Antibiotic plus probiotic combination may kill off superbugs

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Every year, over 2 million people in the United States develop infections that are resistant to treatment, and approximately 23,000 people die as a result.

These statistics have prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to deem drug resistance “one of the biggest public health challenges of our time.”

Therefore, researchers are hard at work trying to develop ingenious ways of tackling so-called superbugs — bacteria that have become immune to antibiotic treatment.

Lately, researchers have added probiotics to their arsenal against superbugs. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria found in foods, such as yogurt, kefir, pickles, or miso soup.

Only a month ago, for example, a study suggested that simply consuming probiotics on a regular basis could reduce the need for antibiotics, thus helping to curb the drug resistance crisis. Continue reading Antibiotic plus probiotic combination may kill off superbugs

For Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infections, How Well Antibiotics Work May be Affected by pH, Oxygen

By Heather Buschman, PhD

People living with cystic fibrosis (CF) spend their entire lives battling chronic lung infections that are notoriously resistant to antibiotic therapy. Yet a one-size-fits all approach to wiping out the offending bacterium may not be the best approach for all patients with the disease, according to a new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Continue reading For Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infections, How Well Antibiotics Work May be Affected by pH, Oxygen

Sound Pharmaceuticals to present initial data on the STOP Ototoxicity Study at Cystic Fibrosis Conference

SEATTLESept. 25, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Sound Pharmaceuticals (SPI) is pleased to announce that its recent submission to the upcoming North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) Oct. 18-20 has been selected as a late-breaking abstract. This presentation will focus on the incidence and severity of ototoxicity in CF patients undergoing intravenous (IV) tobramycin treatment for acute pulmonary exacerbation. Ototoxicity (hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo or dizziness) is a common side effect of tobramycin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics (amikacin, gentamycin and streptomycin). Currently, there are no FDA approved therapies for the prevention or treatment of ototoxicity or any other type of sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, or dizziness. Continue reading Sound Pharmaceuticals to present initial data on the STOP Ototoxicity Study at Cystic Fibrosis Conference

Telavancin Promising Potential Treatment Option for MRSA in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

By Kristi Rosa

Responsible for several issues ranging from skin infections and sepsis to pneumonia and bloodstream infections, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus continues to plague patients in the health care and community setting, as well as the providers who treat them.

When acquired in patients with cystic fibrosis, clinical outcomes are known to be even worse, affecting several organs—primarily the lungs—and resulting in an increased rate of declined respiratory function as well as infections that can have severe, and sometimes deadly, consequences.

Now, however, for the first time, investigators have found that telavancin—a drug that is currently used to treat skin infections and hospital-acquired pneumonia—has potent in vitro activity and low resistance development potential when used against S aureus isolates in patients with cystic fibrosis, making it a promising potential treatment option for this population.

“Telavancin (TLV) is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2009 for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and in 2013 for the treatment of cases of nosocomial pneumonia, however its application for the treatment of CF-MRSA pneumonia infections was not known, so our studies are contributing to extending the application of TLV for CF treatment,” Adriana E. Rosato, PhD, associate professor in the department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute told Contagion®. “We were also inspired by the fact that CF patients have a short life time—until 40 to 50 [years]—so our priority is to contribute to better treatment in this patient population.”

Dr. Rosato and her team hypothesized that TLV might be a promising treatment option for CF-patient-derived MRSA and MSSA infections, as in vitro studies have shown that TLV has activity against MRSA.

To prove this, the investigators screened a total of 333 strains of CF patient-derived S aureus of the wild-type or small-colony-variant phenotype, collected from both adults and children at 3 different cystic fibrosis centers: Houston Methodist Research Institute, UW Health and the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research. TLV was found to display activity against all 333 strains collected.

When testing the activity of the drug against 23 MRSA strains, the investigators observed intermediate resistance to ceftaroline (CPT)—a new beta-lactam antibiotic that targets PBP 2a in MRSA—in 20 of the strains, and high-level resistance to CPT in 3 of the strains. The authors note that although high levels of resistance to CPT is rare, intermediate resistance is more common in patients who have chronic infections.

“Among all strains, the TLV MIC90 was 0.06 mg/liter, i.e. 8-fold lower than the daptomycin (DAP) and CPT MIC90 and 25-fold lower than the linezolid (LZD) and vancomycin (VAN) MIC90,” the authors write.

