Third Annual CF Roundtable Gratitude Dinner

On October 17th, during the NACFC conference in Denver, CO, CF Roundtable (USACFA) hosted a dinner event honoring 68 social workers and other CF Care team members.

It was hosted by our very own Beth Sufian, JD and an informative presentation was given by Isabel Stenzel Byrnes.

The evening ended with a Gratitude Ceremony recognizing the importance of the CF team members to the health and well being of people with CF. Many attendees said the evening was the highlight of their attendance at NACFC.

Halloween themed goodie bags were handed out to each attendee, which contained a tote bag, with a lung design created by our talented director, Ella Balasa.

A big thanks to everyone who attended!

We have a limited number of totes remaining. This #givingtuesday be one of our first donors and you can recieve one of our very limited edition totes when you donate $100 or more to CF Roundtable! First come, first served basis!

 

Have you talked to your CF Team about your sexual and reproductive health?

By: Georgia Brown

I often say that there is no modesty in medicine.  I mean, we routinely talk with medical professionals who are used to gross anatomy.  But I realized I was wrong when I broached sexual and reproductive health (SRH) issues with my CF physician.

After I attended the CFF MiniCon on SRH, I was so energized by the honest discussions that I had handwritten notes to share at clinic the next day.  After giving an overview of the event, I listed items clinics should be talking about and offered my notes for use as a reference. Continue reading Have you talked to your CF Team about your sexual and reproductive health?

CF Foundation asking for Public Comment on Lung Transplant Referral Guidelines

Dear CF Community,

The CF Foundation seeks your input on the draft of the Lung Transplant Referral for Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Guidelines. This guideline is one in a series of guidelines for advanced stage lung disease; the other guidelines in progress on this topic include: Advanced Lung Disease Consensus Guidelines and Post Lung Transplant Consensus Guidelines.

A committee of CF health care providers, transplant healthcare providers, and an adult with CF researched and developed the consensus recommendation statements presented in the draft. It is our hope that you will add your input and feedback to ensure that our community issues actionable practice recommendations for lung transplant referral for individuals with cystic fibrosis.

To systematically collect feedback from the CF community, we have created an on-line tool which is linked below. We recommend that you review the attached document, Lung Transplant Referral for Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Guidelines PDF, and use the link below to enter your comments.

Submit comments here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LTxReferralPublicComment

The deadline for comments is Wednesday, October 10th, 2018, 5:00 PM, Eastern.

We value your input. Thank you in advance for taking time to review and provide us with feedback on this very important aspect of CF care.

If you have any questions, please contact shempstead@cff.org.

Sincerely,
Albert Faro

Albert Faro, M.D.
Senior Director of Clinical Affairs
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation | National Office

The open door policy – An important and under-recognized activity of the adult CF center

By Anna Sze Tai and Sue Morey

Improvement in survival in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a substantial increase in numbers of the adults with CF past few decades [12]. In many parts of the world, the number of adults now exceeds the numbers of children with CF [12]. Adults with CF face the daily challenge in balancing education, work and family commitments with their disease management. Patients often need to contact the Adult CF specialist team for advice on disease management and coordination of care around their work and family time-table. Current ECFS guideline recommends patients have ready access to the CF center for telephone advice for emergency management or consultation [34]. The ‘open-door’ policy of adult CF centers is an important component of ambulatory care in adults with CF, ensuring a timely and expert-level response to patient queries. Management of unscheduled patient-initiated contacts is an important and often under-recognized function of the adult CF team. There is a paucity of data on the nature and frequency of these unscheduled contacts and their potential impact (and demands) on the organization of the CF team.

In this issue of the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, Burnet et al. reported the results of a two-staged prospective study of unplanned patient-initiated contacts in a single adult CF center (n = 410 patients) [5]. During the first stage, all patient-initiated contacts were prospectively recorded over a four-month period. Four physicians and three nurses prospectively documented how and why patients contacted the team and the time spent responding to these requests. During the second stage, contacts generated from a subset of 212 patients were prospectively recorded to explore the association between contact frequency and disease severity.

