Blog

The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC) Invitation to Participate

The Cystic Fibrosis Reproductive & Sexual Health Collaborative (CFReSHC) is a patient engagement project that provides women with CF the opportunity to be equal partners with healthcare professionals to shape the future of CF research.  CFReSHC offers women with CF the opportunity to participate on the Governance Board, Research Advisory Panel and Patient Task Force as Patient Partners to develop research projects that directly respond to the questions faced by women with CF.  CFReSHC holds monthly virtual meetings on topics that impact the lives of women with CF like contraception, family building, hormone influences on CF, incontinence and menopause.  As we enter our third year, CFReSHC is looking for women with CF who are passionate about sexual and reproductive health research to join our collaborative who can commit 4-6 hours a month and we provide  a small honorarium for your time commitment.

CFReSCH is looking for a:

  Social Media Strategist who has connections in the CF community or who is willing to engage with the CF community on our behalf.  CFReSHC currently has a social media presence on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and the applicant would need to be able to post 2-3 times per week as well as check the platforms regularly and make responses as needed.  The applicant would need to attend 3 paid monthly meetings often held during work hours.

Grant writer and Coordinator who has connections in the CF community or is willing to connect with the CF community and engage it to seek out funding opportunities for potential grants.  The applicant would need to maintain a database of potential grant opportunities.  An applicant who has experience writing applications is preferred.  The applicant would need to attend 3 paid monthly meetings often held during work hours.

Women with CF are welcome to send a letter of interest to: cfreprohealth@gmail.com.  Together, we will respond to the health needs of the CF community by providing data for healthcare professionals to pave the way for improved sexual and reproductive health resources, healthcare, and knowledge.

Hooray! I Celebrated My Fifth Anniversary – Guest Blog by Kathy Russell

October 3rd, 2018, I celebrated five years since having bilateral mastectomies because of cancer. I have had no recurrence of those cancers and no chemo or radiation therapy. Since I am 74 years old and have CF, I feel very fortunate.

My surgeon would have done just a lumpectomy on the left side, where the initial tumor was found, but I opted for removal of both breasts. I didn’t want to have any more surgeries. If I could have had reconstruction surgery at the time of my mastectomy, I might have opted for that. However, since my surgeon and the plastic surgeon both said that was not an option, I chose to get rid of the whole possibility of future trouble by removing both breasts. Continue reading Hooray! I Celebrated My Fifth Anniversary – Guest Blog by Kathy Russell

Livestreaming of the North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC)