Using time-kill experiments, the investigators assessed the in vitro effectiveness of TLV compared with DAP, VAN, and CPT. They found that TLV showed activity against all tested strains and displayed rapid bactericidal activity as well. The activity profile for the drug at a free serum concentration of 8 mg/liter showed that TLV performed better than VAN (16 mg/liter), LZD (10.4 mg/liter), and CPT (16 mg/liter).

The investigators also set out to determine the fate of mutation selection that could be projected by the potential prolonged use of TLV in patients with cystic fibrosis. To do this they looked at 3 specific strains: AMT 0114-48, WIS 664, and TMH 5007. They found that due to the ease of mutation selection which had been noted in control strains, TLV mutant resistance is independent of the CF patient background of the strains.

“We demonstrated that TLV has bactericidal activity against the S aureus strains tested, including those against which CPT and LZD displayed reduced activity, which might provide TLV a significant advantage over the drugs currently used to eradicate those strains and prevent future exacerbations,” the study authors write.

A clinical trial is currently underway to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of TLV in patients with cystic fibrosis, who usually need dose adjustment because of an increase in the volume of distribution and clearance.

“[The next step for our research is] to perform in-vivo analyses studies that could lead to translational application/clinical trial,” Dr. Rosato added. “However, we are limited in research funds to continue our investigations.”

Original article here.

AIT’s Inhaled Nitric Oxide Shows Potential in Fighting Bacterial Infection Prevalent in CF Patients

By Alice Melao

Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) was shown to be an effective antibacterial agent against Mycobacterium abscessus infection in preclinical studies, as well as in a pilot clinical trial, according to AIT Therapeutics.

The company discussed the latest data on its NO product in two poster presentations during the 3rd Annual World Bronchiectasis Conference held recently at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

NO is a small molecule that is an important mediator of immune defense mechanisms against infections. The compound has been shown to have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against several strains of bacteria that often infect patients with underlying lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF).

Continue reading AIT’s Inhaled Nitric Oxide Shows Potential in Fighting Bacterial Infection Prevalent in CF Patients

Phage-Coated Microparticles Treats Lung Conditions like CF

By SterlingAdmin

The methods available to treat bacterial infections are many. But among those with any real and lasting effectiveness, their usage is limited. Antibiotics were once the Holy Grail of medicine to deal with devastating diseases that wiped out entire populations. With them, these suffering conditions were almost entirely wiped out and the populace began to learn how to live without the fear of most children dying at a young age. But, as is well known, the age of antibiotic cure-alls is ending and the time of antibiotic resistance is beginning to reach its peak. So, medical researchers are hard at work on all the other opportunities for dealing with bacteria that don’t require these specific groups of compounds.

The Medicine of Viruses

Phage therapy is one such alternative that has begun to see more extensive use over the past two decades.Bacteriophages are lifeforms that have crafted over evolutionary time a niche focused on using bacteria as their reproductive hosts, killing said host in the process. And since they are living beings as well, they actively engage in the selective pressures of finding ways around resistance against them, rather than being a static attack on bacteria like antibiotics are. This means that even the most feared multi-drug resistant bacterial strains have little to no protection against phages.

The primary downside to this treatment is that phages are highly specialized, having formed themselves to only target a particular host species. Therefore, to deal with certain bacteria, one also has to find and be able to cultivate a certain type of phage. Once that step is accomplished, however, it has been found that they can be altered fairly easily to give them variable methods of attack, so as to minimize any potential side effects on the human body while they are killing the bacteria. They can even be set up to synergistically interact with the human immune system to work together to wipe out the bacterial invasion.

With the right phage strain, the largest remaining issue is how to get them into the human body and to the right type of location and system that the bacteria are also attacking from. A large proportion of phage research has gone into finding new ways to do this very thing, as it is one of the inefficient areas of the therapy and, if improved, can drastically heighten the success rates of the treatment and the types of bacterial diseases that can be combated.

It is difficult and time consuming to produce modified phage, with many of them dying in this fabrication. For bacterial diseases of the lungs, such as the kinds that like to colonize those suffering from cystic fibrosis, there is currently no true delivery method of getting phage into the deep lung tissues. And, of course, getting any single treatment approved requires showing success in some sort of animal model, even though the phages may not translate well or at all to anything other than humans. This is one of the major problems this author has with the current approval setup by governments for medical trials.