During the first stage, 259/410 (65%) patients initiated 1067 contacts over 4 months, averaging 13.3 contacts per day. Average time spent addressing patient contacts by all participants combined was 8 h and 7 min per work week. This was likely an underestimate given not all team members (e.g. allied health specialists) who might be contacted by patients participated, and data collection was limited to working hours during weekdays. Nevertheless, the result confirmed that managing unscheduled contacts added a significant workload to the CF team. Factors associated with greater contacts (≥5 contacts/year) included female sex and greater disease severity, reflected in severe airflow obstruction (FEV1 ≤ 30% predicted), ≥ 5 physician visits/year and ≥ 1 hospital admission/year.

The frequency of unscheduled contact in adults with CF was markedly higher than that observed amongst high-risk COPD patients, reflecting the greater healthcare demand of adults with CF [6]. Interestingly, only <20% of requests were related to medical issues (e.g. exacerbations), whereas the bulk of requests were related to daily management issues (e.g. script renewal), intravenous antibiotic requests, administrative queries and non-urgent miscellaneous matters. This perhaps reflects that the adult CF center has generally provided comprehensive, primary up to expert-level tertiary care to their adults with CF. The adult CF center can be viewed by the patient as ‘the one-stop shop’ for both their CF and non-CF related healthcare needs. Patients may not be aware of the need for a family physician for their non-CF related healthcare needs, including travel vaccinations, women health issues, age-specific screening (e.g. mammograms, monitoring for hypertension).

This is the first study which demonstrates the significant burden of unplanned contacts on the organization of the adult CF centre. The strength of the study is the prospective design which enables differentiation between planned and unplanned contacts. There was a comprehensive recording of response time in the clear majority of patient contacts (>95%) by the team members as they carry out their day-to-day services within a large CF centre which is an impressive undertaking. The key limitation is the single centre nature of the study which limits its comparability to other centres in other health settings internationally. Nevertheless, Burnet et al. has clearly revealed the burden of unscheduled contacts and highlighted the need for more efficient management strategies. Firstly, development of an effective centralised triaging system (e.g. collective ‘CF Team’ email inbox and phone line) managed by experienced CF staff who prioritise and streamline all incoming requests to appropriate team members can maximize efficiency of the CF team. Secondly, involvement of administrative staff to assist with relevant non-medical requests (e.g. clinic rescheduling, etc) will lighten the burden on the clinical team. Thirdly, ultilisation of new telecommunication and health informatics technologies can potentially improve communication and data transparency. Telehealth technologies (e.g. Smartphone apps, Skype or WhatsApp) have already shown significant promise in improving patient access to care and early treatment in CF, particularly in setting where distance from centre to the patients is considerable and pop-in clinics are likely to be impractical [[7][8][9]]. Some of these telehealth technologies can potentially serve as communication platforms to provide education resources on commonly-asked questions.

To continue reading please visit: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1569199318306982

Vertex Employees Donate $1M to CF and Other Communities via Matching Gift Program

By Carolina Henriques

Vertex Pharmaceuticals employees have raised more million $1 million  using  the Vertex Foundation‘s matching gift program in a show of commitment to causes that include the cystic fibrosis (CF) community, a company press release states.

The dollar-for-dollar matching gift program is being run through the nonprofit Vertex Foundation, established by the company in November 2017 as part of it’s charitable giving goal of donating $500 million to qualified nonprofits and other causes worldwide over 10 years.

To date, more than 500 Vertex employees have used the program to support 753 charities around the globe working to advance work in areas that include healthcare, human services, education, and disaster relief.

Vertex’s charitable commitment has four primary goals: supporting CF patients and caregivers worldwide, including enabling access to Vertex’s medicines; helping underserved students and young women with STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) education; supporting young doctors and scientists; and strengthening and fostering innovation in local communities through health and wellness programs.

“Giving back is in our DNA at Vertex, and our employees have a long history of going the extra mile to improve the lives of patients, students and their neighbors,” Jeffrey Leiden, president, chairman and chief executive officer of Vertex, said in the release. “I’m proud that The Vertex Foundation is able to help extend the impact of our employees’ giving and look forward to seeing the reach of these investments in the causes they care about most.”

Also as part of its 10-year commitment, Vertex awarded $400,000 in scholarships to eligible CF patients and their family members in May as part of its second “All in for CF” scholarship program. In total, 80 scholarships worth $5,000 each were awarded for the upcoming academic year.

Vertex, which specializes in cystic fibrosis, has three approved CF therapies: Kalydeco (ivacaftor), Orkambi (lumacaftor/ivacaftor), and Symdeko (tezacaftor/ivacaftor).

