You are invited! CF Transplant MiniCon

Another virtual event for our adult CF community!

About CF MiniCon: Transplant
This virtual event will explore all stages of the transplant process and allow those who are considering a transplant, preparing for transplant, or post-transplant to connect with others, learn more about the process, and share their experiences.

The CF MiniCon will feature a keynote presentation followed by storytelling panel discussions and small group video breakouts.

Check out the agenda at https://cff.swoogo.com/minicontx/agenda and register now, https://cff.swoogo.com/minicontx.

This event is open to adults with CF, their family members, and caregivers age 18 or older.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 15
6:30 – 10 p.m. ET | 5:30 – 9 p.m. CT | 4:30 – 8 p.m. MT | 3:30 – 7 p.m. PT

How registries can be used to advance our understanding of the CF population

By Abaigeal Jackson and Christopher Goss

Patient or disease registries were first used in monitoring health over 60 years ago [1]. For rare diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF), these early efforts were instrumental in defining the population with the disease and tracking their clinical outcomes.

People living with rare diseases today face particular challenges including treatment availability, a lack of resources, and disease severity. Special efforts are required to undertake research for better treatments and possible cures [[2], [3]]. With CF, set standards in specialised care [4] allow high-quality care to be delivered to patients through networks of specialist or accredited CF centres in many countries. CF registries work by bringing patient data together from specialist CF centres and accumulating data on a relatively rare condition over patients’ lifetimes. The strength of CF registry studies therefore originates from the large number of subjects studied, high rates of coverage by the patient registries and lengthy patient follow-up [5].

One of the more comprehensive CF patient registries is the US CF Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR). In 1966, the CFFPR was established to study the natural history of the disease and now contains detailed data on >48,000 individuals with CF [5]. Using national birth and death data, the CFFPR estimates that it holds information on 81–84% of all people with CF in the US. The CFFPR has been used to evaluate survival and temporal changes in survival, predictors of survival, and many other clinical studies in CF [[6], [7]]. Similar advances have come from other registries. Data from the European CF Society Patient Registry (ECFSPR) was used to project the number of European CF patients in 2025 [8], and provide knowledge about differences in average year to year lung function decline among CFTR mutation classes [[8], [9]].

In this review, we address key aspects of CF registries including 1) the origin of national CF registries, 2) the use of registries for monitoring the health of the population, 3) the power of conducting longitudinal analysis of registry data, 4) knowledge gleaned from changing demographics, 5) the evolving area of international comparisons of registries, 6) strategies for sustaining registries and 7) CF registries of the future. CF patient registries have both strengths and weaknesses. With a rare disease like CF, the strengths and opportunities for advancing CF science clearly outweigh the weaknesses inherent to observational data.

To continue reading please click here.

CF Foundation ‘Venture Philanthropy’ Model Crucial to CF Breakthroughs

By Larry Luxner

When the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) was established in 1955, most people with cystic fibrosis (CF) didn’t make it to their sixth birthday. Today, the average life expectancy of a CF patient is 47 years.

To date, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved 12 CF therapies. Three of them are CFTR modulators that treat the basic disease-causing defect, benefiting 60 percent of all patients, and more therapies are on the way.

Preston W. Campbell III, the CFF’s president and CEO, directly attributes this dramatic improvement to the foundation’s philosophy of “venture philanthropy.”

“We are now in Phase 3 CFTR trials that, if successful, will mean that as early as next year, more than 90 percent of all individuals with CF will have a highly effective therapy targeting CF’s basic defect,” he said. “More therapies that treat the complications of CF are in the pipeline than ever before.

“It begs the question: how did all of this happen?”

Campbell answered that during his March 26 presentation, “Patient advocates taking a real stand in drug development: How the CFF worked with biotech and pharma to find a cure,” at the 2018 World Orphan Drug Congress USA in Oxon Hill, Maryland.

Back in 1960, the Bethesda, Maryland-based foundation broke ground by establishing a Care Center Network to provide multidisciplinary care. Within five more years, it had formed a patient registry.

With only $400,000 in the bank, it would also commit $11 million to research, Campbell said. “Five years later, in 1985, the basic CF defect was identified, and in 1989, the CFTR gene was discovered. That opened the floodgates,” he added.

Campbell’s predecessor, Robert J. Beall, created the Therapeutics Development Program — now called its Venture Philanthropy Model — in 1998 to entice industry to focus on CF, and specifically on CFTR as a target. Its three components were financial assistance, research tools and scientific advice, and a clinical trials network.

“We would lower the risk for industry to come into the CF space. We also made our research tools and scientific advice freely available, and we also embedded the best scientists in the world in these industry programs,” said Campbell, who took over from Beall as head of the CFF in January 2016. “Finally, in order to make sure clinical trials were safely and efficiently done, we created a clinical trials network that originally had seven centers and now has 89.”

