The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC)

Women with CF, we need your expertise and opinions!

Become a member of the CF-Patient Task Force to discuss sexual and reproductive health issues that affect women with CF.  As patients with CF live longer, CFReSHC is committed to patient-engaged research through partnerships with people with CF, researchers, and advocates.  Continue reading The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC)

College and CF – Spring 2018 Scholarship Recipient Guest Blog

By: Holly Beasley

Approaching college while living with Cystic Fibrosis can be undoubtedly frightening. Although, great challenges bring great rewards. This is what I have come to learn during my time at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While I am only a sophomore at the university currently, I hope the knowledge I have gathered through my journey thus far will serve to touch others with CF.

I believe that living with Cystic Fibrosis requires honesty with yourself and others. Therefore, I must be completely honest with you regarding the college experience while living with CF. I do not aim to discourage but to instead challenge you to prevail. I think a unique strength was placed within all of us with Cystic Fibrosis to surmount any challenge that presents itself in our lives. One of these being college, if you so choose.

College with Cystic Fibrosis will certainly not always be easy. As you may know, sick days, lengthy therapy routines, and hospitalizations come with the territory. Combine all of this with the pursuit of higher education and one can become overwhelmed. Balance and prioritization become key in the life of a college student with CF. I know I have spent countless nights reading my textbook while my Vest was simultaneously shaking my lungs. There have also been times when I completed assignments while lying in my hospital bed. This is where balance comes in to play. Finding a system that makes time for both school and health care is crucial, but I want you to be certain that it is also achievable. Despite some extra setbacks and effort, I finished reading all of those pages in my textbook and an assignment has yet to be turned in late. Now, this is where prioritization becomes a major factor. In order to be an efficient student, your health must come first. If doing both becomes too taxing on your body, please remember that it is ok to give yourself a break from school. This has been a difficult lesson for me to learn as a student who always strives for perfect grades. The times I have put school before my health, it has never worked in my favor. I only became sicker, causing a worse impact on my academic performance than if I would have taken the time to recover initially. Carving an hour or so out of my day for therapy when I first noticed signs of sickness would have been much easier than the eventual hospitalizations that resulted from the neglect of this fact. Always put your health first. The aspirations you are seeking through your college journey can only become a reality if you are alive and well to participate in these realized dreams.

All of this may seem rather challenging. So how does all of this ultimately become rewarding? Well, that is entirely up to you. I’d like to give some insight on how this process has rewarded me, personally. This might be the same reasoning that inspires you to pursue higher education or you might have a unique drive that motivates you. Either way, hone in on this sense of why it is all worth it.

Each day attending college rewards me because it serves as a constant reminder that I am equally as capable as anyone without Cystic Fibrosis. We are all different and many of us have encountered at least some degree of a setback in our lives. Mine just happens to be Cystic Fibrosis, but I can work with this along-side my peers. One classmate may have had a parent pass away, another battled a different disease or any other challenge that life may present. Yet, we can all come together in one classroom in order to learn and grow as equals. College allows me to reflect on the fact that the circumstances life presented me with do not define me as lesser. Instead, they exist to strengthen me so that I may become more. Life with Cystic Fibrosis has not been easy and this has never been truer than in my time at college. As I sit here now, I can still honestly say that I am happy to have Cystic Fibrosis. We are forced to realize how special we truly are when challenged by this disease. Yes, I have experienced setbacks and hard times while in college. They have not defeated me and they will not defeat you. At times, I may have to exert extra effort because of my CF. The reward of knowing that I got the job done regardless is much greater than any challenge that college or Cystic Fibrosis may introduce.

Tips for Surviving a Holiday Admission

Guest Blog By: Lauren Jones Hunsaker

Most of us have had to suffer through a holiday admission at one point.  It’s a reality of our disease, which, for most of us, never made a habit of consulting our social calendars before burdening us with an exacerbation.  I’ve spent several Christmases, birthdays, wedding anniversaries and many-a-Thanksgiving admitted.  As far back as middle school, most of my holidays were spent in the hospital simply because it was an advantageous time for an admission.

It’s not an easy thing to endure for kids or adults.  On a good day, being in the hospital is boring, uncomfortable and tedious.  The holidays magnify our misery by adding self-pity and a serious case of F.O.M.O. to the litany of grievances.  However, there are a few easy things you can do to weather the emotional storm of a holiday admission:

  1. Make a To Do List. While a day of nothing but channel-changing can seem never ending, a daily to-do list can help compartmentalize your day and alleviate the monotony of an admission.  Reading, exercising, playing games or journaling at specific times can be helpful distractions and keep you from staring wistfully out of your window.
  2. Enjoy Holiday T.V. Ordinarily, I don’t watch a lot of television.  But during the holidays there are so many classic movies, parades and specials on, allow yourself to indulge in the holiday deluge.  If nothing else, it helps pass the time and connects you to the outside world (“Hey, did you catch It’s a Wonderful Life for the sixteenth time on NBC?”  “I sure did!” “I don’t really understand why ‘Hee Haw!’ is funny.” “Me either, but Clarence is my favorite.”).
  3. Schedule Holiday Events Post-Discharge. The holidays are the holidays because of family.  The pilgrims will not cast a pox on your house if you host Thanksgiving the following weekend so ask family members if they are willing to attend a second family gathering after your discharge.  This gives you something to look forward to and helps temper loneliness while your family memorializes turkey carving on Facebook Live.
  4. Try a Little Empathy. No one wants to be in a hospital on Christmas, including doctors, nurses and nurse’s assistants.  I know what you’re thinking – “they’re getting paid to be there.”    And so as to preempt your next argument, yes, some are getting paid a higher wage for working on a holiday.  But remember that many don’t have a choice in their work schedules, just as we don’t have a choice as to when we’re admitted.  Staff are away from their families and missing holiday gatherings so they can take care of patients.  Take a moment to tell a favorite nurse thank you for working on the holiday.  Sometimes making someone else feel better makes you feel better too.
  5. Order in a Special Meal. Diet restrictions permitting, indulge in a holiday craving (i.e., turkey with stuffing, Chinese takeout, multiple desserts).  Your doctors will love that you’re packing in some extra calories and it’ll give you a break from repetitious hospital food.
  6. Take Advantage of Tech. Twenty years ago, when we would emerge from an admission (shielding our eyes from the blazing sun, unaccustomed to human life), we had no idea what had occurred during our fourteen days of solitude.  Gone are the days.  With social media and constant connectivity, we rarely experience the same isolation we once did.  Use today’s technology to cyber-attend family events from afar—FaceTime into family dinner or Skype into religious celebrations.  Social media can sometimes (and ironically) exacerbate loneliness, but use its advantages to stay connected during the holidays.  Feeling included can boost morale and help you power through an admission.