The company is also testing potential triple combination treatments for CF.

For the rest of this article, click here.

How registries can be used to advance our understanding of the CF population

By Abaigeal Jackson and Christopher Goss

Patient or disease registries were first used in monitoring health over 60 years ago [1]. For rare diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF), these early efforts were instrumental in defining the population with the disease and tracking their clinical outcomes.

People living with rare diseases today face particular challenges including treatment availability, a lack of resources, and disease severity. Special efforts are required to undertake research for better treatments and possible cures [[2], [3]]. With CF, set standards in specialised care [4] allow high-quality care to be delivered to patients through networks of specialist or accredited CF centres in many countries. CF registries work by bringing patient data together from specialist CF centres and accumulating data on a relatively rare condition over patients’ lifetimes. The strength of CF registry studies therefore originates from the large number of subjects studied, high rates of coverage by the patient registries and lengthy patient follow-up [5].

One of the more comprehensive CF patient registries is the US CF Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR). In 1966, the CFFPR was established to study the natural history of the disease and now contains detailed data on >48,000 individuals with CF [5]. Using national birth and death data, the CFFPR estimates that it holds information on 81–84% of all people with CF in the US. The CFFPR has been used to evaluate survival and temporal changes in survival, predictors of survival, and many other clinical studies in CF [[6], [7]]. Similar advances have come from other registries. Data from the European CF Society Patient Registry (ECFSPR) was used to project the number of European CF patients in 2025 [8], and provide knowledge about differences in average year to year lung function decline among CFTR mutation classes [[8], [9]].

In this review, we address key aspects of CF registries including 1) the origin of national CF registries, 2) the use of registries for monitoring the health of the population, 3) the power of conducting longitudinal analysis of registry data, 4) knowledge gleaned from changing demographics, 5) the evolving area of international comparisons of registries, 6) strategies for sustaining registries and 7) CF registries of the future. CF patient registries have both strengths and weaknesses. With a rare disease like CF, the strengths and opportunities for advancing CF science clearly outweigh the weaknesses inherent to observational data.

To continue reading please click here.

Antibiotic resistance evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosain cystic fibrosis patients

By Francesca Lucca, Margherita Guarnieri, Mirco Ros, Giovanni Muffato, Roberto Rigoli, and Liviana Da Dalt

Below is a study hoping to define and answer the questions of Pseudomonas aeruginosain, its evolution and the resistance from different antibiotics. The study took place between 2010-2013. Though the study may have some time clauses I believe there are some strong findings for the CF community moving forward.
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Introduction

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen responsible of chronic colonization of the airways in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. There are few European data about antibiotic susceptibility evolution of P aeruginosa in CF patients.

Objectives

The aim of this study is to evaluate the evolution of antibiotic resistance in the period 2010‐2013 in CF patients chronically colonized by P aeruginosa and to highlight the characteristics of this evolution in patients younger than 20 years.

Methods

Clinical and microbiological data were extracted from two electronic databases and analyzed. Antibiotic resistance was defined according to European Committee of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing for levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem, amikacin and ceftazidime. The between‐group comparison was drawn with the Chi‐square test for proportions, with the T‐test for unpaired samples for normally distributed data and with Mann‐Whitney test for non‐normally distributed data. Significancy was defined by P < .05.

Results

Fifty‐seven CF patients, including thirteen subjects aged less than 20 years, were enrolled. P.. aeruginosa antibiotic sensitivity decreased significantly for fluoroquinolones, mainly in patients aged <20 years, while it increased for amikacin and colistin. The analysis of minimum inhibitory concentration confirmed these trends. In pediatric patients treated with more than three antibiotic cycles per year, greater resistance was found, except for amikacin and colistin.

Conclusion

An evolution in P aeruginosa antibiotic resistances is observed in the 4‐year period studied. Responsible and informed use of antibiotics is mandatory in CF.
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Read the whole clinical journal here. 