Microparticles For A Micro World

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology have been seeking a new method for just such a delivery system. Dry powder formulations has seen some positive benefits for effectiveness in recent years, but there lingers the issue of how to use such a powder to delivery living phages to the right spot. To do so would require a very carefully made powder indeed.

The engineering techniques they brought into play were used to make phage-loaded microparticles (phage-MPs), hollow molecular structures formed using water-oil-water emulsion to keep them stable. The bacteria being combated was the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and several strains of phage against it were chosen for the experiment.

The microparticles were housed in a phage-containing solution, allowing them to be filled with the phage after incubation. Though they were filled in a different way than the usual method of them being inside the MPs. Instead, they cover the exterior in this method after the MPs are made, meaning no phage are lost due to solvent usage during MP fabrication from the prior ways other studies used. Three to five phages were contained on the MPs in order to reduce the likelihood of any possible bacterial resistance.

This delivery mechanism also reduces endotoxin production by the phage, thereby minimizing side impacts of their use, with the reduction bringing them down to 0.078 endotoxin units (EUs), far below the accepted FDA limit of 20 EU in treatments. The technique was first tested on petri dishes containing the bacteria to which the phage-MPs were applied. The P. aeruginosa were modified to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to identify their living location on the plates.

A Complete Victory

After 16 hours of co-incubation, large patches of non-fluorescence showed where the phage had successfully killed off the bacteria, while the control group MPs without a phage coating had no deaths. These zones were also far larger than the applied MP area, showing that the phage were able to spread and extend to other bacteria in the dishes. The same test was done using synthetic sputum to mimic the environment of an animal lung and the bacteria and phages were applied at the same time. There was no visible growth of bacteria after application, showing that the phages were able to both control and wipe them out. A further test showed the phage are also able to get past the protective biofilms of the bacteria that they make under environmental emergencies.

The dry powder formulations were also seen to have a large burst of phages initially, with slow release for two weeks after, the perfect way to allow consistent application and treatment against the bacteria. The final experiment involved using mice infected with the bacteria. A control test using just phage-MPs showed no negative effects on the mice or their lungs after application. Fluorescent phage-MPs also showed that they were only localized to the lungs and nowhere else in the body, as desired. The control using free form phages without microparticles revealed how the dry powder still didn’t allow them to be properly applied, with no major phage levels detected in those mouse lungs, proving that the MPs as a transport vector were required.

When tested on mice infected with P. aeruginosa, the bacterial count dropped by an entire order of magnitude and 100% of the mice survived their pneumonia, while the untreated control group only had 13% survive. For mice with a cystic fibrosis genetic mutation, the same test saw their bacterial counts drop by three orders of magnitude, approaching the limit of what could be detected. The phage-MPs also saw the same effectiveness against multiple strains of the bacteria, meaning that even genetic variance in a population wasn’t enough to defend against them.

A last point of importance is that when testing against a mouse group exposed to phage-MPs long before being infected and later treated, there was no reduction in effect and no antibodies against the phages seemed to develop. So there is likely no performance loss to the treatment if used multiple times.

The New Antibiotics

As a conclusion, the researchers were able to engineer specialized biomaterials made of microparticles that, when coated with bacteriophages, were highly effective at reducing bacterial counts for lung-related diseases, including those resulting from the lowered immune system responses of cystic fibrosis. These phage-MPs are stable and can be stored for a fair amount of time with no loss in phage amounts and can be administered through simple inhalation, meaning younger patients can be treated with less complications.

For lung-related diseases, and likely for broader conditions at large in the medical community, this breakthrough might serve as a major way to allow phage therapy to become more common and used in replacement of or as a sought after alternative to antibiotics. The number of lives this should be able to save in the long run is likely incalculable.

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Triclosan, often maligned, may have a good side — treating cystic fibrosis infections

By Chris Waters

Maybe you’ve had the experience of wading in a stream and struggling to keep your balance on the slick rocks, or forgetting to brush your teeth in the morning and feeling a slimy coating in your mouth. These are examples of bacterial biofilms that are found anywhere a surface is exposed to bacteria in a moist environment.

