SIX Ways to PAY IT FORWARD to CF ROUNDTABLE!

By Jeanie Hanley, President

Greetings CF Roundtable Subscriber!

May is CF Awareness month. What better way to “Pay It Forward” than by supporting CF Roundtable which has been vital to the CF community! Please consider making a tax-deductible donation today.

This is YOUR CF Roundtable and because of your generosity, YOU have made it possible for nearly 30 years. 100% of your donation goes into the newsletter and many outreach programs. All work is done by volunteers with CF like Andrea, our Executive Editor, whose inspirational words regarding her 18 years of transplant are below:

Eighteen Years of Life Post-Transplant

By Andrea Eisenman, Executive Editor of CF Roundtable

Reflecting back on my life for the last 18 years post-transplant, I am amazed I have lived so long. Way longer than I expected, considering the 50 percent median survival of 5 years after a bilateral lung transplant. I am grateful for this time in which I was able to get married, go back to school for various interests like film and cooking, and care for my mom in her later years, share my life with people I care about and never in recent memory felt this good.

While I have enjoyed a good quality of life, it came with a price of total compliance almost to the point of being neurotic at times (my doctors probably get sick of my calls and emails), a daily exercise regimen and lots of rest. But I found that if I did things I enjoyed like tennis, pickle ball or swimming, it helped get the exercise for that day done while it was fun and social.

I have been extremely fortunate as not only do I have this longevity with transplant and I feel pretty well. Aside from the last 12 months, I have had the ability to travel and do most things my peers do. While I had some setbacks recently, I am starting to feel better. I keep a positive outlook and do what is needed. I can see how precious this gift of life is and I hope that when my time comes to be a donor, the person who gets my organs enjoys them as much as I enjoyed these lungs.

DONATE LIFE!

Please consider Paying It Forward in these six ways:

 

  • Unrestricted Gifts – your contribution will go to the program that needs it most.
  • Milestone Celebration: for a transplant anniversary, birth of a child, wedding, or a birthday. There is no greater reward than celebrating YOU and YOUR accomplishments.
  • Tribute Gifts – donate in honor or in memory of someone.  
  • USACFA Endowment Fund – consider contributing which will get CF Roundtable closer to be self-sustaining forever! Please contact us if you are able to contribute.
  • Matching Gifts – if your employer has this program, then let us know!
  • Bequest – A simple and easy way to remember CF Roundtable in your estate planning.  To establish a bequest, please contact us.

 

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Thank you!

I’m on the transplant list, now what?

In Jerry Cahill’s latest edition of The Path Forward with Cystic Fibrosis, Dr. Selim Arcasoy from Columbia University Medical Center discusses what happens once a patient is on the transplant list.
The first three major steps are:
  1. Create a strict exercise program with the hospital rehab center and integrate it into the patient’s schedule.
  2. Meet with a nutritionist in order to maintain proper weight.
  3. Educate! Meet with the care team in order to understand the entire process – both pre and post transplant.
The transplant process is a long one – and thoroughly detailed – in order to increase the chances of success. Tune in to learn more from Dr. Arcasoy.

This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Columbia University Medial Center and the Lung Transplant Project.

Freedom!

Guest post by: Kathy Russell

Today was a terrific day! We have just experienced a three-day series of high temperatures in the 80s. In the middle of summer that would be quite normal, but getting that kind of weather in April is extremely rare in my part of Oregon. I made the most of those days.

In our front yard, we have a very old and very large black walnut tree. There is a brick planter built around the base of the tree and there are various plants, including several sword ferns, growing in it. The sword ferns are beautiful if they are properly groomed. Each year, when the weather permits, I get out and cut away all of the old fronds to make room for new growth.

I didn’t get to do that last year because of my health. I just didn’t have the energy to do the bending and twisting that the task entails. Also, since I am on continuous oxygen, it makes getting out to the tree a bit problematic. Dragging my portable oxygen concentrator (POC) while I am pruning the ferns is a bit of a pain. I bend over and cut some old fronds, then I have to stand up and drag the POC to my next position. It makes it more of a chore and a lot less fun than it used to be before I was on oxygen.

Yesterday I worked on a couple of ferns that I could reach with the length of hose that is on my big concentrator. That was fairly workable, but I couldn’t go beyond the range of my hose. Also, I couldn’t reach two of the ferns. After about an hour I was getting too hot and decided to stop working on a large fern that was at the end of my tether.

Today, my husband took my large concentrator outside and plugged it into an outdoor outlet. With the 75 feet of hose that I have on it, I had a lot of freedom to move around. I was able to finish the fern that I left yesterday and finish the final two. I didn’t have to worry about running out of hose length and I felt so unencumbered. It was so great to be able to move around like a normal person. I absolutely loved that feeling of freedom. It was almost like not even being on oxygen.