Deadline to Enroll in a 2018 Marketplace Plan Ends Friday December 15th!!

The deadline to enroll in a 2018 Marketplace health insurance plan is Friday, December 15, 2017.  A person can visit to create an account and review options for coverage.  Then the person can apply for coverage for  2018.  All plans on the government Marketplace offer essential benefits, such as emergency room visits and prescription drug coverage, as well as preventive care including shots and screenings.  The plans offered are run by private insurance companies.  Many states have a variety of plans available.
Some people in the CF community think that the Affordable Care Act has been repealed.  This NOT true.  The Affordable Care Act is still the law of the land.
This means that some people with CF may be eligible for premium help when purchasing a policy on the Marketplace.  The household income cut off is much higher than the cut off for Medicaid which means many people with CF may be eligible for help paying their premiums if their plan is purchased through the Marketplace.
 Some states run their own Marketplaces.  When a person goes to the site will link them to their state marketplace if the state has their own marketplace.
In some cases the premium help that is available is higher than the help that has been available in prior years.
The only way to enroll in a health plan through the Marketplace after December 15, 2017 is if you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period.  A person qualifies for a Special Enrollment Period if the person has certain life events occur such as losing health coverage, moving, having a change in income, getting married or having a change in family size.
If a person with CF is without health insurance coverage or wants to see if a better more affordable option is available then he or she should go to to see what is available before time runs out.

Only I Can Look Into My Mirror

Guest Blog By: Brennen Reeves

If I were to count all of the scars on my body, the ones visible to a bystander at the beach, I’d need your fingers and toes, plus mine. And someone to mark the tallies. Thirty-eight. I’ve counted. From my chest, to my stomach, up to my neck, and down to my ankles the grooves are endless it seems. I don’t think I have any on my back but then again I cannot see my back and I still have trouble with sensation from the bilateral lung transplant I received in 2011, so I wouldn’t be able to feel them either. Continue reading Only I Can Look Into My Mirror

USACFA Annouced by CF Foundation as a Recipient of 2017 Impact Grant

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has announced the recipients of its second annual Impact Grants. The Impact Grants Program provides funding to unique projects by and for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their family members. CF is a rare, genetic disease that progressively limits the ability to breathe and ultimately causes premature death.

Continue reading USACFA Annouced by CF Foundation as a Recipient of 2017 Impact Grant

A Tribute to Everyone with Cystic Fibrosis

Dear CF Roundtable Blog readers,

I would like to share a drawing that I recently created. Occasionally, in my spare time, between four treatments a day, working, cooking food, attempting exercise, and the intermittent phone call or meet up with friends, I hone my artistic skills. In all honesty, it is maybe every few months, but when I do create something, it brings me much pleasure. Cystic fibrosis, the greatest blessing and the greatest curse in my life, obviously affects me daily yet provides the most inspiration.

Continue reading A Tribute to Everyone with Cystic Fibrosis

Home Spirometers: A Useful Tool in Tracking CF Symptoms and Progress

Guest Blog By: Meranda Honaker

Over the last several months my health has continued to decline despite being compliant and diligent with my healthcare routine. In July I developed a fever during a trip to Boston to speak to a biotech company about my journey with cystic fibrosis. I developed a fever and by the end of my visit, I was unable to walk up steps without severe dyspnea. I was so exhausted from feeling sick I would return to my hotel room to lay in the bed for hours to rest. My chest pain and shortness of breath became so severe in the coming days that I could no longer take a deep breath. I checked my SpiroPd home spirometer which displayed a definite decline in my lung function. I immediately contacted my CF clinic to see my CF doctor. Initially, despite feeling bad, I assumed I was feeling poorly and decided not to rush to CF clinic. Sometimes I have a bad day or few bad days health wise and begin to improve on my own. Once I saw my lung function had declined I knew I needed to be seen in CF clinic rather than waiting it out.
Continue reading Home Spirometers: A Useful Tool in Tracking CF Symptoms and Progress

Sign up for BreatheCON Sept 8th and 9th!

By Jeanie Hanley MD, President of USACFA and
John Mercer, BreatheCon 2017 Co-Chair

Sign up today for this FREE virtual event for adults with cystic fibrosis.

Our USACFA director, Mark Levine, is a featured Keynote Speaker on Friday and our CF Roundtable columnists, Aimee Continue reading Sign up for BreatheCON Sept 8th and 9th!

The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC) Patient Task Force Meeting is on September 18th!

By Kelly Gilmore

On Monday September 18th from 12:30pm PST- 2:30pm PST we are having a virtual discussion with CF women, and you’re invited! We need your help in understanding what aspects related sexual and Continue reading The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC) Patient Task Force Meeting is on September 18th!