North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference
Opportunity: Register Now for the Livestream Content
Dates: NACFC will be held October 18-20
The North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) brings together researchers and health care professionals from around the world to discuss the latest in cystic fibrosis research, care, infection, treatment, and drug development.
You can explore conference sessions along with the experts! Join us online for three livestreamed plenaries, follow-up Facebook Live Q&As with the speakers, and additional livestreamed workshops and symposia that were hand-selected by members of the CF community, including members of Community Voice. You will find the schedule for these sessions below. The plenary sessions are the major keynote sessions that are presented to all attendees. Each plenary will be followed by a Facebook live Q&A session with the plenary presenters.
During the third plenary session, keep an eye out for Community Voice Melanie Abdelnour, who will be sharing about the importance of partnering with her care team.
Additionally, you will have access to view the content from all other sessions where speakers have consented to share their presentations through the sync-to-slide feature 6 weeks after the conference. Stay tuned for more details!
Register now to livestream the plenaries, workshops, and symposia.
Thursday, October 18, 2018
  • Advancing Basic Science Toward a ‘One-Time’ CF Cure – 09:45 am – 11:05 am MT
  • Pro/Con: Current Debate in Pulmonary Treatments – 09:45 am – 11:05 am MT
  • Controversial Practices – Helpful or Harmful – 02:00 pm – 03:25 pm MT
  • Healthy Habits: Promoting Physical & Mental Health Through Sleep, Exercise, & Nutrition – 02:00 pm – 03:25 pm MT
  • Plenary 1: Improving Outcomes of Infections in the Age of CFTR Modulators – 04:30 pm – 06:00 pm MT (6:30-8 ET)
  • Facebook Live: Infection Research: Mission Possible,  6:30 pm MT (8:30 pm ET) 
Friday, October 19, 2018 
  • Plenary 2: Anti-inflammatories & Mucociliary Clearance Therapies in the Age of CFTR Modulators – 9:00 – 10:00 am MT (11:00 – 12:00 pm ET)
  • Facebook Live: Glad You Brought It Up: Mucus and Inflammation, 12:15 pm MT (2:15 pm ET)
  • The Changing Face of Pulmonary Exacerbation Treatment – 10:30 am – 11:55 am MT
  • Progress & Promise of the CFTR Modulator Pipeline – 10:30 am – 11:55 am MT
  • Novel Approaches to Modulate CFTR – 02:00 pm – 03:20 pm MT
  • Nutrition Research – 02:00 pm – 03:20 pm MT
Saturday, October 20, 2018 
  • Plenary 3: Partnering: The Oldest New Idea to Improve CF Care – 9:00 – 10:00 am MT (11:00 – 12:00 pm ET) 
  • Facebook Live: Howdy, Partner! A Live Q&A, 12:15 pm MT (2:15 pm ET)
  • CF Airway Inflammation – 10:30 am – 11:50 am MT
  • Progress in CF Pulmonary Disease – 10:30 am – 11:50 am MT
  • Pain Management in CF – 02:30 pm – 03:55 pm MT
  • ‘Adulting’ With CF – 02:30 pm – 03:55 pm MT
If you have any questions, please email communityvoice@cff.org.
Best,
The Community Voice Team

I’m Drowning – A researcher-patient’s plea for broader inclusion in cystic fibrosis trials

By: Ella Balasa

I’ve always known cystic fibrosis (CF) is a progressive disease; it destroys lung cells, tightens the small airways in the bottom of my chest, and each day takes me closer to the time when it will have ravaged my lungs. I had never really questioned if there was some way this process could be altered. I accepted that it couldn’t.

Recently, however, this has changed. The epicenter of new CF research is the development of medications that will slow, stop, and hopefully even reverse the effects and damage that CF inflicts on the body. The possibility of the cells in my lungs functioning to their full potential — with CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein function restored and working correctly, expelling chloride out of my cells, hydrating the surface of my lungs, and halting the thick sticky mucus that has caused my airways to be enveloped in a suffocating cloak for all these years — is like a feeling of being rescued when you are drowning.

Unfortunately, I am still drowning.

“I’m very sorry, Ms. Balasa, but you will not be able to be a participant in this clinical trial.” This was the response I received during one of my searches for these drug trials. Excited by the possibility of participating, finding one recruiting at my local adult clinic, I reached out to study coordinators and was informed that I met all but one criterion to participate in the studies. This specific criterion has prevented me from prior trial participation involving other investigational medications treating the symptoms of CF, including anti-infectives and anti-inflammatories.

Most CF studies, including phase I, II, and III trials, require a lung function minimum of at least 40% FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in one second). My FEV1 is 25%, so I am excluded from these trials. Many patients face a similar situation. The 40% threshold biases samples toward a young patient population, as this degenerative condition causes steadily decreasing lung function with time. Furthermore, as CF treatment has rapidly progressed and increased patients’ life expectancies, there are now more adults with CF in the U.S. than children, according to the CF Foundation Patient Registry.

As a patient who works in the science field, I started to ask myself: Where does that number come from? Should this one variable be such a deciding factor? Are we getting comprehensive results from these studies if a subset of patients is omitted? Are investigators using eligibility criteria from a prior study without determining whether the exclusions are scientifically justifiable?

To continue reading, please visit MedPage Today.