My oxygen saturation stayed in a very good range and I got a couple of hours of fresh air. I was mostly in shade so I didn’t have to worry about being in the sun too long. Having the ability to move around and not have to drag a POC was a real gift as far as I am concerned.

Ground-Breaking Procedure. A major step for science, medicine, the human condition

by Mary Bulman; Independent UK

“Woman spends record six days without lungs thanks to ground-breaking procedure”

Yes you’ve read that correctly.
Yes, it reads six days.

A true miracle! Definitely an understatement.

Though it’s been over a year since this procedure was carried out, it’s one that I believe cannot be shared enough. A huge step for medicine and science- but perhaps a larger one for the human condition and the willingness to live and fight.

“I still don’t believe it happened. It seems very surreal.” says patient Melissa Benoit.
And that’s because it is, Ms. Benoit.

After coming down with the flu the last year 2016, Ms. Benoit was taken from her home in Burlington, Canada to the ICU in a nearby hospital located right outside of Toronto, Canada.  Doctor’s made the spilt decision to go through with a first time procedure in order to save her life. After becoming resistant to most antibiotics, bacteria began to move throughout her body, eventually causing her to lapse into septic shock. One by one her organs started shutting down, due to the decline of her blood pressure.

“Although it had never been carried out before, doctors decided to remove her lungs entirely.”

“What helped us is the fact that we knew it was a matter of hours before she would die,” said Dr Shaf Keshavjee, one of three surgeons who operated on her. “That gave us the courage to say — if we’re ever going to save this woman, we’re going to do it now.”

To learn more about Ms. Benoit and the new breed of surgery that was carried out please continue onto the article below:
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/woman-six-days-without-lungs-waiting-list-donor-organ-burlington-ontario-melissa-benoit-world-first-a7547936.html

USACFA Annouced by CF Foundation as a Recipient of 2017 Impact Grant

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has announced the recipients of its second annual Impact Grants. The Impact Grants Program provides funding to unique projects by and for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) and their family members. CF is a rare, genetic disease that progressively limits the ability to breathe and ultimately causes premature death.

Continue reading USACFA Annouced by CF Foundation as a Recipient of 2017 Impact Grant

A Brief Historical Timeline of CF Research to Date

Cystic fibrosis care has seen such rapid advances that the average CF patient has experienced a dramatic evolution in treatment strategies in their lifetime. Here are some of the biggest milestones that shaped modern-day CF treatments.

Continue reading A Brief Historical Timeline of CF Research to Date

We Can, Right? – Guest blog from USACFA Fall 2017 Scholarship Winner

By: Jacob Greene

Cystic Fibrosis is an awkward disease. Whether it’s coughing attacks in the middle of tests, the infamous CF digestive issues (for professionalism’s sake I will leave it at that, but you know what I mean), or loud treatments in the morning and at night, there are many awkward aspects to cystic fibrosis. CF’s median life expectancy is no different. Continue reading We Can, Right? – Guest blog from USACFA Fall 2017 Scholarship Winner

USACFA’s Fall 2017 Lauren Melissa Kelly Scholarship Winners

The US Adult CF Association (USACFA) is excited to announce our recipients of the Lauren Melissa Kelly Scholarship: Congratulations to Jacob Greene and Elizabeth Shea! They will be awarded $2500 each. Continue reading USACFA’s Fall 2017 Lauren Melissa Kelly Scholarship Winners

5 Inspirational Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis worth Following on Social Media

By Ella Balasa

I’ve created a list of young woman and men who make the most of life despite battling Cystic Fibrosis. They share their experiences, the good and the bad, on social media. They inspire, educate, and spread awareness about CF. As a person with CF myself, though I live a full life and experience similar obstacles and triumphs, I haven’t gotten the courage to show this kind of vulnerability. I hope they show both CF and non-CF people alike that we all can do many things we set our minds to despite having seemingly insurmountable obstacles in our way.

  1. Instagram: Fight2breathe

Caleigh is a 27-year-old woman who received a double lung transplant October 20, 2015. She shares posts about her daily struggles and triumphs in dealing with CF and transplant and now more recently dealing with the rejection of her lung transplant and her rapid health decline. She is incredibly knowledgeable about many procedures and tests her and her doctors discuss and she shares them with her followers in a way everyone can understand. Her genuine personality, charisma, and strength are all palpable through her words through which she relates her true fears, hopes, insecurities, and raw emotions about an unknown future. She finds something beautiful in every hard day, whether that be being able to see her pets, spending time with her loved ones, or just reading the uplifting comments on her posts.