Besides leading to falls in streams or creating unhealthy teeth, biofilms can cause large problems when they infect people. Biofilms, multicellular communities of bacteria that can grow on a surface encased in their own self-produced matrix of slime, can block immune cells from engulfing and killing the bacteria or prevent antibodies from binding to their surface.

On top of this, bacteria in a biofilm resist being killed by antibiotics due to the sticky nature of the matrix and activation of inherent resistant mechanisms, such as slow-growing cells or the ability to pump antibiotics out of the cell.

Biofilms are one of the primary growth modes of bacteria, but all antibiotics currently used clinically were developed against free-swimming planktonic bacteria. This is why they do not work well against biofilms.

My laboratory studies how and why bacteria make biofilms, and we develop new therapeutics to target them. Because antibiotic resistance is the most problematic aspect of biofilms during infections, we set out to identify novel molecules that could enhance antibiotic activity against these communities.

We discovered that an antimicrobial that has recently obtained a bad reputation for overuse in many household products could be the secret sauce to kill biofilms.

The hunt for antibiotic superchargers

To find such compounds, we developed an assay to grow plates of 384 tiny biofilms of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We did this to screen for molecules that enhance killing by the antibiotic tobramycin. We chose this bacterium and this antibiotic as our test subjects because they are commonly associated with cystic fibrosis lung infections and treatment.

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at particular risk from biofilm-based infections. These infections often become chronic in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and are often never cleared, even with aggressive antibiotic therapy.

After we screened 6,080 small molecules in the presence of tobramycin, we found multiple compounds that showed the antibiotic enhancement activity we were searching for. Of particular interest was the antimicrobial triclosan because it has been widely used in household products like toothpaste, soaps and hand sanitizers for decades, indicating that it had potential to be safely used in CF patients. Triclosan has also garnered a bad reputation due to its overuse, and states like Minnesota have banned it from these products. The Food and Drug Administration banned its use from hand soaps in September 2016. This ruling was not based on safety concerns, but rather because the companies that made these products did not demonstrate higher microbial killing when triclosan was added, compared to the base products alone.

Another fact that piqued our interest is that P. aeruginosa is resistant to triclosan. Indeed, treatment with either tobramycin or triclosan alone had very little activity against P. aeruginosa biofilms, but we found that the combination was 100 times more active, killing over 99 percent of the bacteria.

We further studied this combination and found that it worked against P. aeruginosa and other bacterial species that had been isolated from the lungs of CF patients. The combination also significantly enhanced the speed of killing so that at two hours of treatment, virtually all of the biofilm is eradicated.

Our efforts are now focused on pre-clinical development of the tobramycin-triclosan combination. For CF, we envision patients will inhale these antimicrobials as a combination therapy, but it could also be used for other applications such as diabetic non-healing wounds.

Although questions about the safety of triclosan have emerged in the mainstream media, there are actually dozens of studies, including in humans, concluding that it is well tolerated, summarized in this extensive EU report from 2009. My laboratory completely agrees that triclosan has been significantly overused, and it should be reserved to combat life-threatening infections.

The next steps for development are to initiate safety, efficacy and pharmacological studies. And thus far, our own studies indicate that triclosan is well tolerated when directly administered to the lungs. We hope that in the near future we will have enough data to initiate clinical trials with the FDA to test the activity of this combination in people afflicted with biofilm-based infections.

We think our approach of enhancing biofilm activity with the addition of novel compounds will increase the usefulness of currently used antibiotics. Learning about how these compounds work will also shed light on how bacterial biofilms resist antibiotic therapy.

Original article here.

Defining chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis

By Valerie Waters and Keith Grimwood

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic, multi-system disease due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, leading to ineffective anion channel activity [1]. The resulting impaired mucociliary clearance permits initial acquisition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and, if untreated, the establishment of persistent infection in the CF airways. It has long been recognized that chronic infection, often characterized by a mucoid P. aeruginosa phenotype, is associated with more rapid lung function decline and earlier death in individuals with CF [[2], [3], [4]]. Defining chronic P. aeruginosa infection is, therefore, an important step in identifying CF patients most at risk of lung disease progression. Traditionally, the Leed’s criteria has been used to define chronicity (as having >50% of sputum cultures being P. aeruginosa positive in the preceding 12 months), as it is the only clinically validated definition [5]. However, the Leed’s criteria are difficult to implement in young children unable to provide sputum and further limited by the required number of sputum samples and follow-up time [6].

