For Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infections, How Well Antibiotics Work May be Affected by pH, Oxygen

By Heather Buschman, PhD

People living with cystic fibrosis (CF) spend their entire lives battling chronic lung infections that are notoriously resistant to antibiotic therapy. Yet a one-size-fits all approach to wiping out the offending bacterium may not be the best approach for all patients with the disease, according to a new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Continue reading For Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infections, How Well Antibiotics Work May be Affected by pH, Oxygen

Livestreaming of the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC)

North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference
Opportunity: Register Now for the Livestream Content
Dates: NACFC will be held October 18-20
The North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) brings together researchers and health care professionals from around the world to discuss the latest in cystic fibrosis research, care, infection, treatment, and drug development.
You can explore conference sessions along with the experts! Join us online for three livestreamed plenaries, follow-up Facebook Live Q&As with the speakers, and additional livestreamed workshops and symposia that were hand-selected by members of the CF community, including members of Community Voice. You will find the schedule for these sessions below. The plenary sessions are the major keynote sessions that are presented to all attendees. Each plenary will be followed by a Facebook live Q&A session with the plenary presenters.
During the third plenary session, keep an eye out for Community Voice Melanie Abdelnour, who will be sharing about the importance of partnering with her care team.
Additionally, you will have access to view the content from all other sessions where speakers have consented to share their presentations through the sync-to-slide feature 6 weeks after the conference. Stay tuned for more details!
Register now to livestream the plenaries, workshops, and symposia.
Thursday, October 18, 2018
  • Advancing Basic Science Toward a ‘One-Time’ CF Cure – 09:45 am – 11:05 am MT
  • Pro/Con: Current Debate in Pulmonary Treatments – 09:45 am – 11:05 am MT
  • Controversial Practices – Helpful or Harmful – 02:00 pm – 03:25 pm MT
  • Healthy Habits: Promoting Physical & Mental Health Through Sleep, Exercise, & Nutrition – 02:00 pm – 03:25 pm MT
  • Plenary 1: Improving Outcomes of Infections in the Age of CFTR Modulators – 04:30 pm – 06:00 pm MT (6:30-8 ET)
  • Facebook Live: Infection Research: Mission Possible,  6:30 pm MT (8:30 pm ET) 
Friday, October 19, 2018 
  • Plenary 2: Anti-inflammatories & Mucociliary Clearance Therapies in the Age of CFTR Modulators – 9:00 – 10:00 am MT (11:00 – 12:00 pm ET)
  • Facebook Live: Glad You Brought It Up: Mucus and Inflammation, 12:15 pm MT (2:15 pm ET)
  • The Changing Face of Pulmonary Exacerbation Treatment – 10:30 am – 11:55 am MT
  • Progress & Promise of the CFTR Modulator Pipeline – 10:30 am – 11:55 am MT
  • Novel Approaches to Modulate CFTR – 02:00 pm – 03:20 pm MT
  • Nutrition Research – 02:00 pm – 03:20 pm MT
Saturday, October 20, 2018 
  • Plenary 3: Partnering: The Oldest New Idea to Improve CF Care – 9:00 – 10:00 am MT (11:00 – 12:00 pm ET) 
  • Facebook Live: Howdy, Partner! A Live Q&A, 12:15 pm MT (2:15 pm ET)
  • CF Airway Inflammation – 10:30 am – 11:50 am MT
  • Progress in CF Pulmonary Disease – 10:30 am – 11:50 am MT
  • Pain Management in CF – 02:30 pm – 03:55 pm MT
  • ‘Adulting’ With CF – 02:30 pm – 03:55 pm MT
If you have any questions, please email communityvoice@cff.org.
Best,
The Community Voice Team

Telavancin Promising Potential Treatment Option for MRSA in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

By Kristi Rosa

Responsible for several issues ranging from skin infections and sepsis to pneumonia and bloodstream infections, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus continues to plague patients in the health care and community setting, as well as the providers who treat them.

When acquired in patients with cystic fibrosis, clinical outcomes are known to be even worse, affecting several organs—primarily the lungs—and resulting in an increased rate of declined respiratory function as well as infections that can have severe, and sometimes deadly, consequences.

Now, however, for the first time, investigators have found that telavancin—a drug that is currently used to treat skin infections and hospital-acquired pneumonia—has potent in vitro activity and low resistance development potential when used against S aureus isolates in patients with cystic fibrosis, making it a promising potential treatment option for this population.

“Telavancin (TLV) is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2009 for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and in 2013 for the treatment of cases of nosocomial pneumonia, however its application for the treatment of CF-MRSA pneumonia infections was not known, so our studies are contributing to extending the application of TLV for CF treatment,” Adriana E. Rosato, PhD, associate professor in the department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute told Contagion®. “We were also inspired by the fact that CF patients have a short life time—until 40 to 50 [years]—so our priority is to contribute to better treatment in this patient population.”

