26 Years and Counting with CF

By Ella Balasa

The day I was born, the median life expectancy of someone living with cystic fibrosis was 31. Although I haven’t reached that median yet, I feel like I’ve beaten the odds.

During past birthdays, my parents, brother, and I celebrated with cakes filled with raspberry layers and chocolate frosting. The cake always had my name written across the top in big, pink, block letters, and the number of candles matched the number of years lived. I remember my dad’s voice quivering just slightly by the time he sang the last “Happy Birthday” lyric. I think that he sheds an extra tear of joy, metaphorically, for each year I get older. He’s happier than the year before, that I’m one year closer to living the long life he hopes and prays his little girl would have.

I know my parents have always had a seed of heartache that they’ve kept hidden far in the back of their thoughts, watered by the knowledge that they may outlive their youngest daughter. It’s a feeling unknown to me; I can only imagine the fear.

I realize that my disease continues to progress with each passing year, causing a gradual decline in the intensity of accomplishable physical activities. My birthday is somewhat of a grim reminder of what I’ve lost over time. It’s marked by at least one less thing I can do.

Toward the end of my high school years, my brother was my exercise coach. He was always encouraging (sometimes nagging) me to do frog hops down the driveway and sprints from the mailbox to the stop sign on the corner. I also was running about 1 mile, or half of one, in my neighborhood on the days I felt extra motivated. One early summer day, at the end of my loop, about half a block before I reached the stop sign on my corner, I felt the urge to cough. When I got to the corner, I started coughing globs of pure blood while bracing myself against the sign. It was one of the last times I ran. That was the year I turned 18.

When I turned 21, I stopped working out at a gym and instead got a treadmill and weights at home because I had started to require supplemental oxygen while exercising. Without the extra oxygen, my blood oxygenation levels would dip into a range that could cause damage to my heart. My lungs began failing at the job they are required to do: supply oxygen from the air into my blood vessels and to the rest of my organs.

I was using a nasal cannula and carrying around a machine that puffed loudly with every breath, but I couldn’t allow people to see me as abnormal. I still have a hard time being in public with the supplemental oxygen, and although I don’t yet require using it constantly, it’s caused my illness to become visible rather than invisible, as it typically was — and I struggle with that.

Last year, when I was 25, I learned what it feels like to do a 500-pound deadlift. Except I wasn’t in a competition. I was bringing just two bags of groceries into my house from my car less than 50 feet away. During infection exacerbations in my lungs, I am unable to walk at a normal pace, much less carry anything, due to my airways feeling like they are the diameter of a toothpick, and the lack of oxygen my body is receiving. During these times, I feel my body needing the extra oxygen that I sometimes deprive it of because of my unwillingness to show the signs of my disease.

Based on this column thus far, it might seem as though I lament on the difficulties. Honestly, I don’t notice much when my breathing becomes less limited. It’s easier to notice when my breath is restricted and I feel my body producing less, functioning less.

Despite these reflections on my inabilities, I don’t remember my birthdays for all the things I couldn’t do in that year. I do remember everything I could and did do, both on that day and the 364 days in between. For my 10th birthday, I remember having a picnic in the park and running around the playgrounds playing hide-and-seek. For my 21st, I remember going to a local bar, Baja Bean, and getting the coveted sombrero so everyone would know I was celebrating my big day. For my most recent, the 26th, I rode in a small seaplane over the city, then landed into the river.

Birthdays have always been, and always will be, a celebration of my life. It’s the progression over time, despite my best efforts to stay as healthy as I possibly can, that I’ve found to be somewhat discouraging at times.

When I blow out my 27 candles next year, there will certainly be a diminishment in my physical abilities. But I won’t be dwelling on it. I’ll be thinking about all of the new things I did, the places I went, and the people I met.

To read the original article, please click here.

I’m on the transplant list, now what?

In Jerry Cahill’s latest edition of The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. Selim Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center discusses what happens once a patient is on the transplant list.
The first three major steps are:
  1. Create a strict exercise program with the hospital rehab center and integrate it into the patient’s schedule.
  2. Meet with a nutritionist in order to maintain proper weight.
  3. Educate! Meet with the care team in order to understand the entire process – both pre and post transplant.
The transplant process is a long one – and thoroughly detailed – in order to increase the chances of success. Tune in to learn more from Dr. Arcasoy.

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medial Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

NuvoAir Launches Air Next spirometer– and it uses Bluetooth!

by- Market Insiders, PR Newswire

“The Air Next uses Bluetooth Low Energy, which is a more efficient and cost-effective form of wireless technology, to instantly forward this data from the spirometer to a smartphone or tablet.”