In this issue of the Journal, studies by Heltshe et al. and Boutin et al. aim to re-define what chronic P. aeruginosa infection means in CF. In a retrospective cohort study using data from the US CF Foundation Patient Registry, Heltshe et al. followed close to 6000 early-diagnosed CF children for approximately 6 years [7]. Two-thirds acquired P. aeruginosa infection and of those, 6% had an initial mucoid phenotype. Furthermore, the majority (87%) of children who developed mucoid infection did so before meeting the definition of chronic infection (at least 3 yearly quarters P. aeruginosa positive in the preceding year). Initial P. aeruginosa infection with a mucoid phenotype has been previously described and is a recognized risk factor for failure of antimicrobial eradication therapy [[8], [9], [10]]. Whether this initial acquisition of a mucoid phenotype represents prior adaptation of P. aeruginosa in the CF host (either undetected or transmitted from a patient with chronic infection) or simply infection with an environmental strain particularly well-suited to the CF airways, is as of yet unknown [11]. It is clear, though, that mucoid P. aeruginosa does have an adaptive advantage in early CF infection as mucoidy was associated with an almost three-fold increased risk of transition to chronic infection in this current study. Despite the presence of this risk factor, however, only 13% of P. aeruginosa infected patients went on to develop chronic infection. Although Heltshe et al. did not provide details as to eradication strategies used in this cohort, this low incidence of persistent infection does speak to the overall effectiveness of current antimicrobial treatment for early P. aeruginosa infection.

Boutin et al. took their investigation a step further by using molecular methods, specifically quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), to define chronic P. aeruginosa infection [12]. In their study, patients with chronic infection had significantly higher levels of P. aeruginosa as measured by qPCR compared to those with intermittent infection. A single P. aeruginosa qPCR measurement in sputum had a sensitivity of 84% (with a specificity of 85%) in detecting chronic infection using a threshold of 103.4 colony forming units (CFU)/ml. A single sputum PCR measure had the advantage of not requiring 12 months of culture results as per the Leed’s criteria [5]. Furthermore, in their small study sample size, PCR was more discriminatory than mucoidy status in predicting chronicity, not surprisingly, given that alginate production (conferring mucoidy) is only one of several virulence factors contributing to the establishment of persistent P. aeruginosa infection in CF [13]. When used in throat swab samples, qPCR had a considerably lower sensitivity (82%) and specificity (56%) in detecting chronic infection, likely due in part to the lower bacterial burden observed in this specimen, compared to sputum. The low specificity of PCR in this setting (positive PCR, negative culture) may reflect the fact that a molecular signal may precede culture positivity. Early detection of P. aeruginosa infection, before culture conversion, in CF patients was originally suggested decades ago using serologic and, more recently, molecular methods [[14], [15], [16]]. Serology, however, has proven disappointing at identifying early P. aeruginosa infection [17]. Nevertheless, early detection may still be possible using highly-sensitive PCR techniques for identifying lower airway P. aeruginosa infection in a young, non-expectorating child. In the study by Boutin et al., P. aeruginosa detection in throat swabs by PCR alone was linked to a positive culture in sputum in three-quarters of cases. Previous studies comparing oropharyngeal cultures to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures in children with CF demonstrated that oropharyngeal cultures had a positive predictive value of only 44%, but a negative predictive value of 95% in diagnosing lower airway P. aeruginosa infection [18]. Performing P. aeruginosa qPCR on culture negative throat swabs may further improve the diagnosis of lower airway infection in young children with CF who are unable to produce sputum, but this approach will still need to be validated by comparative studies employing BAL fluid samples. Unfortunately, using confirmatory induced sputum samples as suggested by Boutin et al., may produce unreliable results as these specimens are poor predictors of lower airway pathogens cultured from BAL specimens in young children with CF [19]. Finally, it is yet to be determined whether an earlier diagnosis of P. aeruginosa infection leads to improved eradication success rates and superior clinical outcomes.

In summary, the recent studies by Heltshe et al. and Boutin et al. further our understanding of how chronic P. aeruginosa infection develops in CF and how to better recognize it [7,12]. Ultimately, prevention of chronic P. aeruginosa infection and its deleterious effects on lung function and survival is the goal.