Dr. Rosato and her team hypothesized that TLV might be a promising treatment option for CF-patient-derived MRSA and MSSA infections, as in vitro studies have shown that TLV has activity against MRSA.

To prove this, the investigators screened a total of 333 strains of CF patient-derived S aureus of the wild-type or small-colony-variant phenotype, collected from both adults and children at 3 different cystic fibrosis centers: Houston Methodist Research Institute, UW Health and the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research. TLV was found to display activity against all 333 strains collected.

When testing the activity of the drug against 23 MRSA strains, the investigators observed intermediate resistance to ceftaroline (CPT)—a new beta-lactam antibiotic that targets PBP 2a in MRSA—in 20 of the strains, and high-level resistance to CPT in 3 of the strains. The authors note that although high levels of resistance to CPT is rare, intermediate resistance is more common in patients who have chronic infections.

“Among all strains, the TLV MIC90 was 0.06 mg/liter, i.e. 8-fold lower than the daptomycin (DAP) and CPT MIC90 and 25-fold lower than the linezolid (LZD) and vancomycin (VAN) MIC90,” the authors write.

Using time-kill experiments, the investigators assessed the in vitro effectiveness of TLV compared with DAP, VAN, and CPT. They found that TLV showed activity against all tested strains and displayed rapid bactericidal activity as well. The activity profile for the drug at a free serum concentration of 8 mg/liter showed that TLV performed better than VAN (16 mg/liter), LZD (10.4 mg/liter), and CPT (16 mg/liter).

The investigators also set out to determine the fate of mutation selection that could be projected by the potential prolonged use of TLV in patients with cystic fibrosis. To do this they looked at 3 specific strains: AMT 0114-48, WIS 664, and TMH 5007. They found that due to the ease of mutation selection which had been noted in control strains, TLV mutant resistance is independent of the CF patient background of the strains.

“We demonstrated that TLV has bactericidal activity against the S aureus strains tested, including those against which CPT and LZD displayed reduced activity, which might provide TLV a significant advantage over the drugs currently used to eradicate those strains and prevent future exacerbations,” the study authors write.

A clinical trial is currently underway to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of TLV in patients with cystic fibrosis, who usually need dose adjustment because of an increase in the volume of distribution and clearance.

“[The next step for our research is] to perform in-vivo analyses studies that could lead to translational application/clinical trial,” Dr. Rosato added. “However, we are limited in research funds to continue our investigations.”

Original article here.

Machine learning to help cystic fibrosis decision-making

By James Hayes

New research claims to have demonstrated that machine learning techniques can predict with a 35% improvement in accuracy – in comparison to existing statistical methods – whether a cystic fibrosis patient should be referred for a lung transplant.

The research, led by Professor Mihaela van der Schaar of the Alan Turing Institute at the University of Oxford, has been generated through a partnership between The Alan Turing Institute and charity the Cystic Fibrosis Trust. Continue reading Machine learning to help cystic fibrosis decision-making

AIT’s Inhaled Nitric Oxide Shows Potential in Fighting Bacterial Infection Prevalent in CF Patients

By Alice Melao

Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) was shown to be an effective antibacterial agent against Mycobacterium abscessus infection in preclinical studies, as well as in a pilot clinical trial, according to AIT Therapeutics.

The company discussed the latest data on its NO product in two poster presentations during the 3rd Annual World Bronchiectasis Conference held recently at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

NO is a small molecule that is an important mediator of immune defense mechanisms against infections. The compound has been shown to have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against several strains of bacteria that often infect patients with underlying lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF).

Continue reading AIT’s Inhaled Nitric Oxide Shows Potential in Fighting Bacterial Infection Prevalent in CF Patients

Cinnamon Oil Compound Might Block Bacteria Like P. aeruginosa from Forming Biofilms

By: Alice Melao

A natural component found in cinnamon oil, known as cinnamaldehyde or CAD, may be able to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria from spreading in an organism and inhibit their ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms, researchers show.

These findings may support further study into anti-microbial medications that can help control the behavior of these so-called superbugs, or treatment-resistant bacteria, which represent a serious healthcare problem for people with cystic fibrosis and other diseases.

The discovery was reported in “Cinnamaldehyde disrupts biofilm formation and swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa,” published in the journal Microbiology.

“Humans have a long history of using natural products to treat infections, and there is a renewed focus on such antimicrobial compounds,” Sanjida Halim Topa, PhD, a researcher at Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, and lead study author, said in a university news release. “Natural products may offer a promising solution to this problem.”

Cinnamaldehyde, one of the major components of cinnamon oil, is responsible for its characteristic flavor. This compound is known to have antimicrobial activity against many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa; a stomach ulcer-causing bacteria called Helicobacter pylori; and Listeria monocytogenes, which is responsible for the food-borne infection listeriosis.