Sound Pharmaceuticals to present initial data on the STOP Ototoxicity Study at Cystic Fibrosis Conference

SEATTLESept. 25, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Sound Pharmaceuticals (SPI) is pleased to announce that its recent submission to the upcoming North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC) Oct. 18-20 has been selected as a late-breaking abstract. This presentation will focus on the incidence and severity of ototoxicity in CF patients undergoing intravenous (IV) tobramycin treatment for acute pulmonary exacerbation. Ototoxicity (hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo or dizziness) is a common side effect of tobramycin and other aminoglycoside antibiotics (amikacin, gentamycin and streptomycin). Currently, there are no FDA approved therapies for the prevention or treatment of ototoxicity or any other type of sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, or dizziness. Continue reading Sound Pharmaceuticals to present initial data on the STOP Ototoxicity Study at Cystic Fibrosis Conference

Check out Jerry Cahill’s latest Cystic Fibrosis Podcasts

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 196: Managing CF as a Track Athlete

In Jerry Cahill’s latest video podcast, we meet Teena Mobley – a Long Island University graduate and former track athlete. Diagnosed at 9 years old, Teena’s life changed as she adjusted to her new medication schedule while staying dedicated to fitness and health. She shares how exercise helps her manger her illness, remain positive, and continue to believe in herself.
This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from the Allergan Foundation to the Boomer Esiason Foundation.

—————————————————————————————————————————–

Cystic Fibrosis Podcast 197: Moving from Middle School to High School

In Jerry Cahill’s latest cystic fibrosis video podcast, he spoke with Aidan Neville – a 13-year-old with CF who started 9th grade this year. He has two siblings, 22 cousins, and many more who make up his support system. While Aidan loves to stay active – surfing, playing football, and basketball – his exercise sometimes takes a backseat to his disease.
Because he is often on IVs and has had over 24 sinus surgeries, Aidan’s biggest concern about starting high school is missing class and that possibly negatively impacting his chances to go to the college of his choice.
Tune in to learn more about Aidan and his journey from middle school to high school.
This video podcast was made possible through an unrestricted educational grant from Gilead to the Boomer Esiason Foundation.

CF Foundation asking for Public Comment on Lung Transplant Referral Guidelines

Dear CF Community,

The CF Foundation seeks your input on the draft of the Lung Transplant Referral for Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Guidelines. This guideline is one in a series of guidelines for advanced stage lung disease; the other guidelines in progress on this topic include: Advanced Lung Disease Consensus Guidelines and Post Lung Transplant Consensus Guidelines.

A committee of CF health care providers, transplant healthcare providers, and an adult with CF researched and developed the consensus recommendation statements presented in the draft. It is our hope that you will add your input and feedback to ensure that our community issues actionable practice recommendations for lung transplant referral for individuals with cystic fibrosis.

To systematically collect feedback from the CF community, we have created an on-line tool which is linked below. We recommend that you review the attached document, Lung Transplant Referral for Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Consensus Guidelines PDF, and use the link below to enter your comments.

Submit comments here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LTxReferralPublicComment

The deadline for comments is Wednesday, October 10th, 2018, 5:00 PM, Eastern.

We value your input. Thank you in advance for taking time to review and provide us with feedback on this very important aspect of CF care.

If you have any questions, please contact shempstead@cff.org.

Sincerely,
Albert Faro

Albert Faro, M.D.
Senior Director of Clinical Affairs
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation | National Office

Take Our Survey. We’d love to hear from you!

Please consider taking our 5-10 minute survey so we can ensure that the CF Roundtable is the best it can be!
We value our readers’ feedback and would love to hear from you.

Two more weeks to apply for our LMK Scholarship! Due October 15th.

