Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

By Michele Wilson PhD

The buildup of mucus in the lungs is an ongoing challenge faced by people with cystic fibrosis, and knowing whether they should seek medical attention is not always clear.

Recently, Mologic – a developer of personalized diagnostics – have developed a tool which they hope will help guide people with cystic fibrosis so they can avoid unnecessary stays in hospital.

The app-embedded algorithm converts data collected from a urinary test to a traffic light result, which indicates whether a patient is stable or in need of medical intervention.

Recently, Mologic, announced that they are launching a clinical trial to assess the company’s urine-based diagnostic tool, ‘HeadsUp’.

To learn more about how this point-of-care diagnostic tool could help improve healthcare for people with cystic fibrosis, we spoke with Gita Parekh, Head of R&D at Mologic.

How do you define pulmonary exacerbation, and why is it important that it is monitored in people with cystic fibrosis? Continue reading Monitoring Pulmonary Exacerbation in Cystic Fibrosis: The Hunt for Urine-based Biomarkers Begins

Lung Plethysmography Procedure

By HH Patel, M.Pharm

Similar to spirometry and pulse oximetry, lung plethysmography is a tool within the broad umbrella of pulmonary function tests. It is a type of diagnostic procedure used to measure the amount of air in the lungs after inhalation or exhalation.

Also referred to as body plethysmography, lung plethysmography provides an idea about how efficiently the lungs are functioning. It is also especially useful in characterizing types of pulmonary abnormality and implementing appropriate treatment approaches depending on the diagnosis.

Continue reading Lung Plethysmography Procedure

Anaerobic bacteria cultured from CF airways correlate to milder disease-a multisite study

Anaerobic and aerobic bacteria were quantitated in respiratory samples across three cystic fibrosis (CF) centres using extended culture methods. Subjects, ages 1–69 years, who were clinically stable provided sputum (n=200) or bronchoalveolar lavage (n=55). Eighteen anaerobic and 39 aerobic genera were cultured from 59% and 95% of samples, respectively; 16/57 genera had a ≥5% prevalence across centres. Analyses of microbial communities using co-occurrence networks in sputum samples showed groupings of oral, including anaerobic, bacteria whereas typical CF pathogens formed distinct entities. Pseudomonas was associated with worse nutrition and F508del genotype, whereas anaerobe prevalence was positively associated with pancreatic sufficiency, better nutrition and better lung function. A higher ratio of total anaerobe/total aerobe colony forming units was associated with pancreatic sufficiency and better nutrition. Subjects grouped by factor analysis who had relative dominance of anaerobes over aerobes had milder disease compared to a Pseudomonas-dominated group with similar proportions of subjects being homozygous for F508del. In summary, anaerobic bacteria occurred at an early age. In sputum producing subjects anaerobic bacteria were associated with milder disease suggesting that targeted eradication of anaerobes may not be warranted in sputum producing CF subjects.

Full article here.