“We hypothesized that using natural antimicrobials, such as essential oils, might interfere in [drug-resistant] biofilm formation,” Topa said. “Though many previous studies have reported antimicrobial activity of cinnamon essential oil, it is not widely used in the pharmaceutical industry.”

Working with researchers at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the team conducted several experiments to evaluate the impact of different concentrations of cinnamaldehyde on P. aeruginosa biofilms.

They found that non-lethal amounts of the essential oil compound could disrupt by 75.6 % antibiotic-resistant, preformed P. aeruginosa biofilms. Cinnamaldehyde was found to prevent the production of a bacterial-signaling protein essential for bacteria communication and biofilm formation. [Biofilms, or microbe communities whose growth is facilitated by the thick and sticky mucus that marks CF, are known to promote antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa lung infections.]

In a concentration-dependent manner, cinnamaldehyde also could reduce the motility of the bacteria, preventing them from spreading elsewhere, the scientists reported.

These findings, the researchers wrote, show “CAD can disrupt biofilms and other surface colonization phenotypes through the modulation of intracellular signaling processes.”

They are now investigating the use of cinnamaldehyde embedded-wound dressings as a way to treat skin infections.

Original article here.

Importance of Early Diagnosis, Treatment of NTM Infections

By Ashraf Malhas, PhD.

An earlier diagnosis and treatment of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) may positively affect the patient’s lung function, a study suggests.

NTM are a group of bacterial species, found in soil and water, which are not usually associated with human disease, except if they infect susceptible individuals, such as CF patients.

An increasing incidence of NTM infections in CF patients has been observed, with recent studies reporting a prevalence of 32.7%. The exact reasons behind this, the risk factors, the species involved, and effective treatments for NTM infections in CF patients remain largely unknown.

In the study “Clinical course and significance of nontuberculous mycobacteria and its subtypes in cystic fibrosis,” published in the journal BMC Infectious Diseases, researchers analyzed the prevalence of NTM infections in CF patients to identify factors associated with these infections, as well as monitor current treatments.

The study initially involved 360 CF patients, of whom 30 (8%) were identified as being positive for NTM infection. Of these, 28 patients were further analyzed, and their results compared with 26 matched CF patients not infected with NTM (the control group).

Within the NTM group, 17 patients were infected with a class of NTM known as slow-growing, eight patients were infected with rapidly growing NTM, while three were positive for both types.

Those infected with slow-growing NTM were generally older (range of 6.4 to 41.6 years) than those infected with the rapid-growing types (3.1 to 21.5 years), but that difference did not reach statistical significance. However, the age at CF diagnosis was significantly lower in the slow-growing NTM group compared to the rapid-growing NTM group.

When lung function was assessed in the two groups, researchers found that lung function as measured by predicted expiratory flow was significantly higher before NTM infection, regardless of the type of NTM.

Regarding treatment patterns, the team found that significantly more patients infected with slow-growing NTM had received penicillin/beta-lactamase and rifampin following infection compared to before infection.

“An earlier CF diagnosis was associated with a higher isolation of slow-growing NTM and greater antimicrobial use after infection,” the researchers wrote, adding that “NTM acquisition is associated with a worsening of [lung function]. Thus, both the early diagnosis and treatment of an NTM infection in patients with CF may positively impact lung function.”

The team believes that “increased awareness by clinicians on different NTM subtypes and more universal treatment plan for NTM infection in the CF population may positively impact patient management and outcomes.”

Original article here.

Triclosan, often maligned, may have a good side — treating cystic fibrosis infections

By Chris Waters

Maybe you’ve had the experience of wading in a stream and struggling to keep your balance on the slick rocks, or forgetting to brush your teeth in the morning and feeling a slimy coating in your mouth. These are examples of bacterial biofilms that are found anywhere a surface is exposed to bacteria in a moist environment.

Besides leading to falls in streams or creating unhealthy teeth, biofilms can cause large problems when they infect people. Biofilms, multicellular communities of bacteria that can grow on a surface encased in their own self-produced matrix of slime, can block immune cells from engulfing and killing the bacteria or prevent antibodies from binding to their surface.

On top of this, bacteria in a biofilm resist being killed by antibiotics due to the sticky nature of the matrix and activation of inherent resistant mechanisms, such as slow-growing cells or the ability to pump antibiotics out of the cell.

Biofilms are one of the primary growth modes of bacteria, but all antibiotics currently used clinically were developed against free-swimming planktonic bacteria. This is why they do not work well against biofilms.

My laboratory studies how and why bacteria make biofilms, and we develop new therapeutics to target them. Because antibiotic resistance is the most problematic aspect of biofilms during infections, we set out to identify novel molecules that could enhance antibiotic activity against these communities.