CF Roundtable offers the Lauren Melissa Kelly (LMK) Scholarship award each semester, in honor of Lauren Melissa Kelly. The academic scholarships of up to $2500 are awarded to adults with cystic fibrosis who are pursuing career certifications, associates, and bachelor and graduate degrees. Spring 2019 applications due on October 15th, 2018.  Continue reading Two more weeks to apply for our LMK Scholarship! Due October 15th.

Telavancin Promising Potential Treatment Option for MRSA in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

By Kristi Rosa

Responsible for several issues ranging from skin infections and sepsis to pneumonia and bloodstream infections, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus continues to plague patients in the health care and community setting, as well as the providers who treat them.

When acquired in patients with cystic fibrosis, clinical outcomes are known to be even worse, affecting several organs—primarily the lungs—and resulting in an increased rate of declined respiratory function as well as infections that can have severe, and sometimes deadly, consequences.

Now, however, for the first time, investigators have found that telavancin—a drug that is currently used to treat skin infections and hospital-acquired pneumonia—has potent in vitro activity and low resistance development potential when used against S aureus isolates in patients with cystic fibrosis, making it a promising potential treatment option for this population.

“Telavancin (TLV) is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2009 for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections and in 2013 for the treatment of cases of nosocomial pneumonia, however its application for the treatment of CF-MRSA pneumonia infections was not known, so our studies are contributing to extending the application of TLV for CF treatment,” Adriana E. Rosato, PhD, associate professor in the department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute told Contagion®. “We were also inspired by the fact that CF patients have a short life time—until 40 to 50 [years]—so our priority is to contribute to better treatment in this patient population.”

Dr. Rosato and her team hypothesized that TLV might be a promising treatment option for CF-patient-derived MRSA and MSSA infections, as in vitro studies have shown that TLV has activity against MRSA.

To prove this, the investigators screened a total of 333 strains of CF patient-derived S aureus of the wild-type or small-colony-variant phenotype, collected from both adults and children at 3 different cystic fibrosis centers: Houston Methodist Research Institute, UW Health and the Center for Global Infectious Disease Research. TLV was found to display activity against all 333 strains collected.

When testing the activity of the drug against 23 MRSA strains, the investigators observed intermediate resistance to ceftaroline (CPT)—a new beta-lactam antibiotic that targets PBP 2a in MRSA—in 20 of the strains, and high-level resistance to CPT in 3 of the strains. The authors note that although high levels of resistance to CPT is rare, intermediate resistance is more common in patients who have chronic infections.

“Among all strains, the TLV MIC90 was 0.06 mg/liter, i.e. 8-fold lower than the daptomycin (DAP) and CPT MIC90 and 25-fold lower than the linezolid (LZD) and vancomycin (VAN) MIC90,” the authors write.

Using time-kill experiments, the investigators assessed the in vitro effectiveness of TLV compared with DAP, VAN, and CPT. They found that TLV showed activity against all tested strains and displayed rapid bactericidal activity as well. The activity profile for the drug at a free serum concentration of 8 mg/liter showed that TLV performed better than VAN (16 mg/liter), LZD (10.4 mg/liter), and CPT (16 mg/liter).

The investigators also set out to determine the fate of mutation selection that could be projected by the potential prolonged use of TLV in patients with cystic fibrosis. To do this they looked at 3 specific strains: AMT 0114-48, WIS 664, and TMH 5007. They found that due to the ease of mutation selection which had been noted in control strains, TLV mutant resistance is independent of the CF patient background of the strains.

“We demonstrated that TLV has bactericidal activity against the S aureus strains tested, including those against which CPT and LZD displayed reduced activity, which might provide TLV a significant advantage over the drugs currently used to eradicate those strains and prevent future exacerbations,” the study authors write.

A clinical trial is currently underway to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of TLV in patients with cystic fibrosis, who usually need dose adjustment because of an increase in the volume of distribution and clearance.

“[The next step for our research is] to perform in-vivo analyses studies that could lead to translational application/clinical trial,” Dr. Rosato added. “However, we are limited in research funds to continue our investigations.”

Original article here.