If you’re like me and you very much dislike the extra ten seconds it takes out of your day to write down and journal your spirometry numbers, keep reading. And too, if you’re like me and you forget to bring that journal sheet with you to your doctor to show him your numbers, fear not- you don’t even have to leave your house. Just share it through the cloud. Yes, I know… another cloud.

For those of us who have received a transplant– I believe you know this well. After your surgery you are to use spirometry everyday. Everyday. For a few reasons we are told. To check for rejection, if you’re spirometry numbers are declining. To see, for both personal and medical purposes where you live (what your baseline FEV1 is). Then if you want to brag and show someone. Me: “Look mom, I am taking care of myself. Today I went up 3%.”
It’s very important. My doctors use my home numbers as if I’m doing my PFT’s at their office.
And lastly, this new Air Next looks cool! It’s not like the one hospitals give you that looks like you’re blowing into a 1950’s portal, that’s designed like the inside of a pinball machine. Seriously, check this thing out!

To keep reading visit the article below; also make sure to check out the images:
http://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/nuvoair-launches-air-next-revolutionary-new-home-device-to-help-those-with-serious-lung-conditions-1001941321

CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 68: CIRCUIT TRAINING 3

For people with cystic fibrosis, getting “back” into shape is a common occurrence. Because of the nature of the disease, patients often experience set backs in both their health and fitness routines. But, exercise is an important and essential part of remaining compliant with treatments and medications in order to live a longer, healthier life with CF. Continue reading CYSTIC FIBROSIS WIND SPRINT 68: CIRCUIT TRAINING 3

New Promising Results from Phase 3 of Combination Therapy

Findings from a phase 3 trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of tezacaftor in combination with ivacaftor in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) who were homozygous for the Phe508del mutation were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The Phe508del mutation has been known to result in greatly reduced conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity and a loss of chloride secretion, which can lead to impaction of mucus in the airways, gastrointestinal tract, and exocrine organs, with the potential for severe clinical consequences including gradual loss of lung function, nutritional deficits, pulmonary exacerbations, and respiratory failure. It is the most prevalent CFTR mutation worldwide, and affects approximately 46% of American CF patients.

Previous data has shown Ivacaftor’s association with a rate of progressive decline in lung function that is lower than that in untreated patients. In a phase 2 clinical trial involving patients who were homozygous for the Phe508del mutation or heterozygous for the Phe508del and G551D mutations, when combined with the investigational CFTR corrector tezacaftor, it has exhibited enhanced CFTR function and improved lung function.

In August, just one month removed from Vertex’s announcement of positive datafrom Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies, Rare Disease Report covered the acceptance of applications for the use of the tezacaftor/ivacaftor combination treatment in this patient population by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA).

The phase 3 trial enrolled a total of 510 patients 12 years and older with CF who were homozygous for the Phe508del CFTR mutation at 91 sites in the U.S., Canada, and Europe from January 30, 2015 to January 20, 2017. Patients were randomly assigned to be administered either tezacaftor and ivacaftor (administered as a fixed-dose combination tablet containing 100 mg of tezacaftor and 150 mg of ivacaftor in the morning and a tablet containing 150 mg of ivacaftor in the evening) combination therapy or placebo for 24 weeks.

In total, 475 patients completed the full 24 weeks of the trial, with 93.6% (n=235) in the tezacaftor-ivacaftor group and 93% (n=240) in the placebo group. While no significant difference in the body mass index (BMI) was experienced between the groups at week 24, the use of the combination therapy led to a significantly greater absolute change from baseline in the predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) than placebo. Despite advances in standard-of-care therapy, patients with CF continue to lose lung function at a rate of an estimated 1% to 3% per year. This trial exhibited a significant effect of the combination therapy compared to the placebo, as the mean absolute change from baseline in FEV1 through week 24 was 3.4 percentage points in the former, compared to 0.6 in the latter.

The most common adverse events (AEs) among the enrolled patients included infective pulmonary exacerbation, cough, headache, nasopharyngitis, increased sputum production, pyrecia, hemoptysis, oropharyngeal pain, and fatigue. The incidence of AEs was similar in both the group for combination therapy and the placebo group, however, those treated with lumacaftor-ivacaftor in the phase 3 did not experience an increased incidence of respiratory events (33 patients [13.1%] vs. 41 patients [15.9%]).

This improved safety profile of the tezacaftor-ivacaftor combination supports its use in a broad range of patients with CF, and, if approved, the therapy will be the third of Vertex’s drugs approved for CF patients, and the second intended specifically to treat patients with F508del mutations (Orkami [lumacaftor/ivacaftor]).