In the beginning, CFF’s investments were typically in the $1.5 million range. Ultimately, the foundation invested more than $100 million in Aurora and its successor, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, whose headquarters are in Boston.

To date, the FDA has approved three Vertex CFTR modulators: Kalydeco (ivacaftor) for patients with the G551D mutation in the CFTR gene (2012); Orkambi (lumacaftor/ivacaftor)for patients who are homozygous for F508del, the most common mutation in the CFTR gene (2015); and Symdeko (tezacaftor/ivacaftor) for homozygous F508del patients as well as others (2018).

“Payments are milestone-based, so we pay for success,” Campbell said. “A scientific advisory committee determines if milestones are met and if the project should continue. Successful programs offer a return on our investment, so if the program is foundering, we shake hands and walk away.”

To continue to full article, please click here.

Sign up for BreatheCON Sept 8th and 9th!

By Jeanie Hanley MD, President of USACFA and
John Mercer, BreatheCon 2017 Co-Chair

Sign up today for this FREE virtual event for adults with cystic fibrosis.

Our USACFA director, Mark Levine, is a featured Keynote Speaker on Friday and our CF Roundtable columnists, Aimee Continue reading Sign up for BreatheCON Sept 8th and 9th!

New health bill replaces hope with fear in cystic fibrosis patients

http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/healthcare/340084-new-health-bill-replaces-hope-with-fear-in-cystic-fibrosis

Letter from Preston W. Campbell, III, M.D.

As the Senate considers its proposal for healthcare reform, I urge lawmakers not to forget the millions of people who will rely on this legislation for lifesaving medicines and care. There is much more at stake with the Better Continue reading New health bill replaces hope with fear in cystic fibrosis patients

Subject: CF MiniCon: Transplant – May 21 Virtual Event for Adults With CF

This year the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation will be supporting three virtual events created by and for adults with CF to connect and share their experiences. In 2016, a group of adults with CF created BreatheCon, a two-day event that had a powerful effect in connecting community members. This year, in addition to BreatheCon, we are also introducing two CF MiniCons, which are one-day, topic-specific virtual events.

While last year’s BreatheCon was a pilot program, with 188 attendees and limited mostly to word of mouth promotion, this year we encourage you to spread the word about these virtual events to all adults with CF. Please note these events are open only to adults with CF (not to Care Center staff).

CF MiniCon: Transplant – May 21

On Sunday, May 21 from 6:00 – 9:30 p.m. Eastern Time, members of the CF community will be hosting CF MiniCon: Transplant, where adults with CF can have an honest and open dialogue about the transplant process.

This virtual event will include presentations, group chats, and small group video breakouts on a variety of aspects of transplantation that are unique to people living with CF. Discussion will focus on lifestyle, not on medical topics.

All adults with CF age 18 and over are welcome to attend CF MiniCon: Transplant. Registration is open now through May 18 at www.cff.org/minicon. For questions or more information, email  breathecon@cff.org.

Additional 2017 Events
Please be on the lookout for additional details on CF MiniCon: Young Adult Transition (July 22) and BreatheCon 2017 (September 8-9) in the weeks leading up to the events. If you would like to recommend someone from your community who has CF and is age 18 or over to help plan these events, or if you have any questions, please email Danielle Lowe Cipriani at dcipriani@cff.org.

We look forward to working with you to support virtual connections for people living with CF.

Thank you,
Drucy Borowitz, M.D.

Vice President of Community Partnerships

USACFA Scholarship Opens June 1st 2017-June30th for Fall 2017!

Please share with young adults who would be interested and qualified!

The United States Adult Cystic Fibrosis Association (USACFA) is excited to offer the Lauren Melissa Kelly Scholarship award for the Fall semester 2017. The scholarship will range from $1500 to $2500 and be awarded to adults with cystic fibrosis who are pursuing career certifications, associates, and bachelor’s degrees.

Continue reading USACFA Scholarship Opens June 1st 2017-June30th for Fall 2017!

New on CFF.org: Family Planning

NEW ON CFF.ORG: FAMILY PLANNING & PARENTING WITH CF
As people with cystic fibrosis are living longer, healthier lives, many are considering having families of their own.

To help people in the CF community make informed family planning decisions, Continue reading New on CFF.org: Family Planning

Maxing Out Your Strides – Mark A. Levine

By Mark Levine

Here we are again, on the precipice of another Great Strides Walk season. Not sure about you but I have already sent out my second email, a gentle reminder, to my entire list to increase the size of my team and boost my donations. It’s an exciting time of the year and a great event to be a part of that fulfills a lot in my Continue reading Maxing Out Your Strides – Mark A. Levine

Tell Congress to Oppose the American Health Care Act

The House of Representatives will soon vote on legislation that would jeopardize access to affordable and adequate health care coverage for people with cystic fibrosis.

The bills would effectively eliminate Medicaid expansion and alter Medicaid’s funding structure in a way that would reduce access to care Continue reading Tell Congress to Oppose the American Health Care Act