Original article in Journal of Cystic Fibrosis here.

Potential Therapy for Infections in CF Gets Patent

AB569Arch Biopartners’ treatment candidate for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory conditions, has received a U.S. patent.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued patent 9,925,206 to the University of Cincinnati, which granted Arch Biopartners an exclusive commercial license on all patents related to AB569. The inventor is Daniel Hassett, PhD, a principal scientist at Arch and professor at the University of Cincinnati College Of Medicine.

“This patent issuance, which protects the composition of AB569, gives Arch a stronger commercial position to pursue treating not just CF patients, but also the millions of other patients that have chronic antibiotic resistant lung infections including those with COPD,” Richard Muruve, CEO of Arch, said in a press release. “It also opens the door for Arch to develop treatments for many other indications where antibiotic resistance is a problem, such as urinary tract infections and wound care.”

Bacterial infections in the lungs are a serious problem in patients with CF, COPD, or ventilator-associated pneumonia. Cystic fibrosis patients are susceptible to bacterial respiratory infections as a result of abnormal mucus production in the lungs and airways.

In particular, the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) affects most adult CF patients and 40 percent of CF children ages 6 to 10. The mucoid form of P. aeruginosa is highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and immune-mediated killing. It causes a rapid decline in lung function and a poor overall clinical prognosis.

Antibiotic use in the treatment of CF and COPD patients with chronic bacterial respiratory infections is increasing, which correlates with a higher prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains.

AB569 is a non-antibiotic therapy made of sodium nitrite and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), two compounds approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for human use. The treatment has a different mechanism of action from antibiotics that may increase effectiveness, Arch believes.

“AB569 has two active ingredients that produce a dramatic and synergistic effect at killing many antibiotic resistant bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), which commonly causes severe chronic infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients,” Hassett said. “AB569 has the potential to make a significant medical impact on treating infection where traditional antibiotics fail.”

In preclinical experiments, the therapy showed significant ability to kill several types of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

The safety and pharmacokinetics of a single administration of nebulized AB569 are now being evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial with up to 25 healthy volunteers at the Cincinnati Veterans Affairs Medical Center (CVAMC). Pharmacokinetics refers to how a drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized, and expelled by the body. Enrollment of volunteers started in February.

If the Phase 1 study provides positive results, the company plans to start a Phase 2 trial to test the effectiveness of AB569 in the treatment of chronic lung infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other bacterial pathogens in CF and/or COPD patients.

AB569 previously received orphan drug status from the FDA for the treatment of CF patients infected with P. aeruginosa, and orphan medicinal product designation from the European Medicines Agency.

For original article, click here.

Study Links CF Patients’ Airway Bacteria with Disease Outcomes

By: Diogo Pinto

Researchers have linked variations in the mix of microorganisms in cystic fibrosis patients’ airways to their disease outcomes.

The findings in the journal PLOS One were in an article titled “Fluctuations in airway bacterial communities associated with clinical states and disease stages in cystic fibrosis.

CF patients typically have particular strains of bacterial and fungus in their airways. The usual bacteria suspects include PseudomonasAchromobacterBurkholderiaHaemophilusStaphylococcus, and Stenotrophomonas.

Other bacteria and fungi also inhabit CF patients’ airways, however. These include anaerobic species that do not need oxygen to grow and spread.

Not only do the microbial communities in CF patients’ airways vary by type of microorganism, but also in the relative abundance of each species.

Researchers decide to see if the prevalence and relative abundance of typical CF pathogens and anaerobic microorganisms play a role in the severity of patients’ disease and their lung function.

They analyzed 631 sputum samples collected over 10 years from 111 patients.

The team classified the stage of patients’ disease on the basis of their lung function scores. The yardstick they used was forced expiratory volume in one second, or FEV1. They considered an early stage of the disease to be an FEV1 score higher than 70, an intermediate stage a score of 40 to 70, and an advanced stage a score lower than 40.

Researchers classified disease aggressiveness — mild, moderate or severe — on the basis of change in FEV1 relative to age.

They discovered a link between variations in the prevalance of the six typical CF pathogens, plus nine anaerobic species, and changes in a patient’s disease stage and lung function.

To continue reading, click here.