We discovered that an antimicrobial that has recently obtained a bad reputation for overuse in many household products could be the secret sauce to kill biofilms.

The hunt for antibiotic superchargers

To find such compounds, we developed an assay to grow plates of 384 tiny biofilms of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We did this to screen for molecules that enhance killing by the antibiotic tobramycin. We chose this bacterium and this antibiotic as our test subjects because they are commonly associated with cystic fibrosis lung infections and treatment.

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at particular risk from biofilm-based infections. These infections often become chronic in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and are often never cleared, even with aggressive antibiotic therapy.

After we screened 6,080 small molecules in the presence of tobramycin, we found multiple compounds that showed the antibiotic enhancement activity we were searching for. Of particular interest was the antimicrobial triclosan because it has been widely used in household products like toothpaste, soaps and hand sanitizers for decades, indicating that it had potential to be safely used in CF patients. Triclosan has also garnered a bad reputation due to its overuse, and states like Minnesota have banned it from these products. The Food and Drug Administration banned its use from hand soaps in September 2016. This ruling was not based on safety concerns, but rather because the companies that made these products did not demonstrate higher microbial killing when triclosan was added, compared to the base products alone.

Another fact that piqued our interest is that P. aeruginosa is resistant to triclosan. Indeed, treatment with either tobramycin or triclosan alone had very little activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but we found that the combination was 100 times more active, killing over 99 percent of the bacteria.

We further studied this combination and found that it worked against P. aeruginosa and other bacterial species that had been isolated from the lungs of CF patients. The combination also significantly enhanced the speed of killing so that at two hours of treatment, virtually all of the biofilm is eradicated.

Our efforts are now focused on pre-clinical development of the tobramycin-triclosan combination. For CF, we envision patients will inhale these antimicrobials as a combination therapy, but it could also be used for other applications such as diabetic non-healing wounds.

Although questions about the safety of triclosan have emerged in the mainstream media, there are actually dozens of studies, including in humans, concluding that it is well tolerated, summarized in this extensive EU report from 2009. My laboratory completely agrees that triclosan has been significantly overused, and it should be reserved to combat life-threatening infections.

The next steps for development are to initiate safety, efficacy and pharmacological studies. And thus far, our own studies indicate that triclosan is well tolerated when directly administered to the lungs. We hope that in the near future we will have enough data to initiate clinical trials with the FDA to test the activity of this combination in people afflicted with biofilm-based infections.

We think our approach of enhancing biofilm activity with the addition of novel compounds will increase the usefulness of currently used antibiotics. Learning about how these compounds work will also shed light on how bacterial biofilms resist antibiotic therapy.

Original article here.

Anaerobic bacteria cultured from CF airways correlate to milder disease-a multisite study

Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria were quantitated in respiratory samples across three cystic fibrosis (CF) centres using extended culture methods. Subjects, ages 1–69 years, who were clinically stable provided sputum (n=200) or bronchoalveolar lavage (n=55). Eighteen anaerobic and 39 aerobic genera were cultured from 59% and 95% of samples, respectively; 16/57 genera had a ≥5% prevalence across centres. Analyses of microbial communities using co-occurrence networks in sputum samples showed groupings of oral, including anaerobic, bacteria whereas typical CF pathogens formed distinct entities. Pseudomonas was associated with worse nutrition and F508del genotype, whereas anaerobe prevalence was positively associated with pancreatic sufficiency, better nutrition and better lung function. A higher ratio of total anaerobe/total aerobe colony forming units was associated with pancreatic sufficiency and better nutrition. Subjects grouped by factor analysis who had relative dominance of anaerobes over aerobes had milder disease compared to a Pseudomonas-dominated group with similar proportions of subjects being homozygous for F508del. In summary, anaerobic bacteria occurred at an early age. In sputum producing subjects anaerobic bacteria were associated with milder disease suggesting that targeted eradication of anaerobes may not be warranted in sputum producing CF subjects.

Full article here.

Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations

NovaBiotics Ltd (“NovaBiotics”) announces that its oral therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF), Lynovex®, has met the study objectives of the CARE CF 1 clinical trial.

CARE CF 1 assessed the effects of two weeks of Lynovex treatment as an adjunct to standard of care therapy (SOCT) in CF, compared to placebo plus SOCT. This trial was designed to determine whether the inclusion of Lynovex capsules alongside SOCT lessened the clinical impact of exacerbations in adults with CF, as measured by symptom severity and levels of bacteria and inflammatory mediators in sputum and blood.  CARE CF 1 was a 6-arm study with the primary objectives of determining the optimal dose and regimen of Lynovex in patients with exacerbations of CF-associated lung disease and to further evaluate the safety and tolerability of Lynovex in exacerbating CF patients.  Continue reading Positive Data from the CARE CF 1 Clinical Study of Oral Lynovex in Cystic Fibrosis Exacerbations