reduce pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: What recommendations do you have for future research as a result of this study?

Response: We still don’t know the optimal dosing of these various dietary antioxidants. We also don’t know the added benefit of antioxidant supplementation in the era of CFTR modulator therapy, emerging treatments that get at the basic protein defect in cystic fibrosis.

MedicalResearch.com: Is there anything else you would like to add?

Response: This clinical trial, funded by a grant from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, was an investigator-initiated study led by Scott D. Sagel, MD, PhD, a Professor of Pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Colorado and Director of the University of Colorado Cystic Fibrosis Center. It was not an industry initiated or funded trial. Callion Pharma manufactured the antioxidant-enriched and control multivitamins and provided them at no charge for this study.

MedicalResearch.com: Thank you for your contribution to the MedicalResearch.com community.

Citation:
Effects of an Antioxidant-enriched Multivitamin in Cystic Fibrosis: Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter Trial
Scott D Sagel , Umer Khan , Raksha Jain , Gavin Graff , Cori L Daines , Jordan M Dunitz , Drucy Borowitz , David M Orenstein , Ibrahim Abdulhamid , Julie Noe , John P Clancy , et al
https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201801-0105OC PubMed: 29688760
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

Published Online: April 24, 2018

Note: Content is Not intended as medical advice. Please consult your health care provider regarding your specific medical condition and questions.

Original interview article here. 

Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations

NovaBiotics Ltd (“NovaBiotics”) announces that its oral therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF), Lynovex®, has met the study objectives of the CARE CF 1 clinical trial.

CARE CF 1 assessed the effects of two weeks of Lynovex treatment as an adjunct to standard of care therapy (SOCT) in CF, compared to placebo plus SOCT. This trial was designed to determine whether the inclusion of Lynovex capsules alongside SOCT lessened the clinical impact of exacerbations in adults with CF, as measured by symptom severity and levels of bacteria and inflammatory mediators in sputum and blood.  CARE CF 1 was a 6-arm study with the primary objectives of determining the optimal dose and regimen of Lynovex in patients with exacerbations of CF-associated lung disease and to further evaluate the safety and tolerability of Lynovex in exacerbating CF patients.  Continue reading Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations

Omega-3 Compound Reduces Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in New Pilot Study

By Jennifer Prince

A marine omega-3 compound comprising a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) sn1-monoacylglyceride (MAG-DHA) may act as an anti-inflammatory for subjects with cystic fibrosis, according to a new pilot study1 published in the journal Marine Drugs. In the study, MaxSimil (Neptune Wellness Solutions; Laval, QC, Canada) increased omega-3 red blood cell levels, helped moderate the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) to docosahexaenoic acid, and reduced key inflammatory biomarkers in subjects with cystic fibrosis. Continue reading Omega-3 Compound Reduces Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in New Pilot Study

I’m on the transplant list, now what?

In Jerry Cahill’s latest edition of The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. Selim Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center discusses what happens once a patient is on the transplant list.
The first three major steps are:
  1. Create a strict exercise program with the hospital rehab center and integrate it into the patient’s schedule.
  2. Meet with a nutritionist in order to maintain proper weight.
  3. Educate! Meet with the care team in order to understand the entire process – both pre and post transplant.
The transplant process is a long one – and thoroughly detailed – in order to increase the chances of success. Tune in to learn more from Dr. Arcasoy.

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medial Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

A Breath of Fresh Air for Biotechs Working on Cystic Fibrosis Therapies

Researchers from the University of Zurich have determined the structure of a chloride channel, which could be a target for new drugs to treat cystic fibrosis.

Researchers at the University of Zurich have found a new target for future cystic fibrosis treatments. The study, published in Nature, has uncovered the structure of a protein that could help to correct the mechanism underlying the buildup of sticky mucus in patients’ lungs. This could give rise to a new wave of therapeutics for the condition, which at the moment lacks disease-modifying treatments.

Cystic fibrosis is a severe genetic disease affecting the lungs, for which there is currently no cure. It is caused by a malfunctioning chloride channel, CFTR, which prevents the secretion of chloride by cells, leading to the production of thick, sticky mucus in the lung. The condition affects around 70,000 people worldwide, who suffer from chronic infections and require daily physiotherapy.

However, one potential approach to treat cystic fibrosis is to activate the calcium-activated chloride channel, TMEM16A, as an alternative route for chloride efflux. As TMEM16A is located within the same epithelium as CFTR, its activation could rehydrate the mucus layer. The research group used cryo-electron microscopy to decipher the structure of TMEM16A, which is part of a protein family that facilitates the flow of negatively charged ions or lipids across the cell membrane.

The changes that occur in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

TMEM16A is found in many of our organs, playing a key role in muscle contraction and pain perception, as well as in the lungs. It forms an hourglass-shaped protein-enclosed channel, which when bound by positively charged calcium ions, opens to let chloride ions to pass through the membrane.

Current treatments for cystic fibrosis include bronchodilators, mucus thinners, antibiotics, and physiotherapy, which only control symptoms. However, biotechs around Europe are beginning to make progress, with ProQR completing a Phase Ib trial and Galapagos and Abbvie’s triple combination therapy entering Phase I. Antabio has also received €7.6M from CARB-X to develop a new antibiotic against Pseudomonas infections.

The identification of a new target provides patients and biotechs alike with renewed hope of new and effective cystic fibrosis treatments, or even a cure. It will be interesting to see whether small molecules or gene therapy specialists could take advantage of this information.

Original article: https://labiotech.eu/cystic-fibrosis-treatment-target/

Home Spirometers: A Useful Tool in Tracking CF Symptoms and Progress

Guest Blog By: Meranda Honaker

Over the last several months my health has continued to decline despite being compliant and diligent with my healthcare routine. In July I developed a fever during a trip to Boston to speak to a biotech company about my journey with cystic fibrosis. I developed a fever and by the end of my visit, I was unable to walk up steps without severe dyspnea. I was so exhausted from feeling sick I would return to my hotel room to lay in the bed for hours to rest. My chest pain and shortness of breath became so severe in the coming days that I could no longer take a deep breath. I checked my SpiroPd home spirometer which displayed a definite decline in my lung function. I immediately contacted my CF clinic to see my CF doctor. Initially, despite feeling bad, I assumed I was feeling poorly and decided not to rush to CF clinic. Sometimes I have a bad day or few bad days health wise and begin to improve on my own. Once I saw my lung function had declined I knew I needed to be seen in CF clinic rather than waiting it out.
Continue reading Home Spirometers: A Useful Tool in Tracking CF Symptoms and Progress

Phase 1a study for drug to treat CF regardless of CF Mutation

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171018005403/en/Synspira-Announces-Patient-Dosed-Phase-1a-Study

Synspira Announces First Patient Dosed in Phase 1a Study of SNSP113 in Cystic Fibrosis
— First-in-class drug candidate for treatment of cystic fibrosis regardless of genetic mutation — Continue reading Phase 1a study for drug to treat CF regardless of CF Mutation