For original article please visit: http://www.raredr.com/news/phase-3-combination-therapy-cystic-fibrosis?t=physicians

For the published study please visit: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1709846?query=genetics#t=articleDiscussion

Newly Discovered CF Mutations Could Be Why Some People with CF are Living Longer

Researchers hypothesize that the newly-discovered mutations help re-hydrate the airways, discouraging bacterial build-up in the lungs.

Despite a narrow average lifespan, there is a big range in how severely cystic fibrosis (CF) affects the lungs and other organs depending on an individual’s specific genetic variation, and even in how long patients sharing the same, most common genetic mutation are able to survive with CF.

This led researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital to wonder if other genetic mutations could be protective against CF’s effects. Recent findings published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology suggest that may be the case.

“There are some patients at one end of extreme severity who need a lung transplant very early in life, then others whose clinical presentation seems to stabilize so that they can live into the fifth and sixth decades of life,” says Pankaj Agrawal, MBBS, MMSc, principal investigator and medical director of The Manton Center’s Gene Discovery Core at Boston Children’s, who was the co-first author on the study.

To find out why, Agrawal and researchers at Boston Children’s — including Ruobing Wang, MD, a pulmonologist, and Craig Gerard, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Respiratory Diseases — conducted the first-ever longitudinal analysis of genetic modifiers related to CF.

They combed through a population of nearly 600 CF patients registered at the Boston Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center and found five individuals who stood out because of their advanced age — in their 50s or 60s — and relatively normal lung function.

“Given the large size of our center’s patient population, we were able to find a number of individuals at this rare ‘extreme,'” says Wang, who was co-first author on the paper.

A new hypothesis for mitigating cystic fibrosis

To discover the genetic variants, the researchers collected blood from these patients and performed whole exome sequencing on their DNA, analyzing the “coding” section of the genome that is responsible for most disease-related mutations.

Sequencing the genes of these five Boston Children’s patients — a cohort known as “long-term non-progressors” — the researchers found a set of rare and never-before-discovered genetic variants that might help explain their longevity and stable lung function.

The gene variants are related to so-called epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs), semi-permeable cellular pathways responsible for reabsorbing sodium in the kidney, colon, lung and sweat glands.

“Our hypothesis is that these ENaC mutations help to rehydrate the airways of CF patients, making it less likely for detrimental bacteria to take up residence in the lungs,” says Wang.

The discovery brings ENaCs into the limelight as a potential new therapeutic target.

“For example, if we could target ENaCs with a small molecule or an antibody-based drug, we might be able to incur a protective effect against CF’s progression,” says Agrawal, who is also a physician in the Boston Children’s Division of Newborn Medicine.

Based on their findings, the team is now doing further studies to analyze the genetics of patients at the other end of the CF spectrum — those with extremely severe clinical presentation of symptoms at a young age.

Story Source:

Boston Children’s Hospital. “Some people with cystic fibrosis might live longer because of genetic mutations: Researchers hypothesize that the newly-discovered mutations help re-hydrate the airways, discouraging bacterial build-up in the lungs.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 October 2017. <https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171025150620.htm>.

Materials provided by Boston Children’s HospitalNote: Content may be edited for style and length.

Please Join Us for a Free Private Screening of Up for Air at CUMC

Please join us for a FREE private film screening of
UP FOR AIR

Tuesday, May 9, 2017
6:00 – 8:00 PM

Reception followed by screening and Q & A with Jerry Cahill and the film’s Continue reading Please Join Us for a Free Private Screening of Up for Air at CUMC

Stream My Documentary, Up For Air, FREE this week!

We’re still celebrating Jerry Cahill’s 5 year post transplant anniversary by giving away his documentary, Up For Air, for FREE through April 30th!

Use discount code “BigAir” to stream!

Phase 2a CF corrector study

Galapagos doses first patient with novel CF corrector GLPG2222

Galapagos NV (Euronext & NASDAQ: GLPG) announces dosing of the first patient with cystic fibrosis (CF) Class III (F508del and a gating mutation like G551D) with novel CF corrector GLPG2222 as an add-on to Kalydeco®[1] in a Phase 2a study. Galapagos further announced the opening of an Investigational New Drug (IND) file with the US Food & Drug Administration for GLPG2222, triggering a $10 million milestone payment.
Continue reading Phase 2a CF corrector study

Hopeful new clinical trails for nonsense mutations

Translarna’s Turn In Cystic Fibrosis And Brodalumab’s Approval Tardiness

http://seekingalpha.com/article/4043273-translarnas-turn-cystic-fibrosis-brodalumabs-approval-tardiness

Welcome to your weekly digest of approaching regulatory and clinical readouts. PTC Therapeutics (NASDAQ:PTC) is awaiting data in the first quarter with its transcription modulator Translarna in nonsense Continue reading Hopeful new clinical trails for nonsense mutations