  1. Instagram: lung_story_short

Rima shares her experience of fighting CF through humor and keeping lighthearted. Her sister shares her journey as being her caretaker while she waited for a transplant. She spent many days in the hospital exploring the hallways, playing games, crafting, and making friends with nurses. She has recently received a double lung transplant (5.14.17) and is now sharing her amazing recovery process day by day! Her lung function is increasing quickly and is gaining so much endurance and strength since being transplanted. She shares a lot about CF awareness and is becoming more known through the CF community.

“Hi my name is Rima and I have Cystic Fibrosis. I had come to the point in my health where my old lungs could no longer serve me and I was in need of a double lung transplant. Here I am now at 27 years old with brand new air baggies! It was a long journey but I am made it with the help of my trusty sidekick Laima, my sister. She joined me on my quest for new lungs when I decided to move to Colorado. The transplant center there decided that they didn’t want to do my transplant because they said that my post-transplant care would be tricky and risky due to how resistant the “bugs” in my lungs were to all antibiotics. So then the search for another center began. Thanks to my sister she discovered the U of M in Minneapolis MN with the help of a friend. Since that discovery, we are now part of the U of M family indefinitely. Throughout this whole thing, we decided we wanted to document and share everything Cystic Fibrosis related as well as transplant and organ donation. We started a blog last spring as well as started sharing on social media via Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. We want to help spread awareness because there are so many people out there that are unaware of Cystic Fibrosis. There are also a huge amount of people that aren’t organ donors, many of them just don’t know how to become one but many just avoid the subject due to either personal or religious reasons. Another thing we want to show people with CF is that you can still have a fun-filled adventurous life, you don’t have to live your life cooped up in your house to keep good health. Laughter, sunshine and the outdoors soothes the body and soul! The Cystic Fibrosis community needs a cure, and with the help of spreading awareness, we can help raise funding for research! If you would like to keep up with our story you can follow us on Instagram: @lung_story_stort, Facebook: lung story short and for the blog atwww.lungstoryshort.com” -Rima

  1. Instagram: Tiffrich22

Tiff is a 28-year-old woman who was diagnosed at birth with cystic fibrosis. She resides in sunny California where she got a transplant November 30th, 2016 at Stanford University. A few years ago she started a campaign to meet her idol Taylor Swift at a concert. With the help of family, friends, and strangers, she got her wish. Her campaign led her to start her very own YouTube channel, LUNGS4TIFF, where she helps educate people and raise awareness about CF and the hardships while telling her story through videos. She intends to show others through social Media that having a positive spirit and desire for fun in life helps anyone get through the toughest times. She is thriving and planning for adventures to come.

“Through my Instagram, I have been able to show all of the sides of CF and transplant. I knew I wanted to be real and show the not so “glamorous” side of this disease, as well as the happy go lucky side. I feel by showing the hardships that I have faced, it has helped others know that it’s okay to struggle. I always say that there’s always someone going through much worse and that I’m lucky. Now with new Lungs, I am able to start my second chance at life and go check off my bucket list items. I have been able to check off my first NBA game (Go Warriors) and ride in a hot air balloon! I am blessed and can’t wait to post more about my adventures and my journey with new Lungs.

Another way I use Instagram to help the CF community and foundation is through mine and my best friend, Lea, @SaltyCysters page. We have joined forces to provide awareness and started making workout clothes to motivate the CF community to get their lungs moving and profits go to the CF Foundation to use for research and development towards a cure.

CF Awareness is very important to me. My passion is to help others and I think that by sharing my story via Instagram and all forms of social media, I am able to show that being positive is key to conquering this horrific disease. I will continue to raise awareness and share my story, hoping that CF will soon stand for Cure Found.” – Tiff

  1. Youtube: Staying Salty Youtube Channel

A group of 6 individuals talk, inform, help, and educate about their lives and experiences with CF. They come from all different backgrounds and live all over the country. They each post a video a different day of the week. They make videos on various topics related to living life with CF, including a day in the life, how they tell others about CF, surgeries they’ve had, medication organization, CF clinics and much more. Many videos are informative and interesting to view how others with CF are managing and succeeding in life! They have full-time jobs, they travel, they raise families, and importantly, they raise awareness for the CF community.

  1. Youtube: The Frey Life

A young couple, Mary and Peter, along with their pooch Oliver, share their day to day lives in daily vlogs on their YouTube channel. Mary has CF and they share the details of daily breathing treatments, doctor appointments, and the highs and lows of dealing with a chronic illness, both as a patient and a partner. Besides the aspect of Mary’s diagnosis, they share their strong faiths and their beautiful love story as a couple with their 100K subscribers.