Antibiotic resistance evolution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients (2010‐2013) Francesca Lucca,Margherita Guarnieri,Mirco Ros,Giovanna Muffato,Roberto Rigoli,Liviana Da Dalt. First published: 1 April 2018. https://doi.org/10.1111/crj.12787

Lessons From the Road: Avoid the ER

By: Sydna Marshall

A few weeks ago I found myself in the ER at midnight in a new city.  Let me backup the story a bit. I had planned a road trip to Dallas with my bestie (we’ll call her “A” for now) for a beauty conference. Two days before the trip I ran a 102.6 fever for the better part of the day. The morning of, as I was doing my treatments and finishing my packing, I felt the familiar band of pain around my chest. I mentally ruled it out as merely remnants of pain from my blockage earlier in the week and carried on with my morning. I drove the hour north to pick up A and start our trek up to Dallas. We stopped for tacos and queso along the way. I took some pain meds for that persistent and annoying band of pain. A few hours later, we checked into our hotel, picked up our beauty boxes for the conference, and had a happy hour cocktail in the bar followed by sushi in the rotating tower.

Fast forward to 9p: CF changes on a dime. Suddenly, that pesky band of pain that I’ve absently noticed and ignored for the day is front and center. I can barely take a breath, much less a full breath, post-treatment. By 11p, I’ve laid in bed silently crying as the pain spikes up to an 8 and then back to a 6. It dawns on me that the band of pain is pleuritic pain. After texting multiple Cysters and weighing the pain with the inability to breathe, my recent 20% drop in lung functions and the fever I ran earlier, I finally make the decision to wake up A (who is for once sleeping peacefully, without interruptions, in the absence of her four kiddos) and have her drive me to the ER.

We arrive at the ER with this naïve idea that my CF clinic, albeit on-call at this late hour, will communicate with the CF clinic in Dallas. I’d already given A all of the information, phone numbers, and instructions for getting everyone, including my husband Adam, on the same page. Over the course of the evening and early morning hours, hundreds of texts and calls between A, Adam, and the on-call care team at home transpire in an effort to expedite the process.  Since it’s not my first rodeo with pleuritic pain, I’ve already determined before we even got settled in the ER that I desperately need instant-relief pain meds and a chest X-ray. Am I the only one who self-diagnoses? When you’re in and out of the doctor for the litany of health problems in addition to CF, you become the expert on your own body. I digress.

Over the course of the 12 hours in the ER, my port is accessed a total of four times, with one of them being a needle repositioning, before we get anywhere. To administer IV medication and run blood tests, two different nurses start dueling peripheral lines, one in my left hand and the other in my right elbow.  Meanwhile, other nurses attempt to get my port working, which won’t flush or draw back blood. My vein blows on one of the lines, and the other is dangerously close. I have a chest X-ray taken, a CT scan with contrast of my lungs, every blood test imaginable, an EKG, several rounds of morphine, two doses of vancomycin and two albuterol treatments.  I’m told I have a potential pulmonary embolism, a virus causing pleurisy, a mucus plug, or sepsis. Twelve hours in, and about 10 minutes after Adam arrives at the Dallas ER, my repeated requests to be moved to my home clinic, care team, and hospital are heard and I’m care-flighted from Dallas back home (Adam has to drive back home). Once admitted to my home hospital, they have me repeat nearly every test the Dallas ER did less than 24 hours prior as none of my medical records transferred with me from the ER. Five days later the medical records from the ER finally make their way to my home hospital and care team.  In the end, it was determined that I had a virus, which accounted for the difficulty in breathing, pleuritic pain, and fever. It was a very long, traumatic, stressful, and a trying 12 hours away from home. And, I missed my conference entirely, but that’s another story.

I’ve since had some time to reflect on this jaunt to the ER. The biggest takeaway for me – CF clinics do communicate but getting the ER to communicate with the CF care team is nearly impossible.  Having a port is a blessing, but it requires orders from your doctor, not just any doctor, to access and use heparin or cath flow in the event that it’s not working properly (or, in my case, repeatedly accessed incorrectly).  I learned that complaining of chest pain at a new hospital where none of my medical records are accessible means a round of tests to rule out heart problems, despite knowing that it’s my lungs. I learned that transferring medical records from one hospital to another is a royal pain in the you-know-what.

Hindsight is always 20/20, but I know I could have avoided the entire debacle if only I had heeded my inner voice the morning I left for Dallas when I first felt the band of pain around my lungs.  For me, it’s often hard to gauge when it’s important to say no and upend plans, especially when it impacts friends and family around me. If a trip to Walgreens completes a vacation in my house, am I an overachiever for